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NEWS
July 25, 1993 | DIANNE KLEIN, Klein's column appears Sunday
Remember how, way back when during the presidential election campaign, Hillary Rodham Clinton's supposedly radical views on children's rights were an issue? Good and true Americans were said to be shocked--shocked, I tell you. If I remember the story correctly, the stink had something to do with her legal writings. Seems that all you had to do was read between the lines to figure out that Ms.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey
A delightful summer quirk can be found in the new comic drama "Frances Ha. " Shot in black and white and filled with nuance, the film is directed with great affection by Noah Baumbach, who wrote it with his star - actress Greta Gerwig. Frances is a few years past college and still trying to make her way in New York. She's already struggling to afford the apartment in trendy Brooklyn when her best friend and roommate Sophie (Mickey Sumner) announces she's moving out. While Frances' fortunes take a nose-dive, Gerwig makes it all rather charming.
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NEWS
December 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Two newborn girls were mistakenly switched at a clinic in southwestern Germany and went home with the wrong parents, and doctors are trying to correct the mistake, authorities said Friday. The mix-up, which occurred at the St. Elisabeth clinic in Saarlouis this summer, only recently came to light after one of the fathers took a paternity test, area Councilwoman Monika Bachmann said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A delightful summer quirk can be found in the new comic drama “Frances Ha.” Shot in black and white and filled with nuance, the film is directed with great affection by Noah Baumbach ("The Squid and the Whale"), who wrote it with his star -- actress Greta Gerwig. Frances is a few years past college and still trying to make her way in New York. She's already struggling to afford the apartment in trendy Brooklyn. Then her best friend and roommate Sophie (Mickey Sumner) starts thinking about moving in with her wealthy boyfriend Patch (Patrick Heusinger)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001
Re "Moonbeams and Hope," Commentary, Nov. 28: John Balzar writes poetically about adoption. Thirty-two years ago my husband and I were blessed with adopting a 3-week-old son and three years later a 6-week-old daughter. I memorized this short verse in 1969 when my son joined our family: "Not blood of my blood / Nor bone of my bone / But still miraculously my own / Never forget for a single minute / You weren't born under my heart but in it." However, I bristle at National Adoption Month, a token recognition that spotlights an underclass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1989
Our readers wrote letters throughout 1989 expressing their viewpoints on a variety of issues. Here are condensed versions of some of those letters. We appreciate their taking the time to share their viewpoints and look forward to hearing from more of them in 1990. I am livid every time a newspaper runs an article regarding the meeting of adopted child/birth parent. The reunion always reunites the child with the "real" parent, when in fact the child has met the "birth" parent. Please get it through your heads, we, the adoptive parents, are the real parents!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989
I am livid every time the Los Angeles Times (or any other paper, for that matter) runs an article regarding the meeting of adopted child/birth parent ("A Mother Gets a Day She Can Call the Best," May 15). The reunion always reunites the child with the "real" parent, when in fact the child has met the birth parent. Please, get it through your heads, we, the adoptive parents, are the real parents! We have gone through the grief process and mourning associated with infertility.
NEWS
December 4, 2003
I found Susan King's story about "My Flesh and Blood" interesting ("A Year in the Life," Nov. 27). As an adoptee who was separated from my family for more than 34 years, I am always interested in how adoption is portrayed in the media. I am glad that you so honestly described the children Tom is taking care of as being adopted, the caption for the photo referring to a girl as one of "Susan Tom's adopted children." I also appreciate your description of Tom as someone who just "couldn't stop adopting children."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2008
YOUR review of NBC's new reality series, "The Baby Borrowers," makes light of the perceived entertainment value that the babies and toddlers who are unwittingly thrust into the show provide to the viewing audience ["When Reality Bites -- and Cries and Spits Up," by Mary McNamara, June 25]. While the review acknowledges that babies cry a lot, especially when separated from their real parents, it overlooks the potential damage this show could have on these young children who are used as pawns.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey
A delightful summer quirk can be found in the new comic drama "Frances Ha. " Shot in black and white and filled with nuance, the film is directed with great affection by Noah Baumbach, who wrote it with his star - actress Greta Gerwig. Frances is a few years past college and still trying to make her way in New York. She's already struggling to afford the apartment in trendy Brooklyn when her best friend and roommate Sophie (Mickey Sumner) announces she's moving out. While Frances' fortunes take a nose-dive, Gerwig makes it all rather charming.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
In FILMMAKER Azazel Jacobs' new movie, "Momma's Man," the director reveals an entire family of his own idiosyncrasies -- as well as his own idiosyncratic family. Among his quirks are a deep connection to the past, so much so that he says he remembers turning 5 and instantly missing being a 4-year-old. Growing up in a cluttered home, he's just as attached to material things and, without a doubt, to the parents who raised him there. That's why he cast them as the parents in "Momma's Man," a Sundance favorite opening Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2008
YOUR review of NBC's new reality series, "The Baby Borrowers," makes light of the perceived entertainment value that the babies and toddlers who are unwittingly thrust into the show provide to the viewing audience ["When Reality Bites -- and Cries and Spits Up," by Mary McNamara, June 25]. While the review acknowledges that babies cry a lot, especially when separated from their real parents, it overlooks the potential damage this show could have on these young children who are used as pawns.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2008 | Mary McNamara, Times Television Critic
For reasons probably best explored in a therapist's office, there's nothing quite so satisfying as watching young children misbehave on television. Put a few lively kids and a bowl of spaghetti and meatballs in a room together and who among us can watch without a horrified chuckle? Especially when their parents are ineffectually present, shouting idle threats or just rocking in a corner, emitting the occasional whimper.
