Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReal Estate Fraud Southern California
IN THE NEWS

Real Estate Fraud Southern California

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 5, 1995
An alleged rent-skimming scheme under investigation by federal authorities has featured massive property transfers to people who have just filed for bankruptcy. Authorities say participants get deeds to properties in foreclosure by promising homeowners to make their loans current or renegotiate with the lender. Instead, the scammers allegedly rent the homes and delay foreclosure by putting fractional shares of the properties in the names of people in bankruptcy, or about to file.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles developer Marshall Redman was sentenced to jail Monday for leading a massive land swindle that defrauded as many as 2,500 buyers and escaped the reach of local and state authorities for years. Many of his victims ended up living in makeshift homes on undeveloped land in the High Desert, with no running water or electricity. Redman sold the properties to his mostly Spanish-speaking clients on false promises that utilities and other improvements were coming.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
February 5, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling it the worst case of bankruptcy abuse he has ever seen, a federal judge in Santa Ana on Tuesday imposed a stiff fine on a controversial real estate entrepreneur who is the focus of a long-running fraud investigation by the FBI and U.S. attorney in Los Angeles. Bankruptcy Court Judge John E. Ryan ordered Bernard Gross to pay more than $85,000 in sanctions for filing a sham bankruptcy petition in August--the 15th bankruptcy filing by Gross since the early 1980s. In an affidavit filed in U.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling it the worst case of bankruptcy abuse he has ever seen, a federal judge in Santa Ana on Tuesday imposed a stiff fine on a controversial real estate entrepreneur who is the focus of a long-running fraud investigation by the FBI and U.S. attorney in Los Angeles. Bankruptcy Court Judge John E. Ryan ordered Bernard Gross to pay more than $85,000 in sanctions for filing a sham bankruptcy petition in August--the 15th bankruptcy filing by Gross since the early 1980s. In an affidavit filed in U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles developer Marshall Redman was sentenced to jail Monday for leading a massive land swindle that defrauded as many as 2,500 buyers and escaped the reach of local and state authorities for years. Many of his victims ended up living in makeshift homes on undeveloped land in the High Desert, with no running water or electricity. Redman sold the properties to his mostly Spanish-speaking clients on false promises that utilities and other improvements were coming.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one would accuse Bernard Gross of lacking entrepreneurial zeal. The bearded, rotund real estate whiz built a vast portfolio of rental properties by getting people throughout Southern California to deed him their houses for free. But rather than winning points for ingenuity, Gross instead is the focus of a long-running fraud investigation by the FBI and the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 5, 1995
An alleged rent-skimming scheme under investigation by federal authorities has featured massive property transfers to people who have just filed for bankruptcy. Authorities say participants get deeds to properties in foreclosure by promising homeowners to make their loans current or renegotiate with the lender. Instead, the scammers allegedly rent the homes and delay foreclosure by putting fractional shares of the properties in the names of people in bankruptcy, or about to file.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one would accuse Bernard Gross of lacking entrepreneurial zeal. The bearded, rotund real estate whiz built a vast portfolio of rental properties by getting people throughout Southern California to deed him their houses for free. But rather than winning points for ingenuity, Gross instead is the focus of a long-running fraud investigation by the FBI and the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|