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Real Hero

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1996 | MACK REED and SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five days after gunfire ended his life, family, friends and fellow officers wept Monday as Ventura County Sheriff's Deputy Peter John Aguirre Jr. was laid to rest in the town where he was born. His was the second Southern California police funeral in a week, after slain CHP Officer Don J. Burt's on Friday, and the third in Ventura County in a year. "I've been to too many of these," Ontario Police Det.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Karin Klein
There's a Facebook campaign afoot to persuade Christian Bale to visit the children of Aurora, Colo., in the hospital, wearing his Batman costume. Sometimes, it's a good idea to ignore your fans. The idea is supposed to be to cheer up the injured young victims of "The Dark Knight Rises" shootings. It's nice that people are thinking of doing something for the kids, but a Batman visit sounds like about the least comforting way to go about it, something more likely to frighten and upset children whose most recent view of the character occurred under almost unimaginably traumatic circumstances.
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SPORTS
May 25, 2001 | DIANE PUCIN
This is the best time ever for Shaquille O'Neal. He is playing fabulous basketball. He has become a wise and witty spokesman for his Lakers. He is funny and insightful, at the same time. The Lakers can't seem to lose. Shaq is a happy hero. But Shaq would also want us to meet his cousin, Lawrence Webb. Shaq loved Webb, Lawrence's mother, Sarah Webb, said. Shaq understood, Sarah said, "that Lawrence is a real hero too." Lawrence Webb died at 37 Tuesday while fighting a fire.
SPORTS
September 20, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
He first appears in the movie as he first appeared with the Dodgers, a wallflower pulled reluctantly into the spotlight, a nerd suddenly tapped on the shoulder by the cool kids. The character that is supposed to be Paul DePodesta is a rumpled and bespectacled figure leaning against a wall whispering trade vetoes to a Cleveland Indians colleague. The character that is supposed to be Billy Beane openly wonders who he is, and why everyone thinks he's so smart, and so begins a journey that Dodgers fans will instantly and painfully recognize.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2006 | Tribune Media Services
Somewhere deep inside many ordinary human beings lies an inner superhero who longs to do good deeds, right wrongs, defeat evil and save the world. But unless one happens to become a soldier or cop or firefighter or nurse or ER doctor -- or is bitten by a radioactive spider or bombarded by gamma rays -- that cape and tights often remain safely tucked away. Comic-book legend Stan Lee wants to get the spandex out of the closet. On Thursday at 9 p.m.
NEWS
June 12, 1996 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
Two years ago, the bodies of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman were found on that sidewalk in Brentwood, igniting an extraordinary national discussion about heroes, about celebrity, about justice. The O.J. Simpson murder trial became a perverse sort of national pastime, moving most of us to far greater passion than a slow game on an emerald diamond ever could. In the Hayn household in Santa Monica, they are passionate about baseball. And they were also passionate about the Simpson trial.
SPORTS
August 19, 2007 | T.J. SIMERS
So I spent much of Saturday putting together a "these people live among you" column, becoming more and more depressed by the minute before going in a completely different direction. I had gone to Las Vegas, asked Kobe Bryant a series of questions about the questions that he had raised about his future with the Lakers and was now reading e-mail from people who were really ticked off because I was bothering their hero.
SPORTS
September 20, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
He first appears in the movie as he first appeared with the Dodgers, a wallflower pulled reluctantly into the spotlight, a nerd suddenly tapped on the shoulder by the cool kids. The character that is supposed to be Paul DePodesta is a rumpled and bespectacled figure leaning against a wall whispering trade vetoes to a Cleveland Indians colleague. The character that is supposed to be Billy Beane openly wonders who he is, and why everyone thinks he's so smart, and so begins a journey that Dodgers fans will instantly and painfully recognize.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1997
Michael Levin's recent complaint about the movies' lack of heroes ("Flynt Doesn't Deserve Heroic Film Treatment," Counterpunch, Jan. 6) was especially irritating when he made such a sweeping generalization as, "Isn't there anyone else they could make a movie about? Someone out there displaying some courage, something to emulate?" The 100-year history of cinema is filled with movies about heroes (and heroines). "The People vs. Larry Flynt" is simply one movie about one particular individual (like him or not)
SPORTS
January 28, 1985 | SCOTT OSTLER
