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OPINION
June 8, 2007
Re "LAUSD, the school bully," Opinion, June 7 Bruce William Smith shows what's wrong with our school system. Teachers who use their own resources and time to help students should be rewarded, not persecuted. The retaliation of the L.A. Unified School District is proof that it's more concerned with control of budget than quality of education. Students deserve better. JOE D'AUGUSTINE Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
There's certainly a profound and valuable documentary to be made about our eldest living senior citizens. Sadly, "Walter: Lessons From the World's Oldest People" isn't it. Filmmaker Hunter Weeks, largely accompanied by producer-fiancée Sarah E. Hall, travels across America, Cuba and Italy to meet a handful of supercentenarians - that is, people 110 years old or more. It's a singular, noble effort for sure. But Weeks and Hall, concurrently going through their own life transitions, hog so much screen time with facile observations, stagy reactions and, yes, food consumption, that their venerable subjects often take a backseat.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1988
President Reagan cannot begin to heal the deep divisions of the Vietnam War until he recognizes and states that the real lesson is this: Young Americans must never again be sent to fight and die unless the American people are convinced that the war is necessary to save a truly democratic nation from the military imposition of a foreign tyranny. Americans in two world wars showed themselves capable of great and supreme sacrifices when this lesson was heeded. This lesson would end the blame implied that some Americans helped "lose" the Vietnam War; this lesson would unite us again, and, most deeply, it would be true to the Jeffersonian principles at the foundation of our great republic.
OPINION
October 5, 2011 | By Kevin A. Sabet
Prohibition — America's notoriously "failed social experiment" to rid the country of alcohol — took center stage this week as PBS broadcast Ken Burns' highly acclaimed series on the subject. And already, it has been seized on by drug legalization advocates, who say it proves that drug prohibition should be abandoned. But a closer look at what resulted from alcohol prohibition and its relevance to today's anti-drug effort reveals a far more nuanced picture than the legalization lobby might like to admit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1989
Although well-intentioned, Los Angeles Board of Education board member Leticia Quesada's column ("L.A. Must Take a Stand on Schools," Op-Ed Page, May 24) is both contradictory and naive. Referring to the teachers' strike, she acknowledges that neither school officials nor the board "has done a good job of informing the community about how schools are funded, how negotiations take place and what role the city can play in shaping school policies." How, then, can she proceed to admonish us for being asleep, not knowing how much money the district has, ignoring the politics of those on both sides of the current issue and failing to be present at negotiations?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1992
In between my son David's jazz dancing lesson and his ice-skating lesson, I took him to what is left of the Heroes and Legends comic book and card store for another lesson. One that no child should ever have to learn. But one with which Jewish children must live. The smell of smoke was still in the air. Charred books and cards were piled up in front of the burned building. We walked along the side of the building, past the wall spray-painted with SS and swastika symbols. David just kept asking "Why?"
OPINION
January 17, 1993
The alleged "bitter lesson" taught to us by your editorial, "All Kinds of Kids Get in Trouble" (Jan. 8), leaves me despondent and puzzled. Who is to blame when affluent kids get into trouble? The notion that crime and gangs can somehow "divert" the attention of an otherwise innocent student is ludicrous and obscures the validity of the real lesson to be learned. The proverbial railroad tracks do not divide, by their propensity to do crime, the rich and the poor. They divide those that have the ability to choose good from evil and those lacking this value.
OPINION
December 29, 2004
Re "Surprise! The Soviets Nearly Won Afghan War," Opinion, Dec. 26: After nine years of brutal warfare in which more than 2.5 million Afghans (mostly civilians) were killed or maimed and 14,453 Soviet troops were killed, Mark Kramer has the audacity to claim that the Soviets "almost" won their war in Afghanistan. Though the Soviet experience may demonstrate that close does indeed count in hand grenades (especially when deployed against civilians), the real lesson is that even the most drastic and damnable practices will not lead to victory over a stubborn insurgency.
