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BUSINESS
July 13, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
At the Westfield Culver City mall, jeans shopper Stephanie Heredia stepped into a booth resembling an airport body scanner. In less than 20 seconds, she walked away with a printout that recommended a dozen denim styles to fit her hourglass-shaped frame. Paper in hand, she headed to JCPenney to try on a pair of size 12 boot cut Levi's. The fit was perfect. And the best part was no shimmying in and out of a stack of styles and sizes to get it. "Whenever I go shopping for jeans, I have a heck of a time," said Heredia, 50, a jewelry sales manager from Culver City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2012 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the preface to his new book "Journalism," Joe Sacco pinpoints the challenges of the comics artist who seeks to be a reporter: "Aren't drawings by their very nature subjective?" he asks, before answering with a simple "yes. " And yet, this has been Sacco's point all along, that, in the words of Edward R. Murrow, "Everyone is a prisoner of his own experiences. No one can eliminate prejudices - just recognize them. " The rap on Sacco, of course, is that he is less a journalist than an advocate, who in such works as "Palestine" and "Footnotes in Gaza" blurs the line between observer and activist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeremy Irons stars as the ruthless Rodrigo Borgia, who became Pope Alexander VI, in Showtime's period drama"The Borgias," now in its second season. You really seem like you're having fun with this role. I'm glad about that. I've always believed that in the theater or movies, whatever, the audience's enjoyment is increased if the actors seem to be enjoying what they're doing. What's fun about the Borgia pope? The great thing about doing series television is you have time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2012 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times
HILLSBORO, Ore. - The small New England town of Blithe Hollow is more than a little odd; it's a wonderfully wonky world of Gremlin-like cars, wavy plaid shirts and irregular picket fences. It has also been cursed with "eternal damnation" after a witch trial 300 years ago, making it a prime target for a zombie attack. Such is life for Norman, a misunderstood boy called upon to help fight the invasion of walking dead because he has the ability to talk with them in "ParaNorman," a 3-D stop-motion animation feature opening Aug. 17 from the team behind 2009's "Coraline.
OPINION
April 11, 2012 | By Eric J. Weiner
There is a growing student protest movement against orthodox economics that could change the field as we know it. If it is sustained, historians likely will cite Nov. 2, 2011, as the start of the revolution. On that day at Harvard University, roughly 70 students organized a walkout of an introductory economics class taught by N. Gregory Mankiw. Mankiw is the former head of the Council of Economic Advisers for President George W. Bushand an advisor to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Are bricks-and-mortar stores dead? The prognosis certainly doesn't look good. Best Buy says it will shut down 50 of its big-box stores and experiment with outlets that are 20% smaller. The electronics heavyweight also says it will slash $800 million in costs by 2015, including about 400 jobs. The problem is partly attributable to consumers' growing habit of using stores like Best Buy as storefronts for cheaper online merchants. In other words, people will check out new TVs or appliances at Best Buy and then buy them for less from the likes of Amazon.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
The Pew Research Center released a report about Facebook on Friday, providing insights into the company that you won't find in its IPO filing. Rather than focusing on the company's financials, the report, "Why Most Facebook Users Get More Than They Give," sheds light on how Facebook's 845 million users engage with Facebook and what they get out of it. The findings by the Pew Internet and American Life Project show that social interactions on...
OPINION
January 29, 2012 | By Coleen Bondy
For the first time this year, LAUSD has prepared reports for teachers that rate their effectiveness. When I received an email saying I could now view my own personal "Average Growth over Time" report, I opened it with a combination of trepidation, resignation and indignation. First, the indignation. It is, I think, the key factor that has kept me teaching past the five-year mark, when most new teachers quit the profession. I am in my sixth year of teaching after a nearly 20-year career as a professional writer.
NEWS
January 9, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
If you made a new year's resolution to quit smoking and you're counting on nicotine patches or gum to help you, you may want to reconsider: A new study finds that these and other nicotine replacement products aren't much good at preventing former smokers from relapsing. In a sample of 787 adults who had quit smoking within the previous two years, nearly one-third reported having gone back to using cigarettes. In the first wave of the study, 30.6% of recent quitters had gone back to smoking, and in the second wave of the study the figure was 31.3%.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas
With most lawmakers gone for the holidays, President Obama took full advantage of the empty stage, appearing with everyday Americans to make the case that House Republicans need to relent and pass a payroll tax cut extension that would mean an extra $1,000 a year to a typical family. Obama struck a note of disgust Thursday with the paralysis in the Capitol, making the point that only a small minority of House Republicans is blocking a tax cut extension that would help struggling families heat their homes, fuel their cars and pay for essential groceries.
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