Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReal Estate Industry China
IN THE NEWS

Real Estate Industry China

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 16, 1993 | From Reuters
China has announced strict measures to halt chaotic property speculation, including an outright ban on projects such as golf courses and horse-racing tracks. "There will be no approval of, no license, no land and no loan for such expensive projects as horse race tracks and golf courses," said the State Council, China's cabinet.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zhang Jingfeng, a 51-year-old accountant, wends her way through several shops along Shanghai's Jin Lin Road looking at tiles, cabinets, kitchenware and bathroom fixtures. She and her family recently realized a lifelong dream when they bought a two-bedroom apartment for $59,250 with savings, a company grant and a sizable mortgage. Now they're spending $12,350 to renovate the kitchen and bathroom in a bet that the market will go up and eventually make it a good investment.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 19, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Real Estate Irregularities Cost Country Billions, Paper Says: China's property market is characterized by disorderly, illegal and arbitrarily priced land transactions, costing the state as much as $2.3 billion annually in lost revenue, according to the official Economic Information Daily. The newspaper said some local leaders abuse their powers by approving as many as 500,000 "hidden" land sales a year, with some property even given away free.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The number of changes China is attempting to make all at once in its economy is astounding. It is going from central planning to a market economy, from state-owned companies funded without question by state-owned banks to tough-minded commercial banks and listings on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zhang Jingfeng, a 51-year-old accountant, wends her way through several shops along Shanghai's Jin Lin Road looking at tiles, cabinets, kitchenware and bathroom fixtures. She and her family recently realized a lifelong dream when they bought a two-bedroom apartment for $59,250 with savings, a company grant and a sizable mortgage. Now they're spending $12,350 to renovate the kitchen and bathroom in a bet that the market will go up and eventually make it a good investment.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1992 | From Reuters
Few people would complain about a rise of $1 in their monthly rent. But for residents of China's capital, long used to paying pennies, housing reform is the first real crack in the iron rice bowl--a socialist cradle-to-grave welfare system that takes care of the people at the expense of state finances.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The delegation from China's Ministry of Construction strolled through the model homes here, knocking on walls, peering inside cabinets and generally soaking up all the amenities of the upscale Southern California development. Their unanimous verdict: Americans "have a very good standard of living."
BUSINESS
September 5, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
Hong Kong, watch carefully: This is how China might act when it inherits some of Hong Kong's valuable government property in 1997 after taking over the British colony. Shanghai's municipal government has decided to lease some of the most famous, and potentially most prestigious, waterfront property in the world. And it is taking its time to make sure it gets things right. The 37 buildings in question sit on the curving western bank of the Huangpu River.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1993 | PRADNYA JOSHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until recently, a posh real estate development such as Laiwu Bay Vacation Village, planned for a site near Shantou in China's Guangdong Province, would have been unthinkable. But Zheng Zhuqin, a Chinese real estate manager visiting Los Angeles recently, said his state-owned company is aggressively developing the southern coastal resort, complete with luxurious villas, department stores and recreational facilities.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1993 | From Reuters
China's up-and-coming money men, having sent the country's novice stock markets lurching between boom and bust, are now "cooking the ground"--feverishly speculating in real estate. From tropical Hainan island in the south to the industrial rust belt of the north, speculators everywhere in China are "chao dipi," which literally translates as "frying up the ground."
BUSINESS
March 12, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The delegation from China's Ministry of Construction strolled through the model homes here, knocking on walls, peering inside cabinets and generally soaking up all the amenities of the upscale Southern California development. Their unanimous verdict: Americans "have a very good standard of living."
BUSINESS
September 19, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Real Estate Irregularities Cost Country Billions, Paper Says: China's property market is characterized by disorderly, illegal and arbitrarily priced land transactions, costing the state as much as $2.3 billion annually in lost revenue, according to the official Economic Information Daily. The newspaper said some local leaders abuse their powers by approving as many as 500,000 "hidden" land sales a year, with some property even given away free.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
Hong Kong, watch carefully: This is how China might act when it inherits some of Hong Kong's valuable government property in 1997 after taking over the British colony. Shanghai's municipal government has decided to lease some of the most famous, and potentially most prestigious, waterfront property in the world. And it is taking its time to make sure it gets things right. The 37 buildings in question sit on the curving western bank of the Huangpu River.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1993 | From Reuters
China has announced strict measures to halt chaotic property speculation, including an outright ban on projects such as golf courses and horse-racing tracks. "There will be no approval of, no license, no land and no loan for such expensive projects as horse race tracks and golf courses," said the State Council, China's cabinet.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1993 | PRADNYA JOSHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until recently, a posh real estate development such as Laiwu Bay Vacation Village, planned for a site near Shantou in China's Guangdong Province, would have been unthinkable. But Zheng Zhuqin, a Chinese real estate manager visiting Los Angeles recently, said his state-owned company is aggressively developing the southern coastal resort, complete with luxurious villas, department stores and recreational facilities.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1993 | From Reuters
China's up-and-coming money men, having sent the country's novice stock markets lurching between boom and bust, are now "cooking the ground"--feverishly speculating in real estate. From tropical Hainan island in the south to the industrial rust belt of the north, speculators everywhere in China are "chao dipi," which literally translates as "frying up the ground."
BUSINESS
April 19, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The number of changes China is attempting to make all at once in its economy is astounding. It is going from central planning to a market economy, from state-owned companies funded without question by state-owned banks to tough-minded commercial banks and listings on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1992 | From Reuters
Few people would complain about a rise of $1 in their monthly rent. But for residents of China's capital, long used to paying pennies, housing reform is the first real crack in the iron rice bowl--a socialist cradle-to-grave welfare system that takes care of the people at the expense of state finances.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|