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Reagan Policy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1987
This is the way I see it under President Ronald Reagan: Capitalism for the masses. Socialism for the military-industrial complex. JEROME M. MARTINEZ Los Angeles
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BUSINESS
June 13, 2004 | James Flanigan
There have been countless commentaries on the life and contributions of Ronald Reagan in the last week, but few that truly captured the legacy of Reaganomics. The former president's death stirred up the old debate about tax cuts and federal deficits. But no matter which side you come down on, the Reagan bequest is far more than that. He did nothing short of transform the economy. His fundamental idea was that we could leave it to the marketplace to take care of things.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1986
If the majority of South Africans were white and the minority blacks were in control, would Britain's Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan be so adamant against sanctions? I think not. MARY M. MOORE Van Nuys
OPINION
June 7, 2004
When Ronald Reagan became president, he was vilified at home and abroad as a "cowboy actor" with no foreign policy experience. The results of his eight years of presidency will confirm him as one of our great presidents (current liberal historians to the contrary). There is a parallel to President George W. Bush, who shares the same traits and criticisms. Perhaps history will confer the same greatness on President Bush for the foresight to confront radical Muslim terrorists instead of waiting for further strikes.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | GEORGE GEDDA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four years have passed since Jim Wright stood before a hushed House on a late spring day and announced he was resigning as Speaker. Then, the reason seemed obvious: A series of ethical lapses uncovered by House investigators had left him no choice. But the Texas Democrat, now 70, contends there were hidden forces behind his resignation that were far more damaging.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration on Tuesday said it will begin to prosecute manufacturers who require retailers to sell their products at certain prices, calling the stand a reversal of enforcement practices under the Reagan and Bush administrations. Such pricing requirements, known as vertical price fixing, violate antitrust laws and will be "vigorously and effectively" enforced, the Justice Department said in a statement.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a back seat to tax hikes and spending cuts in the public debate over President Clinton's economic program but some analysts think it could prove to be one of the most important--and popular--elements of the budget bill that just squeaked through Congress. In what amounts to a quiet yet dramatic shift in the nation's tax burden, the budget measure approved by the House and Senate late last week contains a $20.
NEWS
March 24, 1992
Friedrich August von Hayek, 92, the Nobel Prize-winning economist described as the intellectual guru of President Ronald Reagan's free-market policy-makers. Hayek was a British citizen of Austrian birth. His 1944 book, "The Road to Serfdom," stated that socialist economics would fail and warned that Western Europe and the United States were on a dangerous road toward excessive government involvement. In November, 1991, President Bush awarded Hayek the Medal of Freedom.
OPINION
January 12, 1992 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead, a contributing editor to Opinion, is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition" (Houghton Mifflin)
The Reagan-Thatcher experiment in economics is drawing to its close. As George Bush begs the Japanese for affirmative action for American cars, and as Britain reluctantly prepares to enter a monetary union dominated by Germany, the verdict of history is clear: The ultra-liberal economic policies so popular in the English-speaking world during the last generation do not work as well as the "social market" economics of the former Axis powers.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | JOHN KING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Elizabeth Hanford Dole began the debate over raising the 55 m.p.h. speed limit by stressing safety. But in the privacy of the Ronald Reagan White House, the debate turned to states rights, budget worries and election-year politics. "Mr.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George Bush did for a Republican mayoral candidate Thursday something that he had steadfastly declined to do for himself last year: He attacked Ronald Reagan. Not by name, of course. But the implication was clear--and clearly appreciated by the campaign of Republican mayoral hopeful Rudolph W. Giuliani, who has been racing to drop his connections with the former President as he seeks office in heavily Democratic New York.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian, frustrated at modern Turkey's refusal to admit responsibility for the massacre of Armenians in 1915, exhorted scholars Thursday to persevere in documenting research so no one can deny that the "genocide was anything but a stark reality." The son of immigrant parents and the nation's most prominent officeholder of Armenian ancestry, Deukmejian is passionate about the Armenian genocide issue and recognition of it by the United States. He lashed out at "present-day Turkish officials and certain revisionist historians" who he said have labeled as "forgeries" and "wartime propaganda" documentation of the mass slayings by Western observers.
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