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NEWS
February 27, 2003
In his article "Love in La La Land" ( Feb. 13), James Verini states, "Los Angeles, the city of illusion, a Barnum and Bailey town, yes, but -- if you believe in it -- a city of romance too." Really? Well, I happen to have a bridge for sale in Brooklyn for this guy. I have lived in Los Angeles all of my adult life and fit into Mr. Verini's classification of "pro." I'm a 10-year screenwriting veteran. In spite of the fact that I am a highly desirable catch for any man in Los Angeles, this successful woman's experience is that the Guidos of Los Angeles never have the epiphany Mastroianni has in the film "8 1/2."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
Barneys New York appears to be doubling down on the dapper dude by rolling out a fall 2013 "Man Up" advertising campaign that celebrates the retailer's roots in menswear as well as recent renovations of the menswear real estate at the company's Madison Avenue flagship. Among the things well-dressed guys (and those who shop for them) can look forward to? A "Man Up" mailer shot by David Slijper with Barneys New York creative director Dennis Freedman, style tips, a freshly renovated men's first floor and a soon-to-be-finished men's sixth floor at the Madison Avenue store, and "Manning Up 101," a list of 15 style rules to live by -- since everyone knows guys don't like to ask for directions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1995
The April 10 Community Essay "Homophobes Restrict All Males, Straight and Gay" requires a response. The essay relates a scene involving two husky, 20-something men sitting in a Santa Monica movie theater. They sat maintaining an empty seat between them. (Author Joseph) Hanania suggests that this was to make clear to potential onlookers that they were not gay. This assumption on Hanania's part regarding their motivation seems a huge jump. If I were to attend a movie with a male friend it is highly likely that there would be an empty seat between us. Why?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
After the news broke that actor James Gandolfini had died, media outlets everywhere scrambled to put him, and his beloved character Tony Soprano, into cultural context. But if you wanted to understand the importance of the man and the show, all you had to do was listen to sports radio. Even as the NBA Finals moved toward a thrilling and decisive Game 7, ESPN sportscasters were talking about nothing but Gandolfini's death, reminiscing about "The Sopranos" with the tones of sorrowful obsession usually reserved for the passing of an iconic coach or star athlete.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | KEVIN ALLMAN
The Scene: "Listening Party," Thursday night at the China Club. On the turntable was the new album "Real Men . . . Wear Black" by the three-man funk group Cameo, and several hundred people, including 66.6% of the band, showed up to lend an ear. The Entertainment: For those who have never been to one, a listening party for a rock album isn't quite like an evening at the symphony, with guests listening quietly and applauding between movements.
OPINION
June 7, 2004
Los Angeles County's newly minted Domestic Violence Dudes, as they call themselves, closed their graduation ceremony May 27 at the Lynwood jail with a rendition of "Lean on Me" so raucous and emotional that Bill Withers' version sounds reedy and flat in comparison. But the 33 men who completed the innovative Bridges to Recovery program -- convicted batterers all -- didn't land behind bars because they were touchy-feely guys.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2009 | Jon Caramanica
"He's Just Not That Into You," in movie theaters this weekend, plays in moments like an instructional film, with characters speaking in boxy, formulaic sentences meant to assure or warn women of how they can truly read the men in their lives. It carries itself like a public service announcement: smug and certain and pedantic. But in this case, even more important than the words is who's saying them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1988
The latest rage in the automotive world is the high-performance "muscle" car--with advertising to match that oozes power, thrust and dominance. The best local example comes from Hoehn Motors in Carlsbad, which advertises its Porsches on radio thusly: "If speed limits were not a consideration, the Porsche 944 Turbo could go from Point Loma to Carlsbad in 9.8 minutes. The 944S could go from Mission Valley to Carlsbad in 8.3 minutes.
