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Real War

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2002
Regarding Kenneth Turan's review of "We Were Soldiers" ("Battle Saga at War With Itself," F1, Feb. 28): The logic displayed in his review is flawed at best, and displays a fundamental lack of knowledge of war and its participants that is common among those who have never experienced the hell of combat. Turan says the movie: " ... deftly sidesteps the messy question of why we were in Vietnam in the first place in favor of giving deserving soldiers the old-fashioned heroic warrior treatment."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Thomas Keneally has always been a novelist who writes and lives in the big sweep of epic history. He took on the end of the First World War in "Gossip From the Forest," the U.S. Civil War in "Confederates," and the Eritrean War of Independence in "To Asmara. " He won the Booker Prize for "Schindler's List," his account of one good German saving lives during the Holocaust. In "The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith," he told a story of racism and violence set amid his native Australia's founding as an independent nation in 1901.
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NEWS
February 25, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Dan Rather felt it, though he couldn't see it. The ground battle, he somberly told CBS viewers Sunday morning, is "real war, real pain, real bleeding, real death." Later, with more than a dash of hyperbole, he added about reported chaos in Iraqi military ranks: "Perhaps not since the Greeks retreated from Babylon has there been such a disorderly retreat." Descriptive images.
WORLD
March 29, 2013 | By David Cloud and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Obama administration officials who once hoped that North Korea's young leader could prove to be a reformer are increasingly worried that he might blunder his way into a war. Even as they publicly describe 30-year-old Kim Jong Un's recent bellicose threats as bluster, administration officials have stepped up visible demonstrations of American military power. The aim, according to current and former U.S. officials, is to highlight for the North Koreans that their Stalinist regime might not survive a war on the Korean peninsula.
SPORTS
November 15, 2003
Kellen Winslow Jr.'s postgame tirade Saturday was not only an embarrassment to the University of Miami, but a slap in the face to all those whose families have loved ones serving in a real war. Kellen, this is only a game, you are not a soldier. You say that everything you do is for the U, presumably meaning the University. Well, the reality is, your U should be an I. You drop a TD pass, you fumble, and stand over an injured player. Play football the way the game was meant to be played, with pride and honor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2000
Besides being cynical, Michael Ledeen's argument (Commentary, March 30) that to have peace you have to make war is historically flawed. World War I was a smashing victory for the Allies. But the peace bought by victory spawned Nazism, fascism and the seeds of World War II. On the other hand, the Cold War brought about lasting peace, as Ledeen rightly writes, and it did so for the reason he chooses to ignore: It was not a real war, having been fought with words, not weapons. ALFREDO A. BONADEO Santa Barbara
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1991 | ED TURNER, Turner is executive vice president of news gathering for CNN. and
Traitors. Propaganda dupes. Baghdad TV. America haters. Some of the epithets directed at CNN over the phone, the fax, telex and mail. A few poorly attended demonstrations have been held at our bureaus across the United States and in Atlanta. Why such outrage over an international news service reporting from the adversary's camp? Or, more to the point, why is CNN in Baghdad?
OPINION
July 6, 1986
I have relatives in Nicaragua. I have talked with my nephew who with his family was able to escape to Costa Rica. Nicaragua is not a helpless little Central American country! It is well equipped militarily, so well that it could move successfully and take over other countries. Nicaragua is a Kremlin base of operations. Evidently you do not see Afghanistan, Hungary, Ethiopia, the Balkans, Poland and others as "dirty little wars." You, on occasion, play up the statement: "If we give aid to the contras , we'll soon be having to send military forces to fight in Nicaragua."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1986
The letters (Sept. 4) linking mock warfare "survival games" to militarism, sadism, or fascism are way off the mark. I have played these games more than once. But somehow, I have not turned into a slavering animal who loves carnage and death. In fact, I am in favor of lower military budgets. I oppose aid to the contras in Nicaragua. My support for arms control has led me to volunteer for the Nuclear Freeze movement. Is this a contradiction? No! I play war games precisely because they are not real wars.
OPINION
March 3, 2002 | EDWARD N. LUTTWAK, Edward N. Luttwak is a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C.