SPORTS
March 5, 2005
He's a wonderful writer, but Bill Plaschke missed the biggest lesson from his own column about Adrian Beltre ["Misplaced Priority," Feb. 28]. Losing Beltre wasn't a failure by the Dodgers, it was a decision by the Dodgers. Just read "Moneyball." Los Angeles is the new Oakland: same DePodesta, different tightwad owner. The Dodgers decided Beltre was too pricey, so they dumped him. The real lesson is that the Dodgers now have an oily ownership-management team that will say anything, anything, to buy time while they hope that cheap ("Moneyball")
HEALTH
September 12, 2011 | By Anna B. Reisman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A few years before I started medical school, I called the volunteer office at a New York City hospital. I imagined myself donning scrubs and handing clamps and scalpels to surgeons or organizing jars of pickled body parts for a pathologist. Instead, I was assigned to the least exciting job in the entire volunteer department: helping the patient advocate's office survey elderly patients about their hospital experiences. I sulked down the hall, plotting how to get reassigned as quickly as possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2011 | Rick Rojas
Prosecutor Alondra Carrillo stood before a jury with a harrowing tale of social media gone wrong. It was a case of a jilted eighth-grade boy, devastated when his former best friend not only turned down his invitation to a dance, but also laughed at him. He was humiliated, and he told her she would pay for spurning him. And after the boy took his anger to Facebook, the prosecutor told jurors, the girl paid dearly. It was a serious and relevant case, even if the prosecutor could hardly see over the lectern in the courtroom and the charges were fake.
OPINION
July 1, 2011 | Doyle McManus
In 2008, as financial crisis threatened the U.S. banking system, President George W. Bush asked Congress to approve an emergency bailout. Leaders of both parties blessed the idea; both presidential candidates — Barack Obama and John McCain — endorsed it. But conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats rebelled, the House defeated the bill — and the stock market plummeted in real time during the roll call. It took the prospect of economic meltdown to get the House to reverse itself and approve Bush's Troubled Asset Relief Program.
OPINION
July 23, 2010 | By Kaitlin Manry
I became an English tutor by accident. A few months out of college and feeling lonely and bored in a new town 3,000 miles from my family and friends, I volunteered to teach illiterate adults to read. It was something to do, somewhere to go other than my moldy attic apartment after work in a windowless office in Aberdeen, Wash., a foggy mill town of 16,000 people best known as the hometown Kurt Cobain slammed in his songs. To my dismay, the volunteer coordinator at Grays Harbor Community College declined my offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Walt Disney took a small step away from animation in the 1940s with the live-action/animated features "Song of the South" and "So Dear to My Heart," and in 1950 he made his first foray into pure live action, "Treasure Island," in England. The impetus was financial -- British law required American film companies to use a percentage of the money they made showing films and shorts in England to produce movies there. So Disney financed 80% to 90% of "Treasure Island" with those funds.
OPINION
June 8, 2007
Re "LAUSD, the school bully," Opinion, June 7 Bruce William Smith shows what's wrong with our school system. Teachers who use their own resources and time to help students should be rewarded, not persecuted. The retaliation of the L.A. Unified School District is proof that it's more concerned with control of budget than quality of education. Students deserve better. JOE D'AUGUSTINE Los Angeles
SPORTS
May 26, 2001
It bothers me that some of the same voices who criticize athletes for going pro straight out of high school or for not finishing their degrees are nailing Vince Carter for attending his graduation ceremony. At best, they're sending a mixed message. At worst, they're sending a message that states that it's wrong for an individual to celebrate a personal victory at the possible expense of company profits. Sure, we've seen that teamwork over individual effort is a successful formula. (I'm glad the Lakers figured this out.)
OPINION
October 5, 2011 | By Kevin A. Sabet
Prohibition — America's notoriously "failed social experiment" to rid the country of alcohol — took center stage this week as PBS broadcast Ken Burns' highly acclaimed series on the subject. And already, it has been seized on by drug legalization advocates, who say it proves that drug prohibition should be abandoned. But a closer look at what resulted from alcohol prohibition and its relevance to today's anti-drug effort reveals a far more nuanced picture than the legalization lobby might like to admit.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2007 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
"People are forgetting how to listen," says Maria Callas, addressing a theater full of people who have come to see her under the pretense of witnessing a Juilliard master class in singing. "If you can't hear me, it's your fault. You're not concentrating." We laugh, but we also detect the ache beneath the imperious mien. Before this session is over, that ache has become an open wound.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2006 | Cyndia Zwahlen, Special to The Times
Entrepreneur Greg Samson, 28, has the kind of access to top venture capitalists, veteran entrepreneurs and business professionals that would be the envy of most start-ups. His business plan got the thumbs-up -- and a $250,000 investment -- from a leading venture capital firm, Draper Fisher Jurvetson of Menlo Park, Calif. Samson has been coached by members of Tech Coast Angels, a well-known Southern California investor group.
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