Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReal Love
IN THE NEWS

Real Love

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1996
The Fab Four are back on top of the charts again. The Beatles' "Anthology 2," the second two-disc set in the three-part archival series that debuted with Vol. 1 last November, is the 17th album from the group to reach No. 1 on the U.S. chart. Not surprisingly, it also leads The Times' Southern California album chart. And the album's release sparked sales of "Real Love," the single from the album. TOP 10 ALBUMS *--* Title, Artist (Nat'l Rank) Last Week 1 Anthology 2, Beatles (1) ...
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The moral of "Blue Is the Warmest Color" is simple: Sex without love is nothing; life without love is even less. French filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche's story of sexual awakening and real love stretches over 10 years. Loosely based on Julie Maroh's superbly illustrated graphic novel and adapted for the screen by Kechiche and Ghalya Lacroix, it traces the life cycle of a relationship beginning to end. The telling is beautiful and explicit. The truth of its emotionally raw, romantic drama is eternal and universal.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
My friends who aren't parents--or those trendy late-starters who are only now at the diaper-and-cuddle stage--look at me funny when they hear what I call my hectic morning routine. "Don't call between 6 and 7:30 in the morning," I tell them. "I'll be busy chasing the children out of the house." It does sound kind of heartless, I suppose. But chasing children is a crucial part of mommying. Kids can make it into adulthood without apple pie--if it's absolutely necessary, you can always heat up one of those Mrs. What's-Her-Name frozen jobs to feed them.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Lauren Conrad has kept a low TV profile since she ended her reality TV days of MTV's "Laguna Beach" and its spinoff "The Hills. " And she's not itching to get back in that spotlight. "I only ever got to tell half my story," Conrad told Marie Claire, which she covers in the July 2013 issue. "People are very quick to judge these days, especially behind the anonymity of a screen name. It's very easy to say, 'I hate her, I hate what she wore, she seems mean.' But you're only seeing a small fraction of her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
The real love defined in the video for the second Beatles "reunion" song isn't romantic love (as in "And I Love Her") nor sociopolitical idealism (as in "All You Need Is Love"). This real love is friendship--the closeness between John, Paul, George and Ringo that once made everything about the Beatles, from the music to the horseplay, so enchanting.
BOOKS
December 27, 1992 | Robert Dawidoff, Dawidoff is most recently the author of "The Genteel Tradition and the Sacred Rage: High Culture v. Democracy" (University of North Carolina Press) and with Michael Nava of the forthcoming "Created Equal: Why Americans Should Care About Gay Rights."
The House of Real Love" tells the story of an uncommonly observant, if selectively aware woman whose fate it has been to avoid "real love," not to mention real life. She has maintained, however, the appearance of both. She and her lover of 20 years, an oncologist, dwell in a cave designed by a visionary architect in what feels like Pasadena; they are leading an exemplary contemporary lesbian lifestyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1997 | JOHN ROGERS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The first thing Casey Piotrowski wants to make clear is that he's not some crackpot with nothing better to do. It just happens that he likes the Beatles--a lot. And that is why this sometime actor, voice-over artist and former disc jockey has put his life on hold for most of the past year to single-mindedly pursue one goal: getting the Beatles a Grammy for their new song, "Real Love." Not just any Grammy, either, but the one for record of the year.
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Roper is one of the spookiest (and very best) writers in America. His novels vary and change and curl around each other, and just watching this sensuous movement is a pleasure. His last novel, "Mexico Days," created a perfect, surreal world full of violence and beauty and lust. This new one, "The Trespassers," ingenuously passes itself off as a love story cast in the mold of "Lady Chatterly's Lover," but it is far more complex than that.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | LEONARD REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contentious English gamecock is giving Ronna Jurow a problem. Actually, it would like to take her eyes out, which it almost did once. "Oh, come here now," coos Jurow, her hands and forearms covered in protective leather, reeling in the leashed dervish as it splays and flaps and screeches and kicks up dust clouds from its scratching spinning feet. "There." She snatches him up from the ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2007 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
FOR a month now, young Hollywood has been planning a retirement party. The guest list spans the pop culture landscape -- studio executives, novelists, Academy Award winners, sitcom writers, musicians. One proposal has Martin Scorsese jumping out of a cake. The honoree will take the bus unless he can hitch a ride with someone. A lively, bespectacled bachelor who lives alone in a rent-controlled apartment, he can't drive.