NEWS
April 22, 2002 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first thing Ian Tresman wanted to know when he decided to have a vasectomy was what the operation was like for a regular guy who'd been through it. To the distress of the 41-year-old Web page designer, all the information he found about vasectomies on the Web, in bookstores and in libraries read like medical journal entries. "It was a quite a big decision to even consider a vasectomy," said Tresman, who lives outside London with his wife and his two daughters from a previous marriage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992 | Tony Perry
Like a bull in a room of Dresden worth $200 per-place setting, Evan Keliher of Rancho Bernardo charges into a world that is hip deep in political correctness and gender blending. First there was his paperback, "For Men Only (How to Survive Marriage)." It suggested--only slightly tongue in cheek--that men take control (both of the marriage and the television set) and not suffer any guff. The book sold briskly and Keliher, 60, a retired high school teacher from Detroit, visited the talk shows.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Harrumph. Every year I swear I will ignore the Super Bowl mania, and most years I succeed. But every once in a while it just overwhelms me. Look, I like a good football game as much as the next guy. Well, that's not really true, but let's just say I've been there and I understand that. What I can't understand is the continued effort to make Super Bowl Sunday some kind of national holiday, complete with food. It's like Thanksgiving, but with dips and chips. And that's wrong on so many levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2009
Thank you for giving me renewed hope for the intelligence of the future ["Separating the Boys From the Real Men," by Jon Caramanica, Feb. 8]. When my 18-year-old daughter found herself companionless, she asked me to go to the movies with her. Reveling in the invitation, I went blindly into the "He's Just Not That Into You" movie. I feel as if Caramanica sat next to me in the theater and overheard my daughter and my ongoing dialogue. I was first angry, then mortified, then embarrassed for my gender, then irate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2009 | Jon Caramanica
"He's Just Not That Into You," in movie theaters this weekend, plays in moments like an instructional film, with characters speaking in boxy, formulaic sentences meant to assure or warn women of how they can truly read the men in their lives. It carries itself like a public service announcement: smug and certain and pedantic. But in this case, even more important than the words is who's saying them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2007 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Reality bites. That's the way the Klaxons see it anyway, and the rising English band has built its music and its considerable mystique on avoiding anything to do with the material or the mundane. "We just wanted to sing about fantasy and nowhere," said Jamie Reynolds, the Klaxons' hulking bassist and chief theoretician. "The only thing that ties everything together on our record is that every single song is about nowhere and there's no physical representation of anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2007 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
"Carpoolers" opens funny -- four guys on their way to work, singing along with Air Supply -- but it's downhill from there, and the slide, though quick and permanent, isn't even dramatic enough to be interesting. A low-rent "Big Shots," "Carpoolers" doesn't have enough edge to be offensive. It just isn't funny. Which is a problem, you know, for a comedy. It's too bad, since the sum of its parts is much better than its whole.
SPORTS
July 13, 2007 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
David Beckham has arrived to try his hand at our true national sport -- being a celebrity. Meanwhile, with all the setbacks we've had in basketball and baseball in recent years, we're looking for a game where we can still be big, bruising Americans. Enter good old American football, long a laggard on the international sporting scene. The U.S. is making its first appearance in the World Championship of American Football, an event being held for only the third time.
OPINION
April 26, 2002 | NORAH VINCENT, Norah Vincent is a senior fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a think tank set up after Sept. 11 to study terrorism.
Nobody talks about honor anymore, certainly not male honor, so this is going to sound very old-fashioned. And nobody, except the hippest, most artfully abstruse academics, thinks of wars in terms of gender paradigms. But the war on terror is just such a war. It's a war about cultural masculinity, ours versus theirs. Western masculinity is in remarkably good shape at present.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | MARY BRASIER, The Guardian
Real men used to refuse quiche. Today, when it is served up by wives in business suits who have rushed home from the office, briefcase in one hand, children and a store-prepared meal in the other, quiche is OK. Just don't ask them to cook it. Thirty years of women's liberation may have brought equality in the workplace, even treatment by the world outside and the unquestionable right of a woman to buy a man lunch, but they have failed miserably to dent traditional male prejudices in the home.
NEWS
May 17, 2007
Oh, my God! I thought it was just me, it's good to know there are others out there like me ["Dazed by the Dating Game," May 10]. It is extremely hard to get a guy to even commit to a date these days, they either want you to come over to their house for a drink (wink, wink) or come over to your house for a drink and a massage (wink, wink). Like Teresa Strasser, I might be able to handle life in the '50s, ugh, with a few Valiums. But, isn't it sad there are no more real men around?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
REAL men eat yogurt parfaits. That might be the conclusion after sitting down to breakfast with writing partners Adam McKay and Will Ferrell, two 6-foot-plus white-bread guys in khaki shorts, who also happen to be the director and star, respectively, of the upcoming "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby," a cheerily demented look inside the world of NASCAR racing, in which the women are hot, the men dumb, and the racing cool.
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