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BUSINESS
January 1, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1994, the best U.S. economic growth in perhaps 10 years begot the worst stock market since 1990 and the worst bond market in more than 60 years. Little wonder Wall Street so fears what the economy might do for an encore in '95. The seeming paradox--bullish times for business and workers equating with bearish times for financial markets--remains the focus of investor debate and concern worldwide as the new year dawns.
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OPINION
April 30, 2012
Re "Lehman elite stood to get $700 million," April 27 "The numbers are shocking but consistent withthe fact that in some ways Wall Street has been run asa casino for extracting money from the real economy and using it to pay extraordinary high levels of compensation. " This quote by Lisa Donner of Americans for Financial Reform in The Times' article on Lehman Bros. aptly sums up what is wrong with Wall Street. This has been Wall Street since the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act; it still is a gambling enterprise.
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OPINION
December 27, 2009 | By Robert B. Reich
In September 2008, as the worst of the financial crisis engulfed Wall Street, George W. Bush issued a warning: "This sucker could go down." Around the same time, as Congress hashed out a bailout bill, New Hampshire Sen. Judd Gregg, the leading Republican negotiator of the bill, warned that "if we do not do this, the trauma, the chaos and the disruption to everyday Americans' lives will be overwhelming, and that's a price we can't afford to risk paying."...
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Vista), the conservative Californian who has moved into the national limelight as a sharp stick in the side of the Obama administration,  endorsed former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's presidential bid, it was announced Thursday. The endorsement is the latest among congressional Republicans as Romney seeks to solidify the establishment GOP in his fight with Texas Gov. Rick Perry, the front-runner for the Republican nomination according to most polls. “As someone who shares my background in business, Congressman Issa understands that we need to make fundamental changes in Washington,” Romney said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Vista), the conservative Californian who has moved into the national limelight as a sharp stick in the side of the Obama administration,  endorsed former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's presidential bid, it was announced Thursday. The endorsement is the latest among congressional Republicans as Romney seeks to solidify the establishment GOP in his fight with Texas Gov. Rick Perry, the front-runner for the Republican nomination according to most polls. “As someone who shares my background in business, Congressman Issa understands that we need to make fundamental changes in Washington,” Romney said in a prepared statement.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Hollywood has made a film called "Wall Street" about stockbrokers, raiders and inside traders that is loosely based on the illegal activities of arbitrageur Ivan Boesky and investment banker Martin Siegel that came to light a year ago. It's a pretty good movie, about a young stockbroker who learns from working for an unprincipled rascal that it's a tough, cruel world out there. The villain comes across better than the hero, and some of the financial doings are realistic.
OPINION
April 30, 2012
Re "Lehman elite stood to get $700 million," April 27 "The numbers are shocking but consistent withthe fact that in some ways Wall Street has been run asa casino for extracting money from the real economy and using it to pay extraordinary high levels of compensation. " This quote by Lisa Donner of Americans for Financial Reform in The Times' article on Lehman Bros. aptly sums up what is wrong with Wall Street. This has been Wall Street since the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act; it still is a gambling enterprise.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1994 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Panic is caused by unstable prices and short memory. Turmoil in the financial markets is leading otherwise sensible people to lose their balance and to doubt the strength of the real economy. The Federal Reserve Board is criticized for acting too quickly or too slowly on interest rates; inflation or recession or both are coming, cry the doomsayers. Reality is more complex and encouraging.
NEWS
December 20, 1985 | Associated Press
The U.S. economy grew a sluggish 2.4% in 1985, the weakest rate since the recession year of 1982, the government reported today. The Commerce Department said growth in the gross national product, the broadest measure of the nation's economic health, was down substantially from the 6.6% increase posted in 1984. For the last three months of this year, the economy is growing at an estimated annual rate of 3.2%, according to an initial "flash" calculation released today.
