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Real Estate Investment Orange County

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BUSINESS
July 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wires
When Japan's Tokyo Masuiwaya California Corp. snatched up the Dana Point Resort for about $104 million last year, it was playing a small role in a much-larger story that had foreign investors playing an ever bigger part in the U.S. economy. Foreign investors in 1989 continued to pour more money into the United States economy than Americans were investing abroad, and America's foreign debt burden surged 25% to $663.7 billion.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER
After years of focusing primarily on its beleaguered Bolsa Chica residential development in Huntington Beach, Koll Real Estate Group is once again buying and developing real estate in Orange County. It recently purchased Metro Center, a vacant four-story office building on Orangewood Avenue in Anaheim, from San Francisco lender Bar-K for $5 million.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investors in real estate developer Harold E. Tobin's housing projects alleged Monday that former bankers and contractors conspired with him to bilk them of more than $35 million. The investors, many of whom lost their life savings, detailed their charges in an expanded lawsuit that accuses Tobin, his wife, his son, his bankers and others of racketeering and conspiracy, as well as fraud and negligence.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investors in real estate developer Harold E. Tobin's housing projects alleged Monday that former bankers and contractors conspired with him to bilk them of more than $35 million. The investors, many of whom lost their life savings, detailed their charges in an expanded lawsuit that accuses Tobin, his wife, his son, his bankers and others of racketeering and conspiracy, as well as fraud and negligence.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER
After years of focusing primarily on its beleaguered Bolsa Chica residential development in Huntington Beach, Koll Real Estate Group is once again buying and developing real estate in Orange County. It recently purchased Metro Center, a vacant four-story office building on Orangewood Avenue in Anaheim, from San Francisco lender Bar-K for $5 million.
REAL ESTATE
January 8, 1989
Larry A. Hull, a Santa Clara-based property manager and real estate investment analyst, has been elected president of the California Apartment Assn., succeeding John West of Covina. Other officers are Hugh Smith, retired retail executive, Pasadena, president-elect; John Alioto, senior vice president, the Walters Management Co., San Diego, vice president; Dwight Long, president, Tri-Cal Investment & Management Co., Fresno, secretary, and Robert A.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Japanese developer said Tuesday that it will build $400 million in office towers, shops, a hotel and housing north of Santa Ana's downtown in one of the largest real estate developments in the city. The complex will include a 32-story office building that would be Orange County's tallest. The project forges another link in the massive redevelopment of Santa Ana's aging Main Street, which runs from the southern edge of the city to its northern boundary. Shimizu America Corp.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Japanese developer unveiled plans Tuesday to build $400 million worth of office towers, shops, a hotel and housing north of Santa Ana's downtown in one of the largest real estate developments in the city. The project, if approved and completed, will forge another link in the massive redevelopment of Santa Ana's aging Main Street, which runs between the city's northern and southern boundaries. Under current plans, Shimizu America Corp.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wires
When Japan's Tokyo Masuiwaya California Corp. snatched up the Dana Point Resort for about $104 million last year, it was playing a small role in a much-larger story that had foreign investors playing an ever bigger part in the U.S. economy. Foreign investors in 1989 continued to pour more money into the United States economy than Americans were investing abroad, and America's foreign debt burden surged 25% to $663.7 billion.
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