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Real Estate Industry Northern California

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NEWS
May 13, 2000 | PETER H. KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To builders and boosters, more often than not, goes the privilege of naming a place. This town on the western flank of the San Joaquin Valley was founded 122 years ago as a railroad junction, and an official of the Central Pacific line seized the moment to honor an old friend back in Ohio, a grain merchant named Lathrop J. Tracy. Tracy himself never set foot in the town. One April day in 1918, however, a son, Rufus Tracy, was lured out for a visit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Monterey Peninsula's most affordable community just got a little more expensive. The Seaside real estate market is booming, and while it's still more affordable than Monterey and Carmel, it's not exactly a bargain. The median price of a home in Seaside jumped from $285,000 in March to $342,000 in May, said Sandy Haney, president of the Monterey County Assn. of Realtors. Seaside once had a reputation for high crime. But after the Army closed Ft.
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NEWS
June 30, 1997 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was the embodiment of well-heeled, this older woman in polished Ferragamo pumps, strolling through the historic Professorville neighborhood with her dapper, white-haired husband in tow. Her house was looking pretty fine too, as workers laid a new flagstone walk in front of the white-columned bungalow on this shady street of mullioned windows and fish-scaled shingles, quiet voices and quieter money. But wait.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Another indication that the economy in Northern California isn't what it used to be: The median price of a single-family home in ritzy Marin County plummeted $79,000 last month. That's the largest month-to-month decline in more than two years, according the county assessor's office. The May median was $620,000, down 11.3% from $699,000 in April. Industry analysts said it could be the first sign the housing market is softening.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For as long as anyone here can remember, this quaint waterfront hamlet on the north shore of San Francisco Bay has brandished a pair of infamous calling cards: the state's oldest prison fortress and its storied death row where condemned inmates have met their ends by hanging, poisoned syringe or the dreaded gas chamber.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Another indication that the economy in Northern California isn't what it used to be: The median price of a single-family home in ritzy Marin County plummeted $79,000 last month. That's the largest month-to-month decline in more than two years, according the county assessor's office. The May median was $620,000, down 11.3% from $699,000 in April. Industry analysts said it could be the first sign the housing market is softening.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Million-dollar homes might evoke images of white columns, expansive gardens and horse stables. But California's spectacular wealth creation has propelled the housing market so high that buyers might get no more than a 1,000-square-foot tract home for seven figures in some communities. A record 11,364 homes statewide fetched $1 million or more last year, a sales volume that represents a 51% increase from 1999.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two wealthy couples who anonymously bought a tiny Northern California coastal town have revealed their identities and described their plans to restore it. Lane DeVries, chief executive of Sun Valley Floral Farms in Arcata, his wife, Kathryn, local builder Dan Johnson and his wife, Kendra, kept their identities quiet until finalizing the deal last week with Seattle-based Simpson Timber Co., the former owner. They plan to preserve the historic character of the community of 300.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1993 | John O'Dell / Times staff writer
Looking Northward: Standard Pacific Corp., the publicly traded Costa Mesa home builder, says that while its Southern California division continues to suffer in the recession, particularly in San Diego County, it plans to look for land to buy in Northern California, where the economy is doing better than in the south, and in Ventura and Orange counties, where land prices have fallen as much as 50% from the heights of 1989.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | CHARLES PILLER and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There's no longer a waiting list for Porsche Boxsters at Carlsen Motors in Palo Alto. Some recent paper millionaires can't make house payments. And for the first time in years, cash invested in new Silicon Valley firms has slowed dramatically. The domino effect of Internet failures and a sharp slowdown in technology spending by many U.S. companies already has triggered one of the largest Nasdaq stock market meltdowns ever.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For as long as anyone here can remember, this quaint waterfront hamlet on the north shore of San Francisco Bay has brandished a pair of infamous calling cards: the state's oldest prison fortress and its storied death row where condemned inmates have met their ends by hanging, poisoned syringe or the dreaded gas chamber.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | CHARLES PILLER and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There's no longer a waiting list for Porsche Boxsters at Carlsen Motors in Palo Alto. Some recent paper millionaires can't make house payments. And for the first time in years, cash invested in new Silicon Valley firms has slowed dramatically. The domino effect of Internet failures and a sharp slowdown in technology spending by many U.S. companies already has triggered one of the largest Nasdaq stock market meltdowns ever.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Million-dollar homes might evoke images of white columns, expansive gardens and horse stables. But California's spectacular wealth creation has propelled the housing market so high that buyers might get no more than a 1,000-square-foot tract home for seven figures in some communities. A record 11,364 homes statewide fetched $1 million or more last year, a sales volume that represents a 51% increase from 1999.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two wealthy couples who anonymously bought a tiny Northern California coastal town have revealed their identities and described their plans to restore it. Lane DeVries, chief executive of Sun Valley Floral Farms in Arcata, his wife, Kathryn, local builder Dan Johnson and his wife, Kendra, kept their identities quiet until finalizing the deal last week with Seattle-based Simpson Timber Co., the former owner. They plan to preserve the historic character of the community of 300.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | PETER H. KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To builders and boosters, more often than not, goes the privilege of naming a place. This town on the western flank of the San Joaquin Valley was founded 122 years ago as a railroad junction, and an official of the Central Pacific line seized the moment to honor an old friend back in Ohio, a grain merchant named Lathrop J. Tracy. Tracy himself never set foot in the town. One April day in 1918, however, a son, Rufus Tracy, was lured out for a visit.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Several of the U.S.' largest real estate companies said they will form an Internet alliance based in the San Francisco Bay Area to take better advantage of the millions of people who live, work and shop in their properties. Simon Property Group Inc., Equity Residential Properties Inc. and Equity Office Properties Inc. are leading the 11-member group that will invest up to $135 million in the venture.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Several of the U.S.' largest real estate companies said they will form an Internet alliance based in the San Francisco Bay Area to take better advantage of the millions of people who live, work and shop in their properties. Simon Property Group Inc., Equity Residential Properties Inc. and Equity Office Properties Inc. are leading the 11-member group that will invest up to $135 million in the venture.
NEWS
June 30, 1997 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was the embodiment of well-heeled, this older woman in polished Ferragamo pumps, strolling through the historic Professorville neighborhood with her dapper, white-haired husband in tow. Her house was looking pretty fine too, as workers laid a new flagstone walk in front of the white-columned bungalow on this shady street of mullioned windows and fish-scaled shingles, quiet voices and quieter money. But wait.
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