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Reagan Legacy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1989
In response to Robert J. Samuelson's "Reagan's Legacy Needs No Slogan" (Op-Ed Page, Jan. 11), I wish to suggest that he is wrong and that a very appropriate slogan would be "Borrow and borrow, spend and spend." Given his statement that the debt "nearly tripled since 1980 to more than $2.6 trillion" it seems fair to ascribe about $1.7 trillion to the Reagan Administration. If one divides $1.7 trillion by 250 million, the present U.S. population, the per capita increase in debt is $6,800 during the Reagan Administration.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
In the eight years since he died, Ronald Reagan has lent his name to at least 31 roads, 17 schools, a federal courthouse in Orange County, a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier based in San Diego, a missile-testing range in the Marshall Islands and now, a golf hole in Moorpark. It's the par-three 11th hole at Tierra Rejada Golf Course, where the tee commands a sweeping view that includes the Reagan Library on a hilltop in nearby Simi Valley. Course officials and Reagan Foundation executives on Thursday unveiled a plaque set in a rock monument and dedicated to the 40th president, "who always believed, like golfers do, 'Our most glorious achievements are just ahead.' " Taken from his speech at the 1992 Republican convention, the trademark ray of Reagan sunshine is not misplaced on the 210-yard hole, which requires golfers to loft their first shot over a cliff.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
In the eight years since he died, Ronald Reagan has lent his name to at least 31 roads, 17 schools, a federal courthouse in Orange County, a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier based in San Diego, a missile-testing range in the Marshall Islands and now, a golf hole in Moorpark. It's the par-three 11th hole at Tierra Rejada Golf Course, where the tee commands a sweeping view that includes the Reagan Library on a hilltop in nearby Simi Valley. Course officials and Reagan Foundation executives on Thursday unveiled a plaque set in a rock monument and dedicated to the 40th president, "who always believed, like golfers do, 'Our most glorious achievements are just ahead.' " Taken from his speech at the 1992 Republican convention, the trademark ray of Reagan sunshine is not misplaced on the 210-yard hole, which requires golfers to loft their first shot over a cliff.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2012 | By David Horsey
Rick Santorum has stoically deflected the jeers of pro-gay marriage young Republicans in New Hampshire. Mitt Romney jauntily sloughs off Newt Gingrich's daily rhetorical darts. But there is a bigger challenge all the presidential candidates are failing: the Ronald Reagan measure. Republicans have not yet fallen in love with Romney or coalesced around any of his more conservative rivals because, compared to the iconic Reagan who folks on the right picture in their minds and hold sacred in their hearts, the entire bunch of would-be presidents looks either small or suspect or both.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2002 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Long before he became the 40th president, Ronald Reagan was asked by his son Michael for a bigger allowance. His reply: "When the government lets me keep more of my paycheck." Michael Reagan recalls that lesson fondly in "Ronald Reagan: A Legacy Remembered," a two-hour biography at 9 tonight on the History Channel.
OPINION
September 28, 1986 | David M. O'Brien, David M. O'Brien is a professor at the University of Virginia and author of "Storm Center: The Supreme Court in American Politics."
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III is now perhaps the single most powerful person in Reagan's inner circle. In addition to turning the Department of Justice around, his influence extends throughout the government. His ambitious and coherent agenda will define much of the domestic policy during Ronald Reagan's remaining years in office and attempt to preserve that policy for years to come. Meese's enormous power follows largely from his close personal ties to the President, unmatched since Atty. Gen.
OPINION
September 9, 2011
Gipper wannabes Re "Perry, Romney clash in debate over jobs and Social Security," Sept. 8 During the debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Rick Perry, Mitt Romney, Michele Bachmann, Newt Gingrich and the other candidates mentioned President Reagan's name more than two-dozen times. Clearly, each of the Republican candidates was trying to convince voters that he or she is the second coming of Reagan. It's one thing to talk about one's conservative values.
OPINION
August 29, 2007 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Like george w. bush, Ronald Reagan began the final two years of his presidency at low ebb. In the November 1986 election, Democrats recaptured a Senate majority, providing them complete control of Congress for the first time in Reagan's presidency. Almost immediately, the Iran-Contra arms-for-hostages scandal erupted. Just two years after his landslide reelection in 1984, Reagan appeared crippled.
OPINION
May 7, 2007
Re "Differences emerge as Republicans debate," May 4 During the Republican presidential debate, Rep. Tom Tancredo of Colorado said that it would be the greatest day in our country's history if Roe vs. Wade were overturned. What a sad commentary on the man's thinking. To think that reversing Roe vs. Wade would be an end to abortions is not very smart. But when you think about the greatest day in our country's history, how about an end to the Iraq war? How about if our country found a way to cure all cancers?
BOOKS
February 26, 2006 | John Powers, John Powers is the author of "Sore Winners: And the Rest of Us in George Bush's America."
"IT really gets me when the critics say I haven't done enough for the economy," cracked George W. Bush during the 2004 campaign. "I mean, look what I've done for the book publishing industry." He wasn't altogether kidding. This is a presidency that has launched a thousand screeds -- Molly Ivins' "Bushwhacked," Maureen Dowd's "Bushworld," Michael Moore's "Dude, Where's My Country?," Al Franken's "The Truth (With Jokes)" -- and turned liberal journalism into an armada captained by Ahabs.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
When President Bush attends the ribbon-cutting ceremony this morning for a new exhibit at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, he will bask in the legacy of the most revered icon in contemporary Republican circles. But many Reagan loyalists are rejecting Bush's claim as Reagan's political heir.
OPINION
August 29, 2004 | Jacob Heilbrunn, Jacob Heilbrunn is a Los Angeles Times editorial writer.
The Republican convention this week is certain to look like a lovefest of party unity. Republican moderates such as Rudolph W. Giuliani will be trotted out alongside social conservatives such as Rick Santorum. They'll stand solidly united behind President Bush. And they'll also stand united in their reverence for another Republican president: Ronald Reagan.
OPINION
June 11, 2004
President Ronald Reagan: a man of contradictions. He bellowed against a government he felt was too large, yet government is called to accommodate his funeral procession at considerable costs of time and money. He said it was government that was the problem, yet he will lie on the Lincoln plinth. Abraham Lincoln said it is a government of the people, by the people, for the people. If Reagan believed Lincoln's philosophy, then he must have felt that the nation's people are the problem.
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