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Real Time With Bill Maher Television Program

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March 7, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
When his guests started talking over each other last week, host Bill Maher jumped in to scold them. After all, that kind of Springer-style cacophony did little for Maher's previous show, "Politically Incorrect." He warned the panel: "I could get Carrot Top here in a minute." Luckily, there seems to be little danger of that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2008 | Matea Gold
Add HBO's Bill Maher to the list of late-night comedians going back on the air this week. "Real Time with Bill Maher" will return from a planned hiatus and continue its fifth season Friday, HBO confirmed. But since the weekly show is coming back without its writers, Maher is scrapping his monologue and "New Rules" segment at the end of each program. Instead, the comedian will extend his guest roundtable and may field questions from his audience. He does not plan to write his material, a HBO spokesman said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2008 | Matea Gold
Add HBO's Bill Maher to the list of late-night comedians going back on the air this week. "Real Time with Bill Maher" will return from a planned hiatus and continue its fifth season Friday, HBO confirmed. But since the weekly show is coming back without its writers, Maher is scrapping his monologue and "New Rules" segment at the end of each program. Instead, the comedian will extend his guest roundtable and may field questions from his audience. He does not plan to write his material, a HBO spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2007 | Jon Caramanica, Special to The Times
WHEN Bill Maher debuted his last show, "Politically Incorrect," on Comedy Central in 1993, the concept of political correctness was still a hot button in the culture wars, a bromide from the right aimed at an ascendant left. To call someone politically correct was a jab, implying that they didn't know when to leave equal enough alone. In Maher's hands, though, its inverse -- political "incorrectness" -- became more than a slighting of liberal ideals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2007 | Jon Caramanica, Special to The Times
WHEN Bill Maher debuted his last show, "Politically Incorrect," on Comedy Central in 1993, the concept of political correctness was still a hot button in the culture wars, a bromide from the right aimed at an ascendant left. To call someone politically correct was a jab, implying that they didn't know when to leave equal enough alone. In Maher's hands, though, its inverse -- political "incorrectness" -- became more than a slighting of liberal ideals.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
When his guests started talking over each other last week, host Bill Maher jumped in to scold them. After all, that kind of Springer-style cacophony did little for Maher's previous show, "Politically Incorrect." He warned the panel: "I could get Carrot Top here in a minute." Luckily, there seems to be little danger of that.
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