HOME & GARDEN
April 21, 2012 | Michelle Maltais
Early in the summer of 2009, I was finally done. For real, this time. He didn't know it yet, but I did. And that was enough. Years ago, I had promised myself that I would start having children no later than age 38. I was 36 that summer. It just wasn't going to happen with Mike. In truth, Mike and I had been simulating a relationship for months. I fooled myself into thinking we would transition into something greater. He fooled himself into thinking I had given up that notion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2010 | By Rachel Abramowitz >>>
It's a little disconcerting to hear Anne Hathaway talk dirty. Huddled in an office cubicle on the set of the new romantic comedy, "Valentine's Day," Hathaway, she of the pearly white skin, the doe-like eyes, the fantasy pedigree in the "Princess Diaries" movies, is purring lasciviously and furtively into the phone, lines like "I'm going to show you the wildest ride," and "I don't mind the fetishists." Puckishly presiding over the tweaking of her wholesome image is "Valentine's Day" director Garry Marshall, who a decade ago put the tiara on Hathaway's head by casting her in the first "Princess" film.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
"You've caught me with my pants on," Hugh Hefner said with a sad smirk. There are days (or entire decades) when Hefner greets the midday sun in silk pajamas and a robe, but on this particular December afternoon, well, the playboy just wasn't in the mood.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Lewis is a Times staff writer.
How good was Lucinda Williams' performance Friday night at the Wiltern? Crazy good. And sane good, sexy good, playful good, anguished good, angry good, cathartic good, brawny good, rockin' good, bluesy good -- head, heart and soul good. Above all, the Louisiana-born singer-songwriter revels in the music of the soul, and judging from the remarkably rich litany of songs she's written over the last three decades, she's got one of the saddest-sweetest ones ever passed out.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2007 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
If St. Theresa is to be believed, more tears are shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones. Which puts HBO's new dramatic series "Tell Me You Love Me" smack in the Answered Prayers category. I am, I admit, one of those wearisome people who, after watching some perfectly nice romantic drama, will heave an irritated sigh and whine: "Why don't they ever do a show about what marriage is really like?" Now, thanks to "Tell Me You Love Me," I know. Because it's boring, that's why. To tears.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2007 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
FOR a month now, young Hollywood has been planning a retirement party. The guest list spans the pop culture landscape -- studio executives, novelists, Academy Award winners, sitcom writers, musicians. One proposal has Martin Scorsese jumping out of a cake. The honoree will take the bus unless he can hitch a ride with someone. A lively, bespectacled bachelor who lives alone in a rent-controlled apartment, he can't drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Steve Martin movie "L.A. Story" has a completely original spirit. It's wiggy yet deeply, helplessly romantic. It's a movie about infatuation--with women, with Los Angeles, with comedy. Mick Jackson, the Britisher who directed from Martin's script, offers up a whirligig of familiar L.A. locales, but they're transformed by the filmmakers' ardor. The imagery has a spin to it, as if we too were being enswooned by it all. Martin's Harris K.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Lauren Conrad has kept a low TV profile since she ended her reality TV days of MTV's "Laguna Beach" and its spinoff "The Hills. " And she's not itching to get back in that spotlight. "I only ever got to tell half my story," Conrad told Marie Claire, which she covers in the July 2013 issue. "People are very quick to judge these days, especially behind the anonymity of a screen name. It's very easy to say, 'I hate her, I hate what she wore, she seems mean.' But you're only seeing a small fraction of her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2007 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
THE male mind is exposed, for better and often worse, in "Don't Make Me Stop Now" by Michael Parker. In this collection of stories, the author delves into the vicissitudes of love, with its humorous and heartbreaking consequences. Parker's characters struggle with alcohol, desire, obsession and loss -- but always they struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2006 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
FOR those of you who've been following along, here's a quick brush-up on last season's cliffhangers. Missed a swath of a series? There's still time for a DVD binge. Or consider this the total-immersion course and wade right in. * Lost Locke, why didn't you listen to Mr. Eko and press the button? Jack, Kate, Sawyer: Don't hate the player -- hate the game. Michael had no choice but to serve you all up to the Others in exchange for his son, Walt.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|