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Real People

ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
It all started with an unlikely pairing of two unknowns. Back in the '80s, a couple of struggling actors named Grant Heslov and George Clooney were in Milton Katselas' famed acting class. Clooney asked Heslov, then a student at USC, if he wanted to do a scene from Neil Simon's Depression-era play "Brighton Beach Memoirs." Heslov agreed, playing the younger nerdy Eugene to Clooney's older sibling Stanley. Their chemistry worked, and shortly after, when Clooney was invited to audition for ABC, he brought Heslov along to repeat the scene.
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NEWS
January 31, 1993
Someone should tell you that TV characters are fictional. That means they are not real people and therefore we should make no attempt to model our lives after them. DOUGLAS CARRIGAN Studio City
NEWS
July 13, 1992 | John J. Goldman, staff and wire reports
The Democrats have hired a Hollywood producer, Gary Smith, to produce Broadway production numbers, "real-people" videos and other kinds of partisan promos each evening. But broadcasters, who are cutting back on their hours of prime-time coverage of the conventions this year, said they expect to carry only a small percentage of them. The networks said they would rather find "real people" of their own to react to events at the convention.
OPINION
February 18, 2013 | Gregory Rodriguez
In 2006, the last time Congress took a serious look at comprehensive immigration reform, hundreds of thousands of immigrants, legal and illegal, marched through the streets of the nation's cities. The resulting media coverage was filled with stories about real people - brown people! - whose lives would be affected by the proposed legislation. It was one of those rare moments when the public could witness the intersection of grass-roots movements, insider political maneuvering and their human consequences.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the New Yorker this week, James Wood has a fascinating essay on the narrative implications of death. Inspired by the experience of attending a memorial service for a friend's younger brother, who died at 44 “suddenly, in the middle of things, leaving behind a wife and two young daughters,” it is a meditation on evanescence, serendipity and the way death offers a shape, a closure that life, with all its ongoing and overlapping turmoils, cannot....
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | Peter Rainer
This 1995 film captures a bit of the freshness and awkwardness of the experience of first love. The two girls--Randy (Laurel Hollomon, right) and Evie (Nicole Parker, left)--are frisky and personable. They seem like real people so their budding romance strikes a few remembered chords (Cinemax Wednesday at 11 p.m.).
NEWS
November 1, 1992
Proposition T, the $23-million bond issue, would tax Santa Monica and Malibu residents for upkeep on a regional facility. This community has been incredibly generous to Santa Monica College, but real people know a smelly deal when they see one. LINDA ROSS Santa Monica
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | Kevin Thomas
A radiant Jessica Tandy stars in this 1991 TV movie as a widow who discovers the perfect way to feel useful: telling stories to children on public-access TV. But ambitious ad agency executive--and single mother--Stephanie Zimbalist, however, thinks the elegant elderly woman who has captivated her lonely young daughter (Lisa Jakub, pictured) would be perfect on a network, sponsored by a key Zimbalist client, a toy manufacturer.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | JEFF BRAZIL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Please pardon Mrs. Dease if she's a bit reluctant to tell people exactly what she's up to these days. She manages her employees' United Way campaign, which is nice. She makes sure that Maria, her precocious 14-year-old, gets in before curfew every night. You know how teen-agers are. She checks in almost daily on her first grandchild, 6-week-old Victoria Lynn. Who wouldn't?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1988
What a refreshing change to read an article about Nicaragua on the front page that is articulate, well-researched and, best of all, free of superficial labeling of the Sandinistas and what they stand for. As a U.S. citizen, who has lived in Nicaragua for 1 1/2 years, it is nice to return to Los Angeles and read an article that really is so informative and unbiased. Depicting the Sandinistas and the Nicaraguan people as real people, who make mistakes sometimes as all real people do, but admit their mistakes and try to make changes for the better; and showing them as they truly are--humanists interested in the welfare of the majority of the people in Nicaragua--are crucial in the fight to change the unjust, inhumane, unlawful foreign policy that the United States government is following in Nicaragua.
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