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NEWS
October 13, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Radial keratotomy, the controversial surgical technique in which slits are made in the surface of the eye to eliminate the need for glasses, is both safe and effective, according to results of a 10-year study directed by USC and sponsored by the National Eye Institute. The study's findings, proponents say, may put to rest concerns over the procedure. But the results also raise questions about its long-term effects.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When is a book not a book? Or a memorial not a memorial? These seem key questions to ask on this, International Holocaust Remembrance Day , and perhaps especially in regard to Phil Chernofsky's “And Every Single One Was Someone,” a 1,250-page oversized hardcover inscribed with 6 million words, every one of which is “Jew.” “When you look at this at a distance, you can't tell whether it's upside down or right side up, you can't tell...
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | DAVID L. ULIN, BOOK CRITIC
Mark Salzman's annus horribilis began with a case of writer's block. It was spring 2009, and he was overdue on a novel -- set during what he refers to as the "conquest period" of the Mongol Empire, in the 13th century -- that wasn't going well. "I had handed in a third draft of that novel," he remembers over a simple lunch of fruit and pasta in his La Canada Flintridge kitchen, "and it wasn't good enough. I was starting to feel desperate. I'm one of those people for whom, when it comes to what I want to say or my feeling that I have something to say, I go through long stretches where I'm becalmed.
SPORTS
April 18, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Jamie Moyer is the oldest pitcher ever to win a Major League Baseball game. At 49 years, 150 days old, the Colorado Rockies pitcher earned his first win of the season Tuesday, going seven innings in a 5-3 victory over the San Diego Padres. In doing so, he breaks a record that stood for nearly 80 years. Jack Quinn of the Brooklyn Dodgers was the previous elder statesman of the mound after getting a win on Sept. 13, 1932, when he was 49 years, 70 days old. “It's an historic night for one tremendous human being,” Rockies manager Jim Tracy said.
SPORTS
December 13, 2008
Thank you for correcting your ridiculous decision to omit out-of-town hockey box scores from the sports section. Is there any chance you can either enlarge or bold them so I can stick with my 2.25 reading glasses and not have to go up to the 2.50 ones? Richie Decker Calabasas
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
When reading the fine print on maps and in telephone books becomes difficult, some people simply buy a pair of off-the-rack reading glasses. After all, they're easy to get and low in cost, priced from $15 to $20. But just how safe are they? "Ready-to-wear reading glasses . . .
NEWS
November 7, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The wider a woman's hips, the easier childbirth will be." No. "The external flare of the hips has no direct relationship to the size of the bony birth canal through which the baby's head has to traverse," says Dr. Irwin Frankel, a Century City obstetrician/gynecologist and USC clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1986
I really thought that my eyes were playing a Halloween prank! I even put on stronger reading glasses, but the message my eyes conveyed was not false or misread. I refer to the ridiculous few paragraphs written by David Kolpacoff. No wonder my glasses fogged over. Put Ronald Reagan's image on Mt. Rushmore! The ramblings and sometimes nearly sinister writings of the pro-Reagan crowd are just about too much for this "quaint" liberal to comprehend, as well as for most middle-of-the-roaders.
NEWS
June 23, 2000
In Ben Franklin's day, elders with failing vision wore ready-made spectacles, primitive magnifying glasses in various strengths to help them read or sew. Now, readers are becoming chic with a momentum made possible only by the sheer numbers of never-say-old baby boomers. Each year from now until 2010, manufacturers expect about 4 million people to turn 40, the magic age when small print grows fuzzy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2001
"Troops Posted at LAX, S.F. Airport" (Oct. 6) left me with just a few questions. First, my hat's off to the men and women called up to serve. I pray for their safety. And I hope everyone else does too. Their M-16s are not loaded. At least that's what your story said. What are they supposed to do if they encounter a suspected terrorist threat? Yell "Bang!"? Why have them there at all if they can't defend themselves, let alone the traveling public? If we're going to train them to do what they do and then call them up in a time of crisis or tragedy, we ought to at least make sure they have all the tools to do the job. One more thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | DAVID L. ULIN, BOOK CRITIC
Mark Salzman's annus horribilis began with a case of writer's block. It was spring 2009, and he was overdue on a novel -- set during what he refers to as the "conquest period" of the Mongol Empire, in the 13th century -- that wasn't going well. "I had handed in a third draft of that novel," he remembers over a simple lunch of fruit and pasta in his La Canada Flintridge kitchen, "and it wasn't good enough. I was starting to feel desperate. I'm one of those people for whom, when it comes to what I want to say or my feeling that I have something to say, I go through long stretches where I'm becalmed.
