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Real Life Violence

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NEWS
February 23, 1986
As a member of the Hollywood community, I do feel violence on television has been providing the incentive for glamorizing real-life violence. Television programs showing people how to get along are on the wane as networks increasingly favor "car chases, murder and mayhem." Television has received a lot of credit for the good it has brought to its viewers. It also must be held responsible for the bad. Michael Levine, Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1999
Bravo to Sean Mitchell for his commentary on Hollywood on-screen violence ("Hollywood: Ground Zero," May 1).. Violence and sex sells. Movie people make a lot of money. They don't want to bite the hand that feeds them. There are many factors that affect violent behavior. But if movies that promote gratuitous violence are even a fraction of the cause of real-life violence, then movie people should examine what they promote and make money from. I wondered what Leonardo DiCaprio thought of his violence-inspiring performance in "The Basketball Diaries"?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1993
Re "The Buzz in Show Biz--Don't Blame Us for Real-Life Violence" (Oct. 25): The perpetual battle of blaming others for the violence in our lives and absolving ourselves continues. The industry says, turn off the tube; the parents say they can't watch their children 24 hours a day, therefore the industry must lessen the violence. In reality, both the industry and the parents are responsible and must both take blame and change themselves. There's another group that's not doing its duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1999 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who pulled the trigger? The guessing game--or finger pointing--begins, predictably, after each tragedy. Equally predictable are the targets of blame--the media, the NRA, poor parenting, the devil. For days or weeks it's front-page news. Indignation blossoms and withers into cant. Then it's gone. Some new outrage muscles in. The caravan moves on. But what about this time? Because of the body count, accretion, the images, or something, this time feels different. The Littleton, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1999
Bravo to Sean Mitchell for his commentary on Hollywood on-screen violence ("Hollywood: Ground Zero," May 1).. Violence and sex sells. Movie people make a lot of money. They don't want to bite the hand that feeds them. There are many factors that affect violent behavior. But if movies that promote gratuitous violence are even a fraction of the cause of real-life violence, then movie people should examine what they promote and make money from. I wondered what Leonardo DiCaprio thought of his violence-inspiring performance in "The Basketball Diaries"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1997
There is a lot of talk about violence in our society, but many people aren't sure what they can do about it. This uncertainty places one of the most vulnerable segments of our population in jeopardy: our children. Consider the fact that every 17 minutes a child in our country is starved, beaten, shot or killed in some violent way. If they are not victims, chances are children have witnessed some form of real-life violence. The American Academy of Pediatrics has designated violence prevention as an important theme for the national Child Health Month this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1993 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children's advocates on Tuesday applauded MTV's decision to eliminate the 7 p.m. airing of "Beavis and Butt-head" but said that the cable network's decision did not go far enough to answer criticisms of the controversial cartoon show. "I applaud MTV for eliminating the earlier showing, but I have a very jaundiced view of why they're doing it," said Dr. Carole Lieberman, a Los Angeles psychiatrist who has been active in the movement to curb violence on television. "I think the main reason why they're doing this is fear of legal liability rather than a real sense of responsibility to America's children."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Common sense dictates that people shouldn't have to be told that fire burns and lying in the middle of a busy street is dangerous--if not downright stupid. But they will let anybody with seven bucks into the movies. Such were the sentiments--some bitter, some biting--from the regulars at Residuals, a Studio City bar haunted by the worker bees of the entertainment industry. Violence in the media was all the buzz Friday. It had been a week in which Atty. Gen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1999 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who pulled the trigger? The guessing game--or finger pointing--begins, predictably, after each tragedy. Equally predictable are the targets of blame--the media, the NRA, poor parenting, the devil. For days or weeks it's front-page news. Indignation blossoms and withers into cant. Then it's gone. Some new outrage muscles in. The caravan moves on. But what about this time? Because of the body count, accretion, the images, or something, this time feels different. The Littleton, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It would be nice if television sets were equipped with electronic chips that automatically rejected everything and everyone found to be annoying: most infomercials, certain newscasts, Dick Vitale, Rush Limbaugh, Richard Simmons, Mr. Blackwell, Tom and Roseanne getting high on themselves. Pick your peeve. But much of the public appears interested only in vetoing violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1997
