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NEWS
May 2, 1991 | JOHN LAIDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last September, Robert DiGianflice received a jolt when his job as a security guard for a school and office complex was eliminated for cost reasons. But even worse than the initial surprise has been DiGianflice's inability, over the ensuing eight months, to find another job. "There is nothing out there that pays any kind of money," said DiGianflice as he waited to collect his unemployment check at a state jobs office. In fact, he said, the only jobs are temporary, low-paying ones.
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NEWS
May 2, 1991 | JOHN LAIDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last September, Robert DiGianflice received a jolt when his job as a security guard for a school and office complex was eliminated for cost reasons. But even worse than the initial surprise has been DiGianflice's inability, over the ensuing eight months, to find another job. "There is nothing out there that pays any kind of money," said DiGianflice as he waited to collect his unemployment check at a state jobs office. In fact, he said, the only jobs are temporary, low-paying ones.
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BUSINESS
January 8, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local unemployment rates are soaring and housing prices are sliding, but many Californians steadfastly maintain that "this is no New England." But are they overly optimistic? Is California primed for a Texas- or New England-style real estate disaster, where housing prices fell fast enough to endanger a large segment of the financial system and led to a collapse of a major bank like Bank of New England? Not likely, many economists say.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local unemployment rates are soaring and housing prices are sliding, but many Californians steadfastly maintain that "this is no New England." But are they overly optimistic? Is California primed for a Texas- or New England-style real estate disaster, where housing prices fell fast enough to endanger a large segment of the financial system and led to a collapse of a major bank like Bank of New England? Not likely, many economists say.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1990 | JONATHAN YENKIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In June, 1988, U.S. Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke told banks that aggressive uncontrolled expansion can lead to deep trouble. "Growth for growth's sake, or growth without the resources to back it up, is a highly risky strategy because it leaves the bank exposed when the economy turns down," he said.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1990 | JONATHAN YENKIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In June, 1988, U.S. Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke told banks that aggressive uncontrolled expansion can lead to deep trouble. "Growth for growth's sake, or growth without the resources to back it up, is a highly risky strategy because it leaves the bank exposed when the economy turns down," he said.
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