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Real Estate Fraud California

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1996 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An obscure state agency charged with regulating land sales has come under fire from an influential legislator, consumer advocates and real estate experts since the Marshall Redman land-fraud case came to light. Assembly Minority Leader Richard Katz (D-Sylmar) said legislators are considering new laws to better protect consumers from real estate fraud. Katz has suggested a review of the actions of the state Department of Real Estate in the Redman case.
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NEWS
November 18, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was nothing Cari Magnan enjoyed more than reclining in the Jacuzzi bathtub with a glass of champagne while gazing at the Pacific through the picture window of the plush three-bedroom home. The carpet was teal, the floors marble, and best of all for the unemployed Magnan, it was practically free. The Dana Point house, like tens of thousands in California, was in the limbo that precedes foreclosure. The owner had walked away, the home was empty and the mortgage holder had not yet taken over.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a written report to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti said his office "acted appropriately and promptly to protect the public and the innocent victims who lost money" to developer Marshall Redman, now facing fraud and theft charges in connection with his sale of high desert property. "Our investigation of Redman is ongoing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1996 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An obscure state agency charged with regulating land sales has come under fire from an influential legislator, consumer advocates and real estate experts since the Marshall Redman land-fraud case came to light. Assembly Minority Leader Richard Katz (D-Sylmar) said legislators are considering new laws to better protect consumers from real estate fraud. Katz has suggested a review of the actions of the state Department of Real Estate in the Redman case.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was nothing Cari Magnan enjoyed more than reclining in the Jacuzzi bathtub with a glass of champagne while gazing at the Pacific through the picture window of the plush three-bedroom home. The carpet was teal, the floors marble, and best of all for the unemployed Magnan, it was practically free. The Dana Point house, like tens of thousands in California, was in the limbo that precedes foreclosure. The owner had walked away, the home was empty and the mortgage holder had not yet taken over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti's written explanation Tuesday of why his office didn't press charges against developer Marshall Redman until last month was not good enough for three county supervisors, who said they want him to appear in person before the board. "This is insufficient," said Supervisor Gloria Molina, referring to a two-page memorandum delivered Tuesday to the five supervisors. "No, this does not satisfy me."
BUSINESS
May 4, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tri-State Financial Charged With Defrauding Investors: The Los Angeles County district attorney charged six Southern California business people with defrauding more than 400 investors of $25 million in a deal involving commercial real estate investments.
REAL ESTATE
October 15, 1995
In a move that's expected to help reduce real estate fraud, California has become the first state to require all property deed signers to leave a thumbprint in the notary public's journal. The law, passed unanimously by the Legislature and signed earlier this month by Gov. Pete Wilson, expands throughout the state a successful three-year Los Angeles County pilot program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1994 | E. J. GONG JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year, nearly 1,200 letters poured into the Orange County district attorney's office's Consumer Protection Unit. People complained about dishonest mechanics, unlicensed doctors, phony sale prices advertised by department stores and even a Huntington Beach taco stand that was accused of skimping on the beef in its "macho" burrito. And prosecutors say the number of complaints has increased as Southern California's recession persists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2005 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors said the scam worked like this: The suspects located homeowners whose loans were in default and persuaded them that they could avoid foreclosure with a short-term loan to cover their debts. The victims were told that their homes would be refinanced by "co-signers" with good credit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a written report to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti said his office "acted appropriately and promptly to protect the public and the innocent victims who lost money" to developer Marshall Redman, now facing fraud and theft charges in connection with his sale of high desert property. "Our investigation of Redman is ongoing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti's written explanation Tuesday of why his office didn't press charges against developer Marshall Redman until last month was not good enough for three county supervisors, who said they want him to appear in person before the board. "This is insufficient," said Supervisor Gloria Molina, referring to a two-page memorandum delivered Tuesday to the five supervisors. "No, this does not satisfy me."
BUSINESS
May 4, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tri-State Financial Charged With Defrauding Investors: The Los Angeles County district attorney charged six Southern California business people with defrauding more than 400 investors of $25 million in a deal involving commercial real estate investments.
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