Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReal Crime
IN THE NEWS

Real Crime

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Robert Greene
The documentary " Kids for Cash " breezed in and out of Los Angeles so quickly last month that there was little buzz (far too little) about just what the real crime was that the film depicted. That's a shame, because it's such an important story. Fortunately, the film now is set to be screened in the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center in a program hosted by Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-Los Angeles) and Sen. Robert Casey (D-Pa.), and later this month and next at spots around Southern California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Robert Greene
The documentary " Kids for Cash " breezed in and out of Los Angeles so quickly last month that there was little buzz (far too little) about just what the real crime was that the film depicted. That's a shame, because it's such an important story. Fortunately, the film now is set to be screened in the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center in a program hosted by Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-Los Angeles) and Sen. Robert Casey (D-Pa.), and later this month and next at spots around Southern California.
Advertisement
SPORTS
March 21, 1985 | JIM MURRAY
In an age when top stars of stage and screen were taking off their clothes to play scenes before millions of people all over the world, when convicted murderers were getting two-year sentences, when the public was making folk heroes out of two-bit safecrackers, when songs were being written and movies were being made about moronic gunmen of the old West, the commissioner of all baseball one day moved forthrightly to stamp out a major threat to our civilization.
OPINION
October 30, 2009 | By Wendy Murphy
The Times' Oct. 25 article, "How a girl's stark words got lost in the Polanski spectacle," is yet another piece about Roman Polanski's crimes that purports to be tough on the film director but instead adds to the public perception that what he did was no big deal. First, the story refers to the crime as an "alleged" rape. Polanski pleaded guilty to "unlawful sex with a minor," which is the crime of child rape in California. There is no need to use the word "alleged" anymore.
SPORTS
October 29, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
Mercifully, the New York Yankees wrapped up the World Series in four games, which means the Jim Gray lynch mob can now douse the torches, put away the pitchforks, take down the Web site and go home to retool for its next project, the abolition of the First Amendment. Nothing NBC's Gray asked Pete Rose during his fateful Sunday night interview was half as disturbing as the frenzied, frothing national reaction to it.
SPORTS
May 16, 1997 | MARK HEISLER
We don't get many of these legal fiascoes, so how to describe the NBA's action, in which it suspended the New York Knicks' top four scorers in the middle of the playoffs for their parts in a penny-ante scrum? Draconian? Looney Tunes? A bunch of macho lawyers on a power trip? As usual, the answer is D), all of the above. This wasn't a case of the punishment fitting the crime. In this case, the devastating punishment dwarfed the puny crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1997 | RICHARD WARCHOL and PENNY AREVALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He was busy in the yard, busy in the house. Back and forth, forth and back. In the garage, out of the garage. In the house, out of the house. Ah, the bliss of household chores on a day off. Problem was, the next time Dan Christian went to ride his bike, it was long gone, snagged by yet another opportunistic burglar in the few minutes Christian was in the backyard. Reducing the risk of burglary seems simple enough: Close the garage door, lock the windows, get a dog or stronger locks.
OPINION
October 30, 2009 | By Wendy Murphy
The Times' Oct. 25 article, "How a girl's stark words got lost in the Polanski spectacle," is yet another piece about Roman Polanski's crimes that purports to be tough on the film director but instead adds to the public perception that what he did was no big deal. First, the story refers to the crime as an "alleged" rape. Polanski pleaded guilty to "unlawful sex with a minor," which is the crime of child rape in California. There is no need to use the word "alleged" anymore.
