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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
For the new fact-based war movie "Lone Survivor," which details a Navy SEAL mission gone horribly awry in  the mountains of Afghanistan, leading man Mark Wahlberg had one very important resource to draw from: Marcus Luttrell, the soldier whose memoir of the same name inspired the film, and who was present for much of the cast's training and rehearsal. Luttrell's presence also impressed on Wahlberg that he had big shoes to fill.  At a recent installment of the Envelope Screening Series , Wahlberg and fellow cast member Emile Hirsch, who plays the fallen Navy SEAL Danny Dietz, discussed what it was like portraying real people, men they quickly came to see as heroes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | Patt Morrison
George Steffes was a boy standing on Wilshire Boulevard when Dwight D. Eisenhower rolled by in a motorcade, and he was mightily impressed. But that's not what got him into politics. He went to 5 o'clock Mass one day in 1966 and ran into an acquaintance who was working on Ronald Reagan's gubernatorial campaign. Steffes volunteered. He went to Sacramento as Reagan's legislative aide and has been there ever since. He helped to found the first multi-person lobbying firm in Sacramento, Capitol Partners, where he's now “senior advisor,” no longer running the firm day to day. Almost 50 years in Sacramento have given him a long view of its roller-coaster politicking, including low points like the recent indictment of state Sen. Leland Yee. The ride has left him a bit queasy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1993
Society must really be at a standstill when the Calendar Letters page (Aug. 8) is crowded out by no less than a record company CEO, a TV host-producer, a nationally known nightclub owner, a university professor and an entire artists agency. Too much perspective? And are they hiring? GEORGE FRYER Ordinary Guy Corona del Mar
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the New Yorker this week, James Wood has a fascinating essay on the narrative implications of death. Inspired by the experience of attending a memorial service for a friend's younger brother, who died at 44 “suddenly, in the middle of things, leaving behind a wife and two young daughters,” it is a meditation on evanescence, serendipity and the way death offers a shape, a closure that life, with all its ongoing and overlapping turmoils, cannot....
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
If truth, as they say, is stranger than fiction, sometimes it's also more compelling. In their new film, "The Sessions," costars John Hawkes and Helen Hunt found plenty of inspiration in their characters' real-life counterparts: the late Mark O'Brien, an author confined to an iron lung after contracting polio as a boy, and Cheryl Cohen Greene, the sex surrogate he enlisted to help him lose his virginity at age 38. At a recent installment of The...
NEWS
February 6, 2003
My Favorite Weekend is one of my favorite reads in Calendar Weekend. But it would be more interesting if you interviewed real people with real lives that nobody knows about, rather than fake celebrities with phony lives that nobody cares about. Dar Horn San Pedro Editor's note: Calendar Weekend's 15 Minutes With ... feature focuses on the "real people" of Southern California. Today's is on Page 19.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1990
Perhaps the solution would be to require TV executives to look at their shows two hours a week in the company of their 9-to-15-year-old children or grandchildren. Their networks might change policies. JOHN A. WOODWARD III, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Ever wonder what Bart Simpson would look like in human form? "The Simpsons" is about to show you. The long-running Fox animated series will unveil a live-action opening sequence Sunday. In it, the dysfunctional cartoon family will be seen as they would appear in real life, played by look-alike actors. A team from British network Sky One created and commissioned the live sequence. * FINALLY Streisand tour?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1991 | RICK DU BROW
TV or not TV. . . . REEL LIFE: "Real People" changed the face of TV in its five years on NBC. To many, the 1979-1984 series helped father the "infotainment" trend that spread to magazine shows and even news broadcasts--first local and now, it often appears, on the major networks as well. How logical, then, that tonight's NBC special, "Real People Reunion," with former hosts Sarah Purcell and Fred Willard, is airing at the height of TV's explosion of reality shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
For the new fact-based war movie "Lone Survivor," which details a Navy SEAL mission gone horribly awry in  the mountains of Afghanistan, leading man Mark Wahlberg had one very important resource to draw from: Marcus Luttrell, the soldier whose memoir of the same name inspired the film, and who was present for much of the cast's training and rehearsal. Luttrell's presence also impressed on Wahlberg that he had big shoes to fill.  At a recent installment of the Envelope Screening Series , Wahlberg and fellow cast member Emile Hirsch, who plays the fallen Navy SEAL Danny Dietz, discussed what it was like portraying real people, men they quickly came to see as heroes.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Supreme Court rulings have come down to us sounding like abstracts -- Brown vs. Board of Education, Dred Scott vs. Sandford. But the cases involved real, passionate people pleading impassioned causes -- life-or-death causes in some instances -- that changed the way Americans live their lives. The Proposition 8 and DOMA rulings were no exception. The name of the Proposition 8 case is Hollingsworth vs. Perry. Kristin Perry is a lesbian who, in 2009, was turned down for a California marriage license to wed her same-sex partner and parent of their four boys, Sandra Stier.