The Bush administration has not decided what to do about Iraq, but if it does act to remove Saddam Hussein from power, it would use all means, including a full-scale war if absolutely necessary. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin says that he supports the war against Islamic terrorism but opposes war against Iraq. The Russian Foreign Ministry, however, rejects Iraqi requests for the unconditional removal of sanctions, insisting that Iraq must submit to "serious" U.N.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
NBC's much-hyped reality series “Stars Earn Stripes” has been roundly criticized by military veterans and peace activists alike and on Tuesday night, Stephen Colbert added his voice to the chorus of dissenters. In a withering segment broadcast in a week in which Colbert is hosting a concert aboard the aircraft carrier/tourist attraction Intrepid, Colbert argued the show isn't about “honoring the troops” so much as a disingenuous ploy to appeal to males aged 18-34. Colbert likened host Wesley Clark to the great military leaders of the past, such as Dwight Eisenhower and George Patton, but wasn't convinced the former Army general has “what it takes to be a Jeff Probst.” As for former 98 Degrees singer Nick Lachey, who described being on the show as a “once-in-a-lifetime experience for people like myself to step in there and get in the trenches,” Colbert quipped, “Yes, once in a lifetime, other than all the times you could have enlisted.” He also expressed his skepticism over the repeated claim that the challenges "Stars Earn Stripes" simulated an “authentic war experience.” “Yes this is real, with real weapons and real ammunition and real jet skis zipping in at the first sign of trouble,” Colbert said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The early, largely positive reviews for "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy," Tomas Alfredson's new big-screen version of the classic John le Carré novel, have come with an undercurrent of surprise. Le Carré's murky, tricky stories present obvious challenges to filmmakers, and "Tinker" — published in 1974 and considered one of his murkiest, trickiest books — was turned into a lauded 1979 BBC miniseries that the author himself once termed the most successful adaptation of his work. With a leisurely running time of nearly 51/2 hours over six episodes (Acorn Media has just reissued a three-disc DVD edition)
OPINION
November 10, 2007
In Mexico, the phrase "war on drugs" is not just a figure of speech. Since President Felipe Calderon took office, tens of thousands of soldiers have been deployed to battle drug cartels, and corrupt officials have been ousted. The cartels, however, haven't blinked. Almost 4,000 people have been killed in the last two years. Now the United States and Mexico have negotiated a major initiative that includes $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
In a nondescript industrial warehouse in Chatsworth, something unprecedented, emotionally risky and potentially politically volatile is going on. A drama series is being produced for television about a war that is underway -- a war where the American death toll is mounting, American public support is eroding, and there is no end in sight.
BOOKS
May 8, 2005 | Simon Singh, Simon Singh, a science writer and broadcaster based in London, is the author of "Fermat's Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World's Greatest Mathematical Problem," "The Code Book: The Science of Secrecy From Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography" and, most recently, "Big Bang: The Origins of the Universe."
Who proposed the existence of black holes? I suspect the majority of people would guess Albert Einstein, and the rest would probably plump for Stephen Hawking. In fact, the credit goes to Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, known universally as Chandra. He is one of the forgotten heroes of 20th century science, but London-based historian of science Arthur I. Miller's excellent book, "Empire of the Stars," should go some way to giving him the attention he deserves.
SPORTS
November 15, 2003
Kellen Winslow Jr.'s postgame tirade Saturday was not only an embarrassment to the University of Miami, but a slap in the face to all those whose families have loved ones serving in a real war. Kellen, this is only a game, you are not a soldier. You say that everything you do is for the U, presumably meaning the University. Well, the reality is, your U should be an I. You drop a TD pass, you fumble, and stand over an injured player. Play football the way the game was meant to be played, with pride and honor.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1994 | Howard Rosenberg
" I ducked my head under the sharp cracking that was going overhead. " --War correspondent Ernest Hemingway with U.S. troops under fire in a landing craft approaching France, June 6, 1944 Good morning, Normandy! This is an invasion.
OPINION
February 3, 2002 | BRUCE ACKERMAN
We have won the war in Afghanistan, but President Bush refuses to declare victory. Why he won't is not a mystery. Congress has not authorized a global war against all rogue states, and once the president recognizes that the Afghan war is over, his larger ambitions lack adequate legal foundation. Inflated war talk is a defining characteristic of the modern presidency; recall the war against poverty, the war against crime, the war against drugs.
NEWS
April 8, 2003 | Reuven Frank, Reuven Frank is a former president of NBC News.
The history of news is a story of technology, machines and devices moving information ever faster, until it is now instantaneous. You can't get any faster than that. We see and hear -- in "real time" -- the sights and sounds of Senate hearings, protest marches, space shuttle disasters and now, finally, wars. In classical times, war news moved as fast -- and as far -- as couriers could run.
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