OPINION
October 27, 2002
Re Winona Ryder and the alleged shoplifting (Oct. 23): It seems that the real crime is that so few items could cost $6,000! Katie Shiban Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1992
I think we in the Valley should raise a subscription to buy a car for Wayne Hamilton of Studio City, the disabled veteran whose car was stolen, as reported in his letter published in The Times Valley Edition June 14. I think we could donate $100 to $150 each. This is a real crime in the community, and if we all get together we can fix it. ROBERT GREEN, Sherman Oaks
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2008 | Cristy Lytal, Special to The Times
When Kimberlee Heale was a little girl growing up in Covina and San Diego, she used to ask her father, a firefighter, to describe traffic accidents. By the time she took a tour of the FBI Crime Lab as an eighth-grader, she knew that a career in forensics was for her. "It was just the whole idea behind being able to put pieces of a puzzle together to figure out what somebody did," she says. "It was pretty interesting to me."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
AT THE Cannes Film Festival, there are tales of cat burglars, violent street fights, car robberies and even a pepper-sprayed mogul. But instead of events experienced on the big screen, they are real-life assaults on festival-goers, who often find themselves pressed to keep it all very hush-hush. The international cinema showcase, which runs today through May 25, is known for its star-jammed red carpets and black-tie premieres. Private jets offload the Hollywood elite, luxury yachts fill the bay, and stars and movie financiers party until dawn, drawing bandits like moths to a flame.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Fun With Dick & Jane" plays like the setup for a movie that never materializes. It has all the elements for a successful comedy, but once the premise is presented, the film doesn't know how to deliver on its promise. That doesn't mean there is no fun in "Fun."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2003
Re "The Last Word," by Baz Dreisinger (Aug. 31): I am the former "Death Row Madam" and author of the autobiography titled "Death Row Madam." I hope "Civil Brand" (obviously a takeoff on the Sybil Brand Institute, where I was held before my incarceration in prison) will not be just another prison story for the purpose of lining a filmmaker's pockets. I hope it will go for the bigger picture -- to inform the public about the corrupt legal system and the abuse of inmates in the state prison systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2002
EVERY time I'd tell one of my friends that Michael Jackson was once again on the L.A. airways, they were unaware he was back. Yes, let the market decide, as Jess Cortland asked in his letter (Nov. 30) -- but KLAC-AM did almost no promotion of his show, and that's the real crime. To me, Jackson will always be the quintessential talk show host. Let's hope he finds a home in L.A. soon with a station that can promote and nurture his brand of "intelligent talk." Mark Winkler Los Angeles
OPINION
October 27, 2002
Re Winona Ryder and the alleged shoplifting (Oct. 23): It seems that the real crime is that so few items could cost $6,000! Katie Shiban Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1996
O.J. Simpson is given a not-guilty verdict. Richard Ramirez is allowed to wed while serving a life sentence for multiple murders and a seriously "bad cop," Roger M. "Hoot" Gibson (Dec. 18), is awarded a small fortune, including a pension, for society's injustices. How many times must man be slapped in the face before he realizes that the real crime is in not reforming a justice system that screams for resurfacing? STUART A. CANNOLD Palmdale
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2002
EVERY time I'd tell one of my friends that Michael Jackson was once again on the L.A. airways, they were unaware he was back. Yes, let the market decide, as Jess Cortland asked in his letter (Nov. 30) -- but KLAC-AM did almost no promotion of his show, and that's the real crime. To me, Jackson will always be the quintessential talk show host. Let's hope he finds a home in L.A. soon with a station that can promote and nurture his brand of "intelligent talk." Mark Winkler Los Angeles
OPINION
October 13, 2002 | Jonathan Turley
Last week, a court in Florida issued a clear command to members of the clergy: When it comes to juries, thou shall not serve. In a victory that has attracted national attention, prosecutors convinced an appellate court that members of the clergy may be stricken by prosecutors as inherently too soft on defendants. The clergy is not alone. Across the country, a debate rages over which groups can be constitutionally stricken from juries. The Rev.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2002 | MARK CARO, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Question: Which of the following is not the plot of a movie in production or development? (a) A female investigator hunts a serial killer whose victims are her past boyfriends. (b) An FBI agent hunts a serial killer who may be his colleague. (c) An FBI agent hunts a serial killer who may be his identical twin. (d) A student interviews a serial killer to help him get into Harvard's psychology program.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|