There is a lot of talk about violence in our society, but many people aren't sure what they can do about it. This uncertainty places one of the most vulnerable segments of our population in jeopardy: our children. Consider the fact that every 17 minutes a child in our country is starved, beaten, shot or killed in some violent way. If they are not victims, chances are children have witnessed some form of real-life violence. The American Academy of Pediatrics has designated violence prevention as an important theme for the national Child Health Month this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It would be nice if television sets were equipped with electronic chips that automatically rejected everything and everyone found to be annoying: most infomercials, certain newscasts, Dick Vitale, Rush Limbaugh, Richard Simmons, Mr. Blackwell, Tom and Roseanne getting high on themselves. Pick your peeve. But much of the public appears interested only in vetoing violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1993
Re "The Buzz in Show Biz--Don't Blame Us for Real-Life Violence" (Oct. 25): The perpetual battle of blaming others for the violence in our lives and absolving ourselves continues. The industry says, turn off the tube; the parents say they can't watch their children 24 hours a day, therefore the industry must lessen the violence. In reality, both the industry and the parents are responsible and must both take blame and change themselves. There's another group that's not doing its duty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Common sense dictates that people shouldn't have to be told that fire burns and lying in the middle of a busy street is dangerous--if not downright stupid. But they will let anybody with seven bucks into the movies. Such were the sentiments--some bitter, some biting--from the regulars at Residuals, a Studio City bar haunted by the worker bees of the entertainment industry. Violence in the media was all the buzz Friday. It had been a week in which Atty. Gen.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1993 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children's advocates on Tuesday applauded MTV's decision to eliminate the 7 p.m. airing of "Beavis and Butt-head" but said that the cable network's decision did not go far enough to answer criticisms of the controversial cartoon show. "I applaud MTV for eliminating the earlier showing, but I have a very jaundiced view of why they're doing it," said Dr. Carole Lieberman, a Los Angeles psychiatrist who has been active in the movement to curb violence on television. "I think the main reason why they're doing this is fear of legal liability rather than a real sense of responsibility to America's children."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with guns that shoot paint and BBs, a few dozen teen-agers regularly play war games in the darkened canyons near the U.S.-Mexico border. The participants belong to groups with names such as Metal Militia or Sudden Death and regularly do battle starting about 9 Saturday nights. "I do it to prepare for my future in the military," said Jason MacAllister, a 17-year-old Imperial Beach resident. "And, yeah, it's fun, it's really fun."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with guns that shoot paint and BBs, a few dozen teen-agers regularly play war games in the darkened canyons near the U.S.-Mexico border. The participants belong to groups with names such as Metal Militia or Sudden Death and regularly do battle starting about 9 Saturday nights. "I do it to prepare for my future in the military," said Jason MacAllister, a 17-year-old Imperial Beach resident. "And, yeah, it's fun, it's really fun."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Scott Collins
To any viewer who thinks "Sons of Anarchy" is too violent, consider the bright side: At least the castration scene got … um … deleted. Kurt Sutter, creator of the drama about a California motorcycle gang, presented the idea of showing a character getting the unkindest cut early in the run of the show, now FX's highest-rated. But he backed off after the network's chief objected. "I have no filters," Sutter said with a laugh. "I just assume everyone feels the way I do about things.
NEWS
February 23, 1986
As a member of the Hollywood community, I do feel violence on television has been providing the incentive for glamorizing real-life violence. Television programs showing people how to get along are on the wane as networks increasingly favor "car chases, murder and mayhem." Television has received a lot of credit for the good it has brought to its viewers. It also must be held responsible for the bad. Michael Levine, Los Angeles
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