This was Joe Montana's football season, and Dan Marino's, and Eric Dickerson's and Walter Payton's. But for one shining moment a week ago, it belonged to Wendell Tyler. And for what he did, Wendell gets my vote for MVP--Most Valiant Parader. Here's what happened: The day after the 49ers won the Super Bowl, with Tyler playing a minor supporting role after a superb season, the city of San Francisco held a downtown parade for its heroes. Wendell showed up and rode in the parade.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A parrot whose cries of alarm alerted his owner when a little girl choked on her breakfast has been honored as a hero. Willie, a Quaker parrot, was given the Denver Red Cross chapter's Animal Lifesaver Award last week. In November, Willie's owner, Megan Howard, was baby-sitting a toddler, Hannah. Howard left the room and the little girl started to choke on her breakfast. Willie repeatedly yelled "Mama, baby" and flapped his wings until Howard returned to find Hannah turning blue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Victoria Kim and Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writers
Three years ago, Gregory Lintner walked away with only scrapes and bruises from a Metrolink train crash in Glendale that killed 11 people. One woman, bloodied and badly injured, called the Army veteran a "hero" for staying by her side as they waited for emergency crews to arrive. He was OK, Lintner told everyone afterward. He continued riding the train. Then on Friday, the unthinkable happened. Lintner, 48, was once again caught in a deadly Metrolink accident. This time, he was among the 25 people killed when their commuter train collided head-on with a Union Pacific freight train.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2008
"IRON MAN" looks great ["A Hero Complex," March 9]. Marvel Studios looks like a winner. But Geoff Boucher overlooked the single biggest reason for Marvel's rebirth in Hollywood: the highly rated, 1992-97 TV show, "X-Men: The Animated Series." For 30 years Marvel Comics had had no luck translating its "serious" vision to film or television. Networks and studios didn't get it, or it was dumbed down. Then Fox Kids TV executives Margaret Loesch and Sidney Iwanter pushed through and supervised the first series that respected the creations of Stan Lee, Jack Kirby and their colleagues.
SPORTS
August 19, 2007 | T.J. SIMERS
So I spent much of Saturday putting together a "these people live among you" column, becoming more and more depressed by the minute before going in a completely different direction. I had gone to Las Vegas, asked Kobe Bryant a series of questions about the questions that he had raised about his future with the Lakers and was now reading e-mail from people who were really ticked off because I was bothering their hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2006
SORRY, but in this day of plastic and soulless heroes, Kenneth Turan is not going to take away one of our last movie heroes ["Punch Drunk and Down for the Count," Dec. 20]. I'm sure this film is probably intended to play out to a certain demographic, of which I'm included, but there are lots of us out here who actually place values in front of mere spectacle. "Rocky Balboa" effectively and entertainingly addresses the generation gap between young and old, father and son, old school and new. It's pointless to allow real-world logistics to stand in the way of a chance to revisit a very real hero in the minds of those of us who believe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2006 | Kate Aurthur
THE critically lauded "Battlestar Galactica," Sci Fi Channel's remake of the fluffy 1978 television series, was politically minded from the outset. The 2003 miniseries began with the genocide of billions of people in a Sept. 11-like attack by the Cylons, a mysterious race of robots. The show, now in its third season, has mostly been set in space, as the survivors on the Battlestar fleet have tried to evade the Cylons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2003 | Lee Romney, Seema Mehta and Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writers
Steven L. Rucker, the husband and father from Marin County who died while trying to save burning homes in San Diego County, "helped a lot of people and touched a lot of lives," his sister said Wednesday. "He was a real hero," Starla Lincoln said. "We are very proud of him." Rucker, 38, was one of 11 firefighters from the Novato Fire Protection District in Marin County who drove more than 400 miles overnight Monday to join the battle against the Cedar fire near Julian.
SPORTS
March 17, 2001
The ad for Oscar De La Hoya's next fight--"A Real Hero Returns"--is rather odd. Here's a guy who dumped his girlfriend, demoted his trainer, sued his promoter to break his contract, and blacked out the L.A. area for his next fight. This is a real hero? RICHARD LARABA Lomita
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2006 | Tribune Media Services
Somewhere deep inside many ordinary human beings lies an inner superhero who longs to do good deeds, right wrongs, defeat evil and save the world. But unless one happens to become a soldier or cop or firefighter or nurse or ER doctor -- or is bitten by a radioactive spider or bombarded by gamma rays -- that cape and tights often remain safely tucked away. Comic-book legend Stan Lee wants to get the spandex out of the closet. On Thursday at 9 p.m.
OPINION
December 4, 2005 | Joe R. Hicks, Joe R. Hicks is a social critic, commentator and vice president of Community Advocate Inc. He formerly directed the activities of the Los Angeles Human Relations Commission and Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
LURKING BEHIND the question of "Should Tookie die?" being pondered by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger are the troubling attempts by some of Stanley Tookie Williams' supporters to present the Crips' purported co-founder as a role model for inner-city youth. The effort is molded after the campaign to turn Mumia Abu-Jamal, a convicted cop-killer, into a political prisoner. Abu-Jamal now sits on Pennsylvania's death row with his case grinding its way through various levels of appeals.
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