WORLD
May 16, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Four hackers who pleaded guilty to a series of high-profile cyberattacks on computers in the U.S. and Britain, including those of the CIA and Sony Pictures, were sentenced Thursday to up to 32 months in prison. The four men, all Britons, were members of the hacking group LulzSec, which flaunted its ability to break into the high-security computer networks of such targets as the United States Senate. In 2011, the group claimed responsibility for hacking into the systems of PBS, media baron Rupert Murdoch's News International and the U.S. Air Force, among other targets.
OPINION
February 18, 2013 | Gregory Rodriguez
In 2006, the last time Congress took a serious look at comprehensive immigration reform, hundreds of thousands of immigrants, legal and illegal, marched through the streets of the nation's cities. The resulting media coverage was filled with stories about real people - brown people! - whose lives would be affected by the proposed legislation. It was one of those rare moments when the public could witness the intersection of grass-roots movements, insider political maneuvering and their human consequences.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
PARK CITY, Utah -- Since opening in theaters last month, the Osama bin Laden manhunt film “Zero Dark Thirty” has intrigued audiences with its inside look at how CIA officers do their jobs. But the employees of the agency who tracked the Al Qaeda leader say that while they understand the need for dramatic license, the  Kathryn Bigelow film gets a number of details about their professional and personal lives wrong. “The individual hunches [are what] came through on 'Zero Dark,' and that's not exactly how it happens,” said Nada Bakos, who spent years as a CIA target officer, gathering intelligence that helped lead to the elimination of suspected terrorists.
IMAGE
December 16, 2012 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Deborah Nadoolman Landis has worked as a costume designer on more than 20 films over the last 40 years. Along the way, she has created several looks that have crossed into popular culture and become fashion trends. Here are a few anecdotes, in her own words. - Booth Moore ANIMAL HOUSE (1978) Back in the 1970s, there were T-shirt shops where you could have all different [images] pressed on. I thought it was funny to put "College" on the front of Bluto's sweat shirt. I had no idea that it would become so iconic, that I would be taking my son to college at the University of Miami years later, and they would be for sale in the shop.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
If truth, as they say, is stranger than fiction, sometimes it's also more compelling. In their new film, "The Sessions," costars John Hawkes and Helen Hunt found plenty of inspiration in their characters' real-life counterparts: the late Mark O'Brien, an author confined to an iron lung after contracting polio as a boy, and Cheryl Cohen Greene, the sex surrogate he enlisted to help him lose his virginity at age 38. At a recent installment of The...
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
Did an aggressive anti-smoking campaign conducted earlier this year influence people to give up smoking? There's a good chance the $54-million campaign by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention did have an effect, an article in the Annals of Internal Medicine reports. But it was short -- just three months long. And the impressive-sounding $54 million pales in comparison to the $27 million spent every day by the tobacco industry for marketing, the authors wrote. Nancy Rigotti and Melanie Wakefield described the campaign in the Annals of Internal Medicine, as well as what's known about its outcome so far. (The authors are at Massachusetts General Hospital and Cancer Council Victoria in Melbourne, Australia, respectively.)
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