Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReal Business
IN THE NEWS

Real Business

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1999 | JOHN ANDERSON, NEWSDAY
From press conference diatribes to more subtle forms of protest--T-shirts bearing a bull's-eye over a map of Serbia, for instance--you can't keep the world's troubles entirely out of the Cannes Film Festival, no matter how many Mercedeses and Manolo Blahnik pumps you scatter around the place. You can't keep it out of films either, regardless of the "Star Wars" hype outside or the presence of "EDtv" inside.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
And now without further interruption, we return you to the regular season. The Dodgers, undefeated for an entire week now, finally get back to business - their real business - when they play the San Diego Padres on Sunday night at Petco Park. It's their other opener, Major League Baseball's national opener, as opposed to that international opener they already underwent in Australia. It's made for a long, somewhat bizarre spring, full of early starts with the added bonus of an extra week of spring training after the Dodgers had already started their season in Sydney.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 21, 1990
The problem with stock bettors such as the Feshbach brothers, "Short Road to Success" (Oct. 14), is that they are gaining their riches at the expense of other gamblers with less information or luck. More power to them, but what does this have to do with business enterprises that are adding jobs and capital to the U.S. economy? The success stories of the stock manipulators and speculators belong in the same part of the paper as stories about big winners at the race track. It has nothing to do with real business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Los Feliz was buzzing Sunday afternoon as crowds of people lined up for hours to grab a cup of coffee from, uh, Dumb Starbucks. The mock store, which quietly opened Friday, is nearly identical to a typical Starbucks location, with tumblers and CDs, including "Dumb Jazz Standards," on display - but not for sale. Drinks are served in cups that mock the Seattle coffee giant's logo, while pastries are pulled from display cases straight in their Vons' packaging. The menu features such offerings as Dumb Iced Coffee, Dumb Frappuccinos and Wuppy Duppy Latte.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1994
The Los Angeles Unified School District and its teachers worked together furiously and wisely over the last few days and appear to have averted a strike. That's news that deserves applause, long and loud. Just last week the outlook didn't seem optimistic. The district and the teachers union were doing their usual political two-step. Nobody seemed to be talking about what the students were supposed to do if teachers were carrying picket signs instead of books when the school year began.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By August Brown
The British government of David Cameron may be on a serious austerity binge , but there's one cause they seem to be happy to fund -- exporting the country's pop music. The prime minster has announced that he's wrapping up the details of the new Music Export Growth initiative, according to Britain's Telegraph newspaper . It's designed to help replicate the international success of British artists like Adele. That singer, while signed to Columbia Records in America, is on the British indie XL (which discovered her and nurtured her career)
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
And now without further interruption, we return you to the regular season. The Dodgers, undefeated for an entire week now, finally get back to business - their real business - when they play the San Diego Padres on Sunday night at Petco Park. It's their other opener, Major League Baseball's national opener, as opposed to that international opener they already underwent in Australia. It's made for a long, somewhat bizarre spring, full of early starts with the added bonus of an extra week of spring training after the Dodgers had already started their season in Sydney.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day Darren Himeles came home from kindergarten and said, "Gee Mom, wouldn't it be fun to open up a lemonade stand?" That would be fine, said his mother, Barbara Ann, but why not make it a real business, just like I. Magnin and Saks Fifth Avenue, which are two big department stores just up the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shaunna Griffith never imagined she would become a welfare mother, but she had little choice after her husband vanished three years ago. An at-home mother left to care for her four children, Griffith quickly realized she could never make it without public assistance. Now something else is happening that she never thought possible--she owns her own business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2000 | JEREMY RIFKIN, Jeremy Rifkin is the author of "The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism Where All of Life is a Paid-For Experience" (Tarcher/Putnam, April 2000)
While there has been much discussion in recent weeks over the many changes taking place in our way of life as a result of the high-tech economy, the single biggest change is occurring relatively unnoticed: The near-warp speed of the new hypercapitalism is beginning to make ownership itself an outmoded concept. The implications of this are enormous and far-reaching.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By August Brown
The British government of David Cameron may be on a serious austerity binge , but there's one cause they seem to be happy to fund -- exporting the country's pop music. The prime minster has announced that he's wrapping up the details of the new Music Export Growth initiative, according to Britain's Telegraph newspaper . It's designed to help replicate the international success of British artists like Adele. That singer, while signed to Columbia Records in America, is on the British indie XL (which discovered her and nurtured her career)