WORLD
February 12, 2012 | By Alexandra Zavis and Rima Marrouch, Los Angeles Times
As the evening call to prayer sounded through the alleyways of old Damascus, the aging storyteller known as Abu Shadi clambered into an elevated chair at the Nawfara cafe, slipped on a pair of rimless reading glasses and turned to the page where he'd left off. An expectant silence settled over the smoke-filled room, interrupted by the clink of coffee cups and tea glasses. For two decades, Abu Shadi has regaled his audience of shopkeepers, university students and tourists with epic tales of war and romance, heroes and rogues from the classics of Arabic literature.
TRAVEL
December 20, 2009 | By Terry Gardner
Until short security lines and turbulence-free skies come gift-wrapped, here are some holiday gifts and a few stocking stuffers that can lessen the stress of your frequent flier. Most cost less than $35. For help with this list, I consulted Anne Banas, executive editor of SmarterTravel.com, Joe Brancatelli, who produces the JoeSentMe newsletter for business travelers, product developer Phil Baker, consumer writer Christopher Elliott, Matt Daimler of SeatGuru and George Hobica of Airfarewatchdog.
SPORTS
December 13, 2008
Thank you for correcting your ridiculous decision to omit out-of-town hockey box scores from the sports section. Is there any chance you can either enlarge or bold them so I can stick with my 2.25 reading glasses and not have to go up to the 2.50 ones? Richie Decker Calabasas
HEALTH
November 7, 2005 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
The big promise of Lasik vision-correction surgery -- that you could throw away your glasses and contacts -- was only a half-truth, as maturing Lasik patients are beginning to realize. Lasik has become hugely popular over the last decade, especially among young adults. But by middle age, virtually everyone develops presbyopia, the inability to read or focus close-up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2002 | George Skelton
SACRAMENTO Maybe the airlines with their incompetence and klutziness at security checkpoints are doing us a big favor. They're prodding us into alternative modes of travel, at least in California. Since Sept. 11, you can't even take a fingernail clip on board a plane, or a small screwdriver to repair reading glasses when a lens falls out. Lines are ludicrously long. And the other day, I had to stand in an extra line to be patted down and take my shoes off. My sin was forgetting to remove one ballpoint pen from a pocket.
SPORTS
April 18, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Jamie Moyer is the oldest pitcher ever to win a Major League Baseball game. At 49 years, 150 days old, the Colorado Rockies pitcher earned his first win of the season Tuesday, going seven innings in a 5-3 victory over the San Diego Padres. In doing so, he breaks a record that stood for nearly 80 years. Jack Quinn of the Brooklyn Dodgers was the previous elder statesman of the mound after getting a win on Sept. 13, 1932, when he was 49 years, 70 days old. “It's an historic night for one tremendous human being,” Rockies manager Jim Tracy said.
HEALTH
November 7, 2005 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
The big promise of Lasik vision-correction surgery -- that you could throw away your glasses and contacts -- was only a half-truth, as maturing Lasik patients are beginning to realize. Lasik has become hugely popular over the last decade, especially among young adults. But by middle age, virtually everyone develops presbyopia, the inability to read or focus close-up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2001
"Troops Posted at LAX, S.F. Airport" (Oct. 6) left me with just a few questions. First, my hat's off to the men and women called up to serve. I pray for their safety. And I hope everyone else does too. Their M-16s are not loaded. At least that's what your story said. What are they supposed to do if they encounter a suspected terrorist threat? Yell "Bang!"? Why have them there at all if they can't defend themselves, let alone the traveling public? If we're going to train them to do what they do and then call them up in a time of crisis or tragedy, we ought to at least make sure they have all the tools to do the job. One more thing.
NEWS
June 23, 2000
In Ben Franklin's day, elders with failing vision wore ready-made spectacles, primitive magnifying glasses in various strengths to help them read or sew. Now, readers are becoming chic with a momentum made possible only by the sheer numbers of never-say-old baby boomers. Each year from now until 2010, manufacturers expect about 4 million people to turn 40, the magic age when small print grows fuzzy.
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