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OPINION
January 26, 2010
Hugo Chavez is nothing if not a man of his word. The Venezuelan president promised to remove obstacles to his Bolivarian socialist revolution, be they judicial, electoral or constitutional, and that's exactly what he has done. He has successfully squeezed out his opponents in Congress -- his allies control all 167 seats -- and the Supreme Court and the National Electoral Council, which supervises elections, are stacked with his loyalists. Last year Chavez pushed through a referendum eliminating presidential term limits, and his next order of business was muzzling the press.
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WORLD
May 14, 2013 | By Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - The sale of Globovision, Venezuela's last major television station critical of the government, raised concern Tuesday that no mass media platform may remain on which to challenge the Chavista administration of President Nicolas Maduro. The sale of the station for an undisclosed price by an ownership group led by Guillermo Zuloaga, now self-exiled in Miami, was completed Monday night, according to a statement the broadcaster posted on its website. Zuloaga had said mounting government fines and political harassment had left him with no choice but to sell.
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OPINION
June 3, 2007
Re "In Venezuela, popular TV station goes dark," May 29 Venezuelan television station RCTV is in arrears on its taxes, has violated labor laws and has pornography infractions. The rub is that RCTV is in opposition to the Venezuelan government. RCTV was party to the illegal military coup against the democratically elected government of Hugo Chavez in 2002. RCTV will no longer have access to the public airwaves but will continue to broadcast on satellite and cable. The issue is not free speech but the sovereign right of a state to regulate its public airwaves.
WORLD
August 29, 2012 | Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon
It's prime-time TV in Venezuela and the host is saying that opposition presidential candidate Henrique Capriles, whose grandmother was a Holocaust survivor, is a Nazi and Hitler cultist. "You can say what you want about your ancestors, but you are a Nazi," host Miguez Perez says of Capriles, who has Jewish ancestry but is a practicing Roman Catholic. The program is not some renegade gossip show but one earning pride of place on Venezuela's state-owned VTV channel, which is seen as closely reflecting the views of leftist President Hugo Chavez.
WORLD
May 14, 2013 | By Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - The sale of Globovision, Venezuela's last major television station critical of the government, raised concern Tuesday that no mass media platform may remain on which to challenge the Chavista administration of President Nicolas Maduro. The sale of the station for an undisclosed price by an ownership group led by Guillermo Zuloaga, now self-exiled in Miami, was completed Monday night, according to a statement the broadcaster posted on its website. Zuloaga had said mounting government fines and political harassment had left him with no choice but to sell.
WORLD
August 29, 2012 | Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon
It's prime-time TV in Venezuela and the host is saying that opposition presidential candidate Henrique Capriles, whose grandmother was a Holocaust survivor, is a Nazi and Hitler cultist. "You can say what you want about your ancestors, but you are a Nazi," host Miguez Perez says of Capriles, who has Jewish ancestry but is a practicing Roman Catholic. The program is not some renegade gossip show but one earning pride of place on Venezuela's state-owned VTV channel, which is seen as closely reflecting the views of leftist President Hugo Chavez.
WORLD
July 29, 2010 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
From the time it goes on the air until it signs off, Globovision lets Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez have it with both barrels. The Caracas-based opposition news and opinion channel's newsreaders and reporters — who make no pretense of impartiality and remain undeterred by harassment and threats of a takeover — regularly blast the president with obviously slanted coverage while giving opposition politicians free and usually unchallenged...
WORLD
May 29, 2007 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Venezuelan folk music, a Cuban documentary and heavy doses of government propaganda glorifying "21st century socialism" highlighted the first day of a new television channel that on Monday took over airspace of this nation's oldest and most popular station, a frequent critic of leftist President Hugo Chavez.
WORLD
January 26, 2010 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
Reporting from Caracas, Venezuela, and Quito, Ecuador -- Protests broke out in Venezuela on Monday after cable companies dropped transmission of a popular channel that the government declared had broken telecommunications laws by not broadcasting President Hugo Chavez's speeches. Government critics and supporters of Radio Caracas Television took to the streets of Caracas, the capital, and several other cities after companies dropped RCTV's programming under threat of losing their licenses.
WORLD
May 26, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Venezuela's top court ordered the Defense Ministry to guard and control transmission equipment and antennas belonging to an opposition television station that President Hugo Chavez has ordered closed. Chavez accuses RCTV of backing a 2002 coup against him, but the order to close it Monday has prompted international condemnation. The Supreme Court determined that the government must take RCTV's broadcast equipment to ensure a smooth transfer to a state channel.
WORLD
July 29, 2010 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
From the time it goes on the air until it signs off, Globovision lets Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez have it with both barrels. The Caracas-based opposition news and opinion channel's newsreaders and reporters — who make no pretense of impartiality and remain undeterred by harassment and threats of a takeover — regularly blast the president with obviously slanted coverage while giving opposition politicians free and usually unchallenged...
OPINION
January 26, 2010
Hugo Chavez is nothing if not a man of his word. The Venezuelan president promised to remove obstacles to his Bolivarian socialist revolution, be they judicial, electoral or constitutional, and that's exactly what he has done. He has successfully squeezed out his opponents in Congress -- his allies control all 167 seats -- and the Supreme Court and the National Electoral Council, which supervises elections, are stacked with his loyalists. Last year Chavez pushed through a referendum eliminating presidential term limits, and his next order of business was muzzling the press.
WORLD
January 26, 2010 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
Reporting from Caracas, Venezuela, and Quito, Ecuador -- Protests broke out in Venezuela on Monday after cable companies dropped transmission of a popular channel that the government declared had broken telecommunications laws by not broadcasting President Hugo Chavez's speeches. Government critics and supporters of Radio Caracas Television took to the streets of Caracas, the capital, and several other cities after companies dropped RCTV's programming under threat of losing their licenses.
OPINION
June 3, 2007
Re "In Venezuela, popular TV station goes dark," May 29 Venezuelan television station RCTV is in arrears on its taxes, has violated labor laws and has pornography infractions. The rub is that RCTV is in opposition to the Venezuelan government. RCTV was party to the illegal military coup against the democratically elected government of Hugo Chavez in 2002. RCTV will no longer have access to the public airwaves but will continue to broadcast on satellite and cable. The issue is not free speech but the sovereign right of a state to regulate its public airwaves.
WORLD
May 29, 2007 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Venezuelan folk music, a Cuban documentary and heavy doses of government propaganda glorifying "21st century socialism" highlighted the first day of a new television channel that on Monday took over airspace of this nation's oldest and most popular station, a frequent critic of leftist President Hugo Chavez.
OPINION
May 30, 2007 | Bart Jones, BART JONES spent eight years in Venezuela, mainly as a foreign correspondent for the Associated Press, and is the author of the forthcoming book "Hugo! The Hugo Chavez Story, From Mud Hut to Perpetual Revolution."
VENEZUELAN President Hugo Chavez's refusal to renew the license of Radio Caracas Television might seem to justify fears that Chavez is crushing free speech and eliminating any voices critical of him. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, the Committee to Protect Journalists and members of the European Parliament, the U.S. Senate and even Chile's Congress have denounced the closure of RCTV, Venezuela's oldest private television network.
WORLD
May 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Tens of thousands of Venezuelans took to the streets Saturday, chanting "Freedom! Freedom!" to protest President Hugo Chavez's decision not to renew the broadcast license of the country's most-watched TV station, an outlet for the opposition. Police lined a Caracas avenue while the protesters paraded past, some holding signs reading "No to silence," while others had tape over their mouths.
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