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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Sammi Kane Kraft, whose real-life baseball skills landed her the role of the pitching ace in the only film she ever made, 2005's "Bad News Bears," died early Tuesday in a car accident in Los Angeles. She was 20. She was a passenger in an Audi that was speeding on the westbound 10 Freeway near Crenshaw Boulevard about 1:30 a.m. when it rear-ended a big rig and was then struck by another car, according to the California Highway Patrol. Kraft was pronounced dead at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said her brother, Frankie Kraft.
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BOOKS
March 27, 1994 | RICHARD EDER
In 1930 a young Romanian came to Calcutta to live and study with a renowned Indian philosopher. He fell passionately in love with the philosopher's 16-year-old daughter, Maitreyi, herself a poet and disciple of Rabindranath Tagore. Eventually their love was discovered and the young man was thrown out of the house. Three years later Mircea Eliade--who was to become widely known as a writer, philosopher and historian of religions--published a highly charged novel about his experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2007
RYAN GOSLING'S feelings for Bianca, a lifelike/life-sized silicone doll in "Lars and the Real Girl" brings to my mind a play, "KRZY" by Bruce Reisman, that we did at the Second Stage in Hollywood in the late '80s. My character, Arthur, was in love with a life-sized doll named Mary Ann. I experienced the same sort of bond with her as Gosling did with Bianca. I wonder if "Real Girl's" writer, Nancy Oliver, saw our play or has/had some sort of symbiotic relationship with Reisman?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1994 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Despite an impressive vocal cast that includes Ruby Dee and Linda Lavin, "Whitewash," an animated special on HBO dealing with the issue of racism among children, is more notable for its good intentions than its effectiveness. Based on a real incident, "Whitewash" focuses on Helene Angel (Serena Henry), an African American fourth-grader who is attacked by a street gang on the way home from school. The gang members spray her face with white shoe polish to "make her white for a day."
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | DAN MORAIN and MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writers
Laura Black came home to find a letter wedged in her door. Hand-lettered across the front was a warning, "You'd better read this." She knew who it was from, an unwanted suitor named Richard Farley. Black had told him she did not want to see him, but he pursued her, confronted her, harassed her--at work and at home. She moved and he found her. She got an unlisted telephone number so he called her at work. She asked her employer to stop him from loitering near her car and he moved across the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
METAIRIE, La. - In the summer of 1992, an aspiring filmmaker named Craig Borten drove from Los Angeles to Dallas to see a man named Ron Woodroof. Borten was just a few years out of Syracuse University and didn't know what kind of movies he wanted to make, or if he wanted to make them at all. But he'd read about Woodroof, a fast-living - and, as it happened, deeply homophobic - straight electrician and rodeo habitue who had been diagnosed with AIDS in 1986. First out of self-preservation and then as a grudging crusade, Woodroof began smuggling unapproved drugs from Mexico and other countries, prolonging his life and the lives of thousands of others.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
Nancy Oliver, the writer of "Lars and the Real Girl," and Ronald Harwood, who wrote "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," shared the feature film award Wednesday at the annual Humanitas Prizes, which honor film and TV scripts that "explore the human condition . . . and reveal our common humanity." Television winners included Daniel Giat for the HBO movie "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee," Kirk Ellis for the opening chapter of the HBO miniseries "John Adams," Dave Tennant for an episode of NBC's "Scrubs" called "My Long Goodbye," Brian Hohlfeld for an episode of "My Friends Tigger & Pooh" and Ann Austen, Douglas Sloan, Max Enscoe and Annie DeYoung for "Johnny Kapahala: Back on Board."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2010
Dadetown 1995 IFC 9:10 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. The Sixth Sense 1999 Starz 10:30 a.m. Bowfinger 1999 Comedy Central 11 a.m. Bram Stoker's Dracula 1992 AMC 12:15 p.m. The River Wild 1994 Cinemax 12:30 p.m. Lemon Tree 2008 Sundance 1 p.m. My Cousin Vinny 1992 Encore 2:15 p.m. The Great Debaters 2007 TMC 2:50 p.m. Medicine for Melancholy 2008 Showtime 3 p.m. Murder, My Sweet 1944 TCM 3:15 p.m. Marley &...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
James Franco is an actor-turned-artist-turned-author-turned-actor-playing-an-artist-named-Franco in the soap opera "General Hospital" — who has made a movie, "Francophrenia," that documents the experience. He's about as "meta" as it gets. Now Franco has brought his knack for melding pop culture and fine art in unorthodox ways to a new exhibition for Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art. "Rebel," which opens Tuesday, is a high-concept group show that is a loose, interpretive ode to the 1955 James Dean film "Rebel Without a Cause.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Sean Penn's "Into the Wild" received a leading seven nominations for the Critics' Choice Awards, announced Tuesday by the Broadcast Film Critics Assn. "Juno" got six nominations, and "Atonement," "Michael Clayton," "No Country for Old Men," "Sweeney Todd" and "Hairspray" tied with five each. The 13th annual awards will be presented during a live VH1 broadcast Jan. 7, with D.L. Hughley as host. The Broadcast Film Critics Assn.
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