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Razor Blade

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February 14, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Jail couldn't keep Israel Keyes out of trouble, not even with himself. The prolific serial killer had already been caught and jailed by authorities months ago for his final butchery -- the kidnapping and slaying of 18-year-old Anchorage barista Samantha Koenig, one of the eight people he'd alluded to killing over years of attacks across the country. But a new report released this week by the Alaska Department of Corrections detailed the extent to which the 34-year-old construction worker continued to cause trouble with his captors even as he cooperated with investigators working to discover whom he'd killed.
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NATIONAL
February 14, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Jail couldn't keep Israel Keyes out of trouble, not even with himself. The prolific serial killer had already been caught and jailed by authorities months ago for his final butchery -- the kidnapping and slaying of 18-year-old Anchorage barista Samantha Koenig, one of the eight people he'd alluded to killing over years of attacks across the country. But a new report released this week by the Alaska Department of Corrections detailed the extent to which the 34-year-old construction worker continued to cause trouble with his captors even as he cooperated with investigators working to discover whom he'd killed.
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BUSINESS
January 31, 2013 | David Lazarus
We can put men on the moon. We can make computers small enough to carry around in our pockets. But we can't make a razor blade that stays sharp longer than a week? It sounds trivial. But the utter lack of progress on the razor front raises fundamental questions about America's industrial might. Has the sun set on the age of innovation in this country? Is it possible that American ingenuity has met its match in a relatively modest personal-hygiene product used by millions of consumers?
OPINION
February 5, 2013
Re "Getting nicked by razor blade makers," Column, Feb. 1 Ralph Nader warned of built-in obsolescence in the 1960s. Back then, we ladies were asking, "If we can put a man on the moon, why can't they come up with a sheer stocking that doesn't run?" We live in a disposable world, and most financing and corporate planning seems based on that. It sort of makes a joke of recycling. David Lazarus' column on razor blades that seem built not to last touches on a theme that crosses my mind almost daily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1998
A woman who allegedly tried to slash her 8-week-old daughter with a razor blade was booked for attempted murder, authorities said. Mikona Turner, 31, was in custody Thursday at the County-USC Medical Center jail ward after being arrested Wednesday at 9:45 p.m., said Det. Ysabel Villegas of the Los Angeles Police Department's child abuse unit. Officers were called to a South-Central fast-food restaurant by witnesses who prevented the mother from slashing her daughter, Villegas said.
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | Reuters
U.S. postal officials and the local sheriff's office said Friday they were investigating how razor blades were put inside six letters sent through the mail in the area. At least one person suffered a gash on his thumb when he opened an envelope that had a single-edged razor blade glued to the inside flap. "The blades began coming in the mail starting last month," said Lawrence County Sheriff William Dorning. "One each was sent to . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1993
A man accused of stalking young women at a Burbank grocery store and at Simi Valley shopping centers and wedging industrial razor blades into the seats of their cars pleaded guilty Friday to five counts of assault with a deadly weapon. He was ordered to undergo psychological testing before being sentenced Oct. 8 in the courtroom of Ventura County Superior Court Judge Lawrence Storch, prosecutor said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2002 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 30 razor blades were discovered in a Mission Viejo park playground Sunday morning, marking the ninth time in a month that sharp objects have been found in south Orange County parks. A woman on her way to a softball tournament in Alicia Park noticed four razor blades near a slide on the playground. When sheriff's deputies combed the park with metal detectors, they found an additional 28 razor blades in the area, according to Jim Amormino, a Sheriff's Department spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2001 | MAI TRAN and TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For a month now, someone has been lurking in the shadows of several Costa Mesa and Newport Beach parks, leaving behind single-edged razor blades around swings, sandboxes and slides. Seven blades have been found, mostly by parents playing with their children. No one has been cut, but the discoveries have caused concern. Many parents are restricting their children to backyard play, and dog owners too are avoiding the parks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2001 | MAI TRAN and DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Neon-green warning signs were posted on tree trunks and in play areas at two Costa Mesa parks Thursday after nannies and parents found razor blades on slides and in sand boxes, and pornographic magazines in bushes and restrooms, officials said. "We've stepped up inspection of those areas," said Bruce Hartley, the city's maintenance services manager. "Traditionally, you find the normal litter at parks but nothing malicious like this."