BUSINESS
May 17, 2013 | By Emily Steel
This story starts at a point in time that most observers predicted it would end. The year was 2002. The Internet party was long over. Pets.com and other high-flying digital darlings were defunct. It was the dark days for the few survivors of the dot-com bubble, and Razorfish was barely hanging on. The brash online ad agency that had come to symbolize the arrogance and frivolity of the era had slashed its staff from 1,800 employees to just 230. The company was sold for $8.2 million - a minuscule fraction of its $4.2-billion market value just two years before.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before the last-minute run to the mall! The skinny: If you're reading this it means you're like me and had to do some work today. Well, we will try to make this a quick read so you and I can sneak out early and enjoy the evening. Monday's headlines include a box office recap and a review of "Django Unchained. " Merry Christmas to all my readers (I know you're out there) and also to fellow aggregators, especially I Want Media and Media Gazer. Daily dose: The National Football League stuck it to Fox and granted NBC's request to move next Sunday's much-anticipated Cowboys-Redskins game to prime time for its Sunday Night Football franchise.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2012 | By Mary Umberger
For many travelers and restaurant patrons, it has become almost a reflex to go online first to see what other people have to say about hotels and places to eat. Indeed, many companies regard online customer reviews as a crucial component of their marketing. In real estate, not so much. Only a few online outlets within the business encourage customers, satisfied and otherwise, to speak their minds. The Houston Assn. of Realtors — regarded as practically avant-garde for its innovations in an industry that has been famously resistant to change, particularly online — began encouraging agent reviews two years ago. A handful of independent websites such as Zillow allow various forms of agent ratings.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2010 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: Some former employees now work for me as independent contractors. Is this a tax problem? Answer: Many companies that downsized in recent years are bringing back employees as part-time contractors. The practice allows you to save up to 10% on payroll taxes and workers' compensation, but you must not misclassify them or you could face an unemployment tax audit, said T.J. Moore, an accountant with Citrin Cooperman in New York City. With states desperate for revenue, more small companies are being audited, Moore said.
WORLD
October 1, 2008 | Geraldine Baum, Times Staff Writer
So many world leaders have converged on the United Nations over the last week that at one point billionaire Bill Gates was left cooling his heels on East 46th Street in a "pedestrian freeze" while a presidential motorcade whizzed the wrong way down 1st Avenue. The founder of Microsoft was on his way to a U.N. summit to donate $167.8 million to eradicate malaria. Which makes you wonder: Which president was that anyway?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before the last-minute run to the mall! The skinny: If you're reading this it means you're like me and had to do some work today. Well, we will try to make this a quick read so you and I can sneak out early and enjoy the evening. Monday's headlines include a box office recap and a review of "Django Unchained. " Merry Christmas to all my readers (I know you're out there) and also to fellow aggregators, especially I Want Media and Media Gazer. Daily dose: The National Football League stuck it to Fox and granted NBC's request to move next Sunday's much-anticipated Cowboys-Redskins game to prime time for its Sunday Night Football franchise.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2013 | By Emily Steel
This story starts at a point in time that most observers predicted it would end. The year was 2002. The Internet party was long over. Pets.com and other high-flying digital darlings were defunct. It was the dark days for the few survivors of the dot-com bubble, and Razorfish was barely hanging on. The brash online ad agency that had come to symbolize the arrogance and frivolity of the era had slashed its staff from 1,800 employees to just 230. The company was sold for $8.2 million - a minuscule fraction of its $4.2-billion market value just two years before.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2008 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
Searching for new sources of revenue, Los Angeles Times Media Group is getting into the real estate business. On Monday, Times Media Group and other partners will launch ZetaBid, a business that will auction foreclosed homes and other properties. The company would also run a website where the properties could be viewed. The other partners are London-based GoIndustry-DoveBid, an auction specialist, and CataList Homes of Hermosa Beach, a real estate brokerage. The partners will share fees paid by the buyer on each home sold.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2007 | E. Scott Reckard, Times Staff Writer
Fremont General Corp., a lender that regulators forced out of the sub-prime mortgage business in March, said Tuesday that it would sell its commercial real-estate loan business and bring in a high-profile new team of investors and managers to run the company. Santa Monica-based Fremont said real estate investment trust IStar Financial Inc. would pay $1.9 billion for the commercial loan business and a 30% stake in an associated $6.5-billion loan portfolio.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|