OPINION
January 17, 1988 | Stuart K. Spencer, Stuart K. Spencer served as senior campaign adviser to Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984
Republicans can look at their party's chances in the 1988 presidential election with a degree of confidence. The underlying economy is good, unemployment is down, the country is at peace and the President has just signed a U.S.-Soviet nuclear weapons reduction treaty. Confidence--not cockiness--for we are not running Ronald Reagan. Republicans should never be cocky; there are less of us than there are Democrats, who, if they ever get their act together, can give us a lot of trouble.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2011 | Tom Petruno, Market Beat
America is getting good at muddling through. That was the economy's disheartening growth story in the first half of 2011. Things may not look much different in the second half. It's hard to concede as much, this being the world's largest economy. We don't want to muddle. We want to soar, like in the old days. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke doesn't want the U.S. to be doomed to muddling, which is why he had the Fed create $600 billion from thin air in the last seven months to buy more Treasury bonds.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2010 | Tom Petruno, Market Beat
The U.S. economy keeps climbing out of the deep hole left by the financial crash and the Great Recession that followed. But the recovery's benefits have been dispensed unevenly, to say the least ? which is why many Americans don't believe things have improved, and lack faith that 2011 will bring better times. Those doubts, however, could have a silver lining: The bar is low for what might constitute good news that could feed on itself and give the economy significant momentum.
OPINION
December 27, 2009 | By Robert B. Reich
In September 2008, as the worst of the financial crisis engulfed Wall Street, George W. Bush issued a warning: "This sucker could go down." Around the same time, as Congress hashed out a bailout bill, New Hampshire Sen. Judd Gregg, the leading Republican negotiator of the bill, warned that "if we do not do this, the trauma, the chaos and the disruption to everyday Americans' lives will be overwhelming, and that's a price we can't afford to risk paying."...
BUSINESS
September 10, 2002
The National Assn. of Industrial and Office Properties will host an evening forum on real estate and the economy Thursday at the Peninsula Hotel in Beverly Hills. Featured speakers include John Long of Highridge Partners, Robert Lowe of Lowe Enterprises, Ron Sturzenegger of Banc of America Securities, Richard Ziman of Arden Realty and Ethan Penner, formerly of Kennedy Wilson. The event will begin at 6 p.m. Admission for nonmembers is $195. For information, call (714) 979-9131.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1998 | TOM PETRUNO
Somebody's borrowing a lot of money from U.S. banks, belying the idea of a credit crunch. But is the money going to the borrowers who need it most? Federal Reserve data show that total credit extended by commercial banks has jumped sharply since late summer, even amid rising concerns that global markets' turmoil would cause banks to turn much more conservative in their lending. Total bank credit outstanding has leaped to $4.5 trillion from $4.3 trillion in late July, seasonally adjusted.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A sudden major leap in mortgage rates--a direct result of the tumult in global financial markets--is jolting lenders and upsetting the plans of many consumers across the country who were on the verge of buying homes or refinancing their real estate loans. The rise over the last few days, lifting mortgage rates in some cases by well over half a percentage point, could kill many pending deals and, in other cases, force consumers to pay more than they anticipated.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2011 | Tom Petruno, Market Beat
America is getting good at muddling through. That was the economy's disheartening growth story in the first half of 2011. Things may not look much different in the second half. It's hard to concede as much, this being the world's largest economy. We don't want to muddle. We want to soar, like in the old days. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke doesn't want the U.S. to be doomed to muddling, which is why he had the Fed create $600 billion from thin air in the last seven months to buy more Treasury bonds.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2010 | Tom Petruno, Market Beat
The U.S. economy keeps climbing out of the deep hole left by the financial crash and the Great Recession that followed. But the recovery's benefits have been dispensed unevenly, to say the least ? which is why many Americans don't believe things have improved, and lack faith that 2011 will bring better times. Those doubts, however, could have a silver lining: The bar is low for what might constitute good news that could feed on itself and give the economy significant momentum.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economists, investment strategists and even individual investors count on the financial markets to send intelligible signals about the direction of the broader economy. But what is the Dow Jones industrial average trying to say when it plunges nearly 300 points in a couple of hours, then rebounds to finish the day off less than 10 points--which is exactly what happened Thursday? The same question might be asked of the recently mighty U.S.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1994, the best U.S. economic growth in perhaps 10 years begot the worst stock market since 1990 and the worst bond market in more than 60 years. Little wonder Wall Street so fears what the economy might do for an encore in '95. The seeming paradox--bullish times for business and workers equating with bearish times for financial markets--remains the focus of investor debate and concern worldwide as the new year dawns.
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