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Real Estate Fraud

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors charged two real estate speculators Thursday with fraud, alleging they engineered a mortgage scheme that ultimately created one of Orange County's most notorious apartment slums. The U.S. attorney's office said the men caused the Haster Gardens apartment complex to default on $8.3 million in loans and go into foreclosure. That triggered its slide into a state of disrepair, according to court documents.
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REAL ESTATE
January 14, 2001 | DIANE WEDNER
A 24-hour real estate hotline is now available to homeowners seeking protection from fraudulent contractors, "foreclosure consultants," phony lenders and equity purchasers, and other property scams. One of the more common frauds involves "foreclosure consultants," who pretend to save one's home by getting the owners to sign "routine" papers to stop the foreclosure. The paperwork actually transfers the property title to the bogus consultant.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | RICHARD T. COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It went into the history books as "Whitewater," the name of a peaceful river in the Ozark mountains on which Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton and their business partners hoped to sell dozens of rustic home sites. As the name for one of the murkiest and most complex scandals in political history, it should have been called the "Big Muddy." By the time independent counsel Robert W.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the clearest sign to date that Kenneth W. Starr is about to resign as independent counsel, a panel of appellate court judges Wednesday interviewed five of his deputies behind closed doors to choose a successor to wrap up the five-year-long Whitewater investigation. The leading candidate was believed to be W. Hickman Ewing, a hard-driving veteran prosecutor from Memphis, Tenn.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1999 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alleged "queenpin" of a fraudulent Southern California home-loan business was denied a reduction in her $5-million bail Wednesday. She remained jailed in San Jose while criminal authorities continue searching for the fugitive head of the firm. Saying that she is a flight risk and noting that she is charged with preying on the elderly, a Santa Clara County judge denied the request of Sharon Palmer-Ross, 39, former vice president of Tri-Star Mortgage Co., of Woodland Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted swindler Marshall Redman, who duped 2,500 mostly low-income Latinos into purchasing homes on virtually useless land in the High Desert, began serving his sentence on Monday--but not behind bars. Redman pleaded no contest to grand theft and filing false documents in October, and was sentenced to a year in county jail. But a probation report deemed him eligible for "alternative confinement," meaning that he will serve his sentence in the comfort of his home.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Operating its real estate business out of a fried-chicken stand in Compton, no-frills Wolf River Holding Corp. has aroused more than a few suspicions. Last year, a team of local and federal agents raided the chicken stand as part of a long-running investigation into an alleged arson-for-profit ring involving fugitive businessman Kevin S. Merritt, who investigators say controls Wolf River.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move aimed at curbing abuses by dishonest home loan firms, two state agencies have launched an effort to keep mortgage brokers who are stripped of licenses by one department from obtaining a license from the other.
NEWS
October 27, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles developer Marshall Redman was sentenced to jail Monday for leading a massive land swindle that defrauded as many as 2,500 buyers and escaped the reach of local and state authorities for years. Many of his victims ended up living in makeshift homes on undeveloped land in the High Desert, with no running water or electricity. Redman sold the property to his mostly Spanish-speaking clients on false promises that utilities and other improvements were coming.
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