Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReagan Doctrine
IN THE NEWS

Reagan Doctrine

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In March, 1981, two months after President Ronald Reagan had entered the White House, CIA Director William J. Casey wrote a fateful memo outlining a covert plan to roll back communism worldwide by aiding resistance forces in Afghanistan, Cuba, Grenada, Iran, Libya, Nicaragua, Cambodia and Laos. The overt and covert dimensions of what would eventually be called the Reagan Doctrine became a matter of record in places like Afghanistan, Cambodia, Iran and Nicaragua.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In March, 1981, two months after President Ronald Reagan had entered the White House, CIA Director William J. Casey wrote a fateful memo outlining a covert plan to roll back communism worldwide by aiding resistance forces in Afghanistan, Cuba, Grenada, Iran, Libya, Nicaragua, Cambodia and Laos. The overt and covert dimensions of what would eventually be called the Reagan Doctrine became a matter of record in places like Afghanistan, Cambodia, Iran and Nicaragua.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1986 | ERNEST CONINE, Ernest Conine is a Times editorial writer
President Reagan will journey to Grenada later this month to celebrate the American deliverance of the small Caribbean island from Marxist rule in the fall of 1983. Maybe he will use the occasion to give his own explanation of the new "Reagan Doctrine" that the Republican right has been talking about.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1987 | DAVID AARON, David Aaron, a former deputy on the National Security Council, advised Democrat Walter F. Mondale in his 1984 presidential campaign. Aaron's novel, "State Scarlet," based on a White House crisis, will be published in April by G. Putnam & Sons.
Ronald Reagan had done it twice before, but could he do it again? During the 1980 presidential campaign he stepped onto the stage with Jimmy Carter and amiably dispelled the fear that he was a trigger-happy warmonger. After fumbling badly in his first debate with Walter F. Mondale in 1984, he won the second by simply not falling off the podium. The same "expectations gap" worked in President Reagan's favor Wednesday night.
NEWS
August 31, 1986 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
What began several years ago when President Reagan penciled the words freedom fighters into the margins of a staff-written speech is now being heralded in Congress and elsewhere as a watershed in U.S. foreign policy: a pledge that the United States will come to the aid of Third World anti-Communist resistance groups around the globe. While attention has focused on the President's controversial $100-million program for the Nicaraguan contras, millions of dollars in U.S.
NEWS
June 16, 1985 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration is developing a sweeping new foreign policy doctrine that provides for a more assertive U.S. role in the Third World. From Nicaragua to Angola, from Afghanistan to Cambodia, Administration officials say, the United States should actively--and overtly--back rebellions against pro-Soviet regimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1987 | DAVID AARON, David Aaron, a former deputy on the National Security Council, advised Democrat Walter F. Mondale in his 1984 presidential campaign. Aaron's novel, "State Scarlet," based on a White House crisis, will be published in April by G. Putnam & Sons.
Ronald Reagan had done it twice before, but could he do it again? During the 1980 presidential campaign he stepped onto the stage with Jimmy Carter and amiably dispelled the fear that he was a trigger-happy warmonger. After fumbling badly in his first debate with Walter F. Mondale in 1984, he won the second by simply not falling off the podium. The same "expectations gap" worked in President Reagan's favor Wednesday night.
BOOKS
January 25, 1987 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Titles reviewed in Paperback Originals have been published in paperback only or in simultaneous paperback and hardcover editions. and
If journalism is the rough draft of history, then Reagan and Gorbachev by Michael Mandelbaum and Strobe Talbott (Vintage: $5.95) is a second draft, polished and plumped up but still lacking the perspective that only true scholarship and time will bring.
OPINION
March 2, 1986 | CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
The Reagan foreign policy today might be called responsible pan-interventionism. (Any perceived oxymoron lies in the eye of the beholder; the United States has never been involved in more places in the world than it is today, and yet it is hard to think of a time in, say, the last 25 years when the United States has been less at risk of war.) Under pan-interventionism, the authoritarian-totalitarian distinction, as a prescription for where to intervene, dissolves.
OPINION
February 16, 1986 | ROBERT E. HUNTER, Robert E. Hunter is director of European studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies at Georgetown.
With more emphasis and enthusiasm than before, President Reagan has again pledged America's "moral and material assistance" to opponents of the Soviet Union and its proxies in Afghanistan, Angola, Cambodia and Nicaragua. No other aspect of Reagan foreign policy is more controversial. True believers assert that it is past time for the United States to take the offensive against Soviet-backed regimes.
BOOKS
January 25, 1987 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Titles reviewed in Paperback Originals have been published in paperback only or in simultaneous paperback and hardcover editions. and
If journalism is the rough draft of history, then Reagan and Gorbachev by Michael Mandelbaum and Strobe Talbott (Vintage: $5.95) is a second draft, polished and plumped up but still lacking the perspective that only true scholarship and time will bring.
NEWS
August 31, 1986 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
What began several years ago when President Reagan penciled the words freedom fighters into the margins of a staff-written speech is now being heralded in Congress and elsewhere as a watershed in U.S. foreign policy: a pledge that the United States will come to the aid of Third World anti-Communist resistance groups around the globe. While attention has focused on the President's controversial $100-million program for the Nicaraguan contras, millions of dollars in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1986 | ERNEST CONINE, Ernest Conine is a Times editorial writer
President Reagan will journey to Grenada later this month to celebrate the American deliverance of the small Caribbean island from Marxist rule in the fall of 1983. Maybe he will use the occasion to give his own explanation of the new "Reagan Doctrine" that the Republican right has been talking about.
NEWS
June 16, 1985 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration is developing a sweeping new foreign policy doctrine that provides for a more assertive U.S. role in the Third World. From Nicaragua to Angola, from Afghanistan to Cambodia, Administration officials say, the United States should actively--and overtly--back rebellions against pro-Soviet regimes.
NEWS
March 31, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
As a direct result of the Iran- contra scandal, Congress is moving to put strict new controls on the clandestine military assistance that President Reagan has been giving to anti-Communist insurgencies around the globe. Under the policy known as the Reagan Doctrine, the Administration funnels millions of dollars through the CIA each year to rebel groups in Afghanistan, Angola and Cambodia as well as to the anti-Sandinista forces in Nicaragua.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1987 | CHRISTOPHER LAYNE, Christopher Layne, a Los Angeles attorney and adjunct scholar of the Cato Institute in Washington, has written widely about foreign affairs. and
The Iran- contra hearings raised a basic issue: Can a democracy be a superpower without compromising its domestic political principles? There has always been a sharp split between those who believe that the cause of liberty is advanced by America's pursuit of world power and those who believe that a foreign policy of restraint is essential to preserving constitutional government at home.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|