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NEWS
August 14, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph E. Ceretto has found his dream house. He speaks rapturously of its beautiful woodwork, ample basement and fireplace. He notes its proximity to parks, baseball diamonds, churches and a major shopping mall. As if all that were not enough, the three-bedroom, ranch-style house is selling for about 20% below the prices he would expect to pay elsewhere in Niagara Falls. "It's really an excellent home," says the 28-year-old substitute teacher, who is single and living with his parents.
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NEWS
November 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton became New York homeowners with the closing of the real estate deal on their house in Chappaqua. The sale of the $1.7-million home was completed at a Manhattan law firm, said a spokesman for the real estate firm that handled the transaction.
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NEWS
November 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton became New York homeowners with the closing of the real estate deal on their house in Chappaqua. The sale of the $1.7-million home was completed at a Manhattan law firm, said a spokesman for the real estate firm that handled the transaction.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Home-seekers flocked to the neighborhood surrounding the Love Canal toxic-waste dump Wednesday as a state agency put nine houses up for sale but refused to guarantee their safety in writing. "The area's been real quiet. It'll be nice to get neighbors back," said William Stevenson, one of about 70 people who stayed in the neighborhood rather than accept a government buyout during the late 1970s.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Home-seekers flocked to the neighborhood surrounding the Love Canal toxic-waste dump Wednesday as a state agency put nine houses up for sale but refused to guarantee their safety in writing. "The area's been real quiet. It'll be nice to get neighbors back," said William Stevenson, one of about 70 people who stayed in the neighborhood rather than accept a government buyout during the late 1970s.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER and SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As tycoon Donald J. Trump's financial troubles deepened this week, the Shakespeare & Co. bookstore in Manhattan set up a special display of Trump's "Art of the Deal" with a tin cup and a sign: "Brother, can you spare a dime?" The cup quickly filled up with coins and the store with "laughs and snickering," said Felice Rose, manager of the Upper West Side landmark. The reaction was typical. New Yorkers don't like to see a man down, you understand.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph E. Ceretto has found his dream house. He speaks rapturously of its beautiful woodwork, ample basement and fireplace. He notes its proximity to parks, baseball diamonds, churches and a major shopping mall. As if all that were not enough, the three-bedroom, ranch-style house is selling for about 20% below the prices he would expect to pay elsewhere in Niagara Falls. "It's really an excellent home," says the 28-year-old substitute teacher, who is single and living with his parents.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER and SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As tycoon Donald J. Trump's financial troubles deepened this week, the Shakespeare & Co. bookstore in Manhattan set up a special display of Trump's "Art of the Deal" with a tin cup and a sign: "Brother, can you spare a dime?" The cup quickly filled up with coins and the store with "laughs and snickering," said Felice Rose, manager of the Upper West Side landmark. The reaction was typical. New Yorkers don't like to see a man down, you understand.
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