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Real Estate Industry Hawaii

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NEWS
April 26, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
As anxious homeowners arrived at the Maunawili grade school gymnasium for a protest meeting in late March, they could see the handwriting on the wall--quite literally. There, handwritten on long scrolls of vanilla-colored paper, were the names of scores of familiar enterprises--Central Pacific Bank, Honolulu International Country Club--that had something significant in common: all had Japanese owners.
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NEWS
June 19, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For sale: The Hawaiian island of Lanai and assorted real estate on Oahu and the U.S. mainland. Price: About $316 million in cash, and the assumption of $273 million in loans. Sales pitch: If you buy the real estate holdings at market price, you may be able to sell off all the real estate except the island of Lanai to finance the transaction, winding up with a Hawaiian island for free.
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NEWS
March 20, 1997 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With her salt-and-pepper hair pulled neatly in a bun, Edith Kawaiulailiahi Mar doesn't look like a troublemaker. Her warm eyes and gentle face make her the quintessential Hawaiian grandma. But today she stands at the center of a ruckus in Hawaii's real estate industry that has disrupted property sales and is likely to cost her the home where she was born. Depending upon whom you ask, Mar is either the victim of a scam or a courageous individual trying to right a historical wrong.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1998 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American investors are jockeying to scoop up prestigious resorts in Hawaii at bargain-basement prices as banks pressure their debt-ridden Japanese owners to sell them. "The bank reforms that went into effect in Japan in April have really forced the issue," said Joseph Toy, director of real estate and hospitality consulting for Coopers & Lybrand in Honolulu. "There's long been talk about the [Japanese] Ministry of Finance being more adamant about divestiture of these troubled loans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities in California and Hawaii say they are investigating the role of a Palmdale woman for possible fraud in sales of raw desert land to 253 low-income investors, some of whom lost their life savings. The investigation centers on Carolina Acio Paredes, who was barred last year from selling real estate in Hawaii and whom California regulators accused earlier this month of continuing to engage in illegal high desert land sales, according to court records.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1998 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American investors are jockeying to scoop up prestigious resorts in Hawaii at bargain-basement prices as banks pressure their debt-ridden Japanese owners to sell them. "The bank reforms that went into effect in Japan in April have really forced the issue," said Joseph Toy, director of real estate and hospitality consulting for Coopers & Lybrand in Honolulu. "There's long been talk about the [Japanese] Ministry of Finance being more adamant about divestiture of these troubled loans.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For sale: The Hawaiian island of Lanai and assorted real estate on Oahu and the U.S. mainland. Price: About $316 million in cash, and the assumption of $273 million in loans. Sales pitch: If you buy the real estate holdings at market price, you may be able to sell off all the real estate except the island of Lanai to finance the transaction, winding up with a Hawaiian island for free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities in California and Hawaii say they are investigating the role of a Palmdale woman for possible fraud in sales of raw desert land to 253 low-income investors, some of whom lost their life savings. The investigation centers on Carolina Acio Paredes, who was barred last year from selling real estate in Hawaii and whom California regulators accused earlier this month of continuing to engage in illegal high desert land sales, according to court records.
NEWS
March 20, 1997 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With her salt-and-pepper hair pulled neatly in a bun, Edith Kawaiulailiahi Mar doesn't look like a troublemaker. Her warm eyes and gentle face make her the quintessential Hawaiian grandma. But today she stands at the center of a ruckus in Hawaii's real estate industry that has disrupted property sales and is likely to cost her the home where she was born. Depending upon whom you ask, Mar is either the victim of a scam or a courageous individual trying to right a historical wrong.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
As anxious homeowners arrived at the Maunawili grade school gymnasium for a protest meeting in late March, they could see the handwriting on the wall--quite literally. There, handwritten on long scrolls of vanilla-colored paper, were the names of scores of familiar enterprises--Central Pacific Bank, Honolulu International Country Club--that had something significant in common: all had Japanese owners.
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