BUSINESS
January 31, 2013 | David Lazarus
We can put men on the moon. We can make computers small enough to carry around in our pockets. But we can't make a razor blade that stays sharp longer than a week? It sounds trivial. But the utter lack of progress on the razor front raises fundamental questions about America's industrial might. Has the sun set on the age of innovation in this country? Is it possible that American ingenuity has met its match in a relatively modest personal-hygiene product used by millions of consumers?
BUSINESS
March 7, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
A Santa Monica start-up wants to take the financial pain out of shaving. Dollar Shave Club is a new membership-only website that promises to "shave time, shave money" by sending customers a shipment of razor blades automatically every month. The company estimates that it will save members as much as $292 a year on shaving. "For a very long time people have been flummoxed by the price of brand-name razors, so they hang on to their blades for longer than they should and milk their blades," company co-founder and Chief Executive Michael Dubin said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2010 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
When UCLA neuroscientist J. David Jentsch was a grad student, he never expected his life as an academic would require around-the-clock armed guards, or a closed-circuit TV inside his bedroom so he could keep constant watch over his home. But the high-powered security proved necessary again this month when the researcher, who experiments on monkeys, opened a letter left in his mailbox to discover razor blades and a death threat. "We follow you on campus," Jentsch recalled the note reading.
IMAGE
August 23, 2009 | Adam Tschorn
At some point in every shaving man's life, the moment comes when he looks himself in the mirror and asks: "How many blades are enough?" From the time a caveman first laid a piece of chipped flint against his face until Gillette introduced the first two-blade safety razor (the Trac II) in 1971, a single blade was all that was necessary. After the debut of the twin blade, there were tweaks along the way -- pivoting heads, retractable blades, "microfins" that were supposed to raise up the facial hairs for a closer shave -- but it remained a tranquil time for tonsorial technology.
NEWS
January 30, 2008 | Elizabeth Snead, Special to The Times
Costume designer Colleen Atwood, a six-time Oscar nominee and two-time winner ("Memoirs of a Geisha," "Chicago"), has spent a lot of time making the strange, dark cinematic dreams of Tim Burton come to life ("Edward Scissorhands," "Sleepy Hollow"). But "Sweeney Todd," the surreal slice-and-dice musical saga of a barber obsessed with revenge on the decadent society that wronged him, was her biggest challenge yet. So what did she do first? She listened to the music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2007 | From Times Staff Reports
Razor blades, box cutters and other sharp objects have been found in the Lennox Park sandbox, county authorities said. Employees at the county park at 10828 Mansel Ave. found the objects near the slides, swings and monkey bars, said Sgt. Gia Neil of the county Sheriff's Department's Lennox Station. The first discovery was made about three weeks ago. No injuries have been reported, but authorities are urging caution and are trying to alert families to the potential hazards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1993 | DWAYNE BRAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura man accused of stalking young women at Simi Valley shopping centers and wedging industrial razor blades into the seats of their cars had a grudge against his ex-girlfriend's 25-year-old daughter, a prosecutor said Friday. In the first hint at Gary Jean Muntifering's possible motive for the razor blade attacks on 14 women, Deputy Dist. Atty. Stacy Ratner said the daughter of Muntifering's former girlfriend had to get a restraining order to keep him away from her two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2005 | Caitlin Liu and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
A gang member on trial for two slayings Monday spat a razor blade out of his mouth and used it to slash his attorney's arm in a San Fernando courtroom. Erik Morales inflicted a 2 1/2-inch gash on Linda Wieder's right bicep, authorities said. Wieder, a deputy alternate public defender, was treated at Providence Holy Cross Hospital in Mission Hills, where she received five stitches. "She's doing OK," said Henry Hall, Wieder's supervisor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2004 | Constance Meyer, Special to The Times
Decades ago, Ripley's Believe It or Not clued readers in about the English horn. The instrument, it declared, is "neither English nor a horn." In fact, there's little agreement about where the name of this double-reed woodwind, a member of the oboe family, came from -- only consensus that it's a misnomer. Good luck if you query an Englishman about it. Show him a picture and he might well correct you: "Oh, you mean the cor anglais."
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