NEWS
December 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Two newborn girls were mistakenly switched at a clinic in southwestern Germany and went home with the wrong parents, and doctors are trying to correct the mistake, authorities said Friday. The mix-up, which occurred at the St. Elisabeth clinic in Saarlouis this summer, only recently came to light after one of the fathers took a paternity test, area Councilwoman Monika Bachmann said.
NEWS
December 4, 2003
I found Susan King's story about "My Flesh and Blood" interesting ("A Year in the Life," Nov. 27). As an adoptee who was separated from my family for more than 34 years, I am always interested in how adoption is portrayed in the media. I am glad that you so honestly described the children Tom is taking care of as being adopted, the caption for the photo referring to a girl as one of "Susan Tom's adopted children." I also appreciate your description of Tom as someone who just "couldn't stop adopting children."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001
Re "Moonbeams and Hope," Commentary, Nov. 28: John Balzar writes poetically about adoption. Thirty-two years ago my husband and I were blessed with adopting a 3-week-old son and three years later a 6-week-old daughter. I memorized this short verse in 1969 when my son joined our family: "Not blood of my blood / Nor bone of my bone / But still miraculously my own / Never forget for a single minute / You weren't born under my heart but in it." However, I bristle at National Adoption Month, a token recognition that spotlights an underclass.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2008 | Mary McNamara, Times Television Critic
For reasons probably best explored in a therapist's office, there's nothing quite so satisfying as watching young children misbehave on television. Put a few lively kids and a bowl of spaghetti and meatballs in a room together and who among us can watch without a horrified chuckle? Especially when their parents are ineffectually present, shouting idle threats or just rocking in a corner, emitting the occasional whimper.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | Responses gathered by Sara Schibanoff (Dana Hills), Jeanine Cardullo (La Quinta), Trisha Ginsburg (Los Alamitos), Candace Purvis (Mater Dei), Michael Chen (Valencia)
How many times have you pleaded with your parents using something similar to: "Laura's parents are going to let her. . . . " or 'Jim's parents say they don't care. . . . "? And how many times have you wished for parents who were more understanding, more liberal and more with it ? Hot Topics wonders, "If you could trade in your parents for one day, who would you want as replacements?" "Julia Child for my mom and Donald Trump for my dad.
NEWS
October 13, 1999
I applaud the reunion of Ken Herman with his natural parents ("Now They Know," Oct. 10). Most adoptees do want to find their roots. I am reminded of an article I read recently in which male peacocks, separated before they're hatched, find their siblings when they become adult birds. If peacocks have such strong genetic tendencies, imagine how much influence genetics has on humans. As an adoptee, however, I would like to say that not all of us feel such compulsion to protect the people who raised us that we deny our real mother and father.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | ED STODDARD, REUTERS
They are an improbable couple as they amble side-by-side down a dusty lane. Mother and adopted son are both four-legged herbivores, but their similarities end there. Abandoned by his biological mother in the wild, Jabulani, a 2-year-old elephant, has found a most unlikely maternal figure in Skaap, a female sheep. "Skaap is very good with young wild animals," said Lente Roode, the owner and director of the Hoedspruit Breeding and Research Center for Endangered Species.
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