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Realignment

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OPINION
December 20, 2012
Re "Don't blame realignment," Editorial, Dec. 11 I disagree with The Times' assertion that it's off base to amend AB 109, the state's realignment law, to require that offenders with prior convictions for violent or serious crimes be subject to stricter supervision or sentencing requirements. Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck noted that Northridge quadruple homicide suspect Ka Pasasouk "certainly would've had an increased level of scrutiny via probation or parole absent [AB]
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown, citing his meetings with law enforcement officials across the state, said Tuesday that "realignment is working. " Brown, speaking to reporters after he addressed the annual Crime Victims' Rights rally at the Capitol, called the realignment program, in which low-level felons are kept in county jails rather than sent to prisons, "encouraging and stimulating. " "I've talked to district attorneys, I've talked to police chiefs, I've talked to sheriffs," Brown said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2013 | By Kate Mather and Andrew Blankstein
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. As the investigation into a 10-year-old Northridge girl's kidnapping and sexual assault continued, an L.A. County supervisor criticized the so-called realignment program which transfers authority of some felons from state prisons to county jails. The circumstances of Tobias Dustin Summers' July 2012 release from custody were not clear. Police said Saturday that the 30-year-old had a criminal history dating back to 2002 that includes charges of kidnapping, robbery, explosives possession and petty theft.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
 Former Lt. Gov. Abel Maldonado announced Thursday that he was dropping out of the governor's race to spend more time with his family. “I know today California can do better. But after having traveled all over the state and giving it my all  I have concluded that now is not my time,” Maldonado said, according to prepared remarks. “It's time to step away for a while, and spend more time with my family and stay a little closer to home helping my community, as an active private citizen.” Maldonado's announced in April that he was considering running for governor, but his campaign hit rocky patches immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Paige St. John
Assembly Democrats continued Tuesday to bat down legislation they see as weakening Gov. Jerry Brown's prison realignment program, including a bill that would return sex offenders who violate parole to state prison. "We are tweaking a flawed program," said Assemblyman Eric Linder (R-Corona), whose bill mirrored a similar measure already voted down by the Public Safety Committee that would have allowed judges to return to prison sex offenders who violate parole. "I do think it's a little early in the game.
OPINION
January 10, 2011 | By Zev Yaroslavsky and Gloria Molina
The budget proposals Gov. Jerry Brown is expected to unveil Monday have had those of us in local government in California holding our breath. Why? Because a key component in his plan to solve the state's structural deficit will rely on a strategy known as "realignment," in which state and local governments swap various funding streams and service responsibilities. The stated aim is to restore local administrative control and stabilize unpredictable revenues. An earlier realignment scheme approved in 1991 by then-Gov.
OPINION
December 11, 2012
The fact that one of the suspected killers of four people in a Northridge home was "out on the street and not behind bars," City Councilman Mitchell Englander said last week, "underscores the dangers posed by realignment. " No, it does not. Englander has it wrong. The suspect would have been released from prison and would have been out on the street with or without AB 109, the sweeping 2011 law best known by the shorthand term "public safety realignment. " The councilman's statement and his accompanying resolution calling for a change to realignment are off-base.
OPINION
November 13, 2011
Californians shouldn't be surprised by recent reports, such as The Times' front-page story Friday, that county jails are filling up. Public safety realignment is no secret. After years of refusal to consider sentencing reforms, inability to provide adequate drug treatment, unwillingness to prepare parolees for lives outside prison and a continuing insistence on locking up more people longer, state prisons became so overcrowded that the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the population reduced.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Robert Greene
“ No Happy Anniversary for the Democrat Early Release Program ,” reads a statement from the California state Senate Republican Caucus. I can understand why they'd be unhappy at the early release of Democrats, but I don't think that's what they mean. They're referring instead to criminal justice realignment under last year's AB 109 . It took effect Oct. 1, 2011. The narrative is familiar to anyone on the email list of police unions or California Republicans and it goes like this: Democrats adopted realignment , Gov. Jerry Brown signed it into law, inmates got out of prison early, and many of these people who should still be behind bars committed new crimes, including rape, attempted murder, kidnapping and robbery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California prisons chief Jeffrey Beard says he is concerned more reductions of the state prison population would overwhelm counties already struggling with the state's 2011 realignment program. The state achieved a 25,000 reduction in its prison population by requiring counties to take on criminals from three fronts: County jails must house lower-level offenders and state parole violators, and those released from prison now go through county probation. Even so, California prisons continue to exceed population caps set by federal courts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County officials agreed Tuesday to step up lobbying of the Legislature for more money to jail and care for lower-level felons who became the responsibility of counties under state prison realignment. The law, implemented two years ago, was intended to reduce state prison populations. But it also has ended up saving the state a substantial amount of money, county Chief Executive William T Fujioka said. Next year, according to state projections, Fujioka said, California will save $2.68 billion as a result of realignment, and will give $950 million to counties to help them implement the program, realizing a net savings of $1.73 billion.
WORLD
November 25, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - The interim accord hammered out between Iran and global powers focuses narrowly on Tehran's nuclear ambitions but the reaction across the Middle East points to a broader significance: the prospect of a geopolitical shift with repercussions across the region. The process is still embryonic and may go nowhere. But the Middle East is already abuzz with speculation about a thaw between Washington and Tehran emerging from the Geneva talks. Some analysts say it may turn out to be a "hinge" moment that - however gradually - alters the political landscape of the highly volatile region.
OPINION
October 1, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Two years ago, California overhauled its criminal justice system by shifting responsibility for many felons from the state government to the counties. There is no denying that the change was abrupt. Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law the Public Safety Realignment Act, also known as AB 109, on April 4, 2011, and followed up with a companion bill that fleshed out many of the funding details in June of that year. Counties then had just three months to prepare their jails, their law enforcement agencies and their probation departments to be ready for the Oct. 1 implementation date, after which defendants convicted of lower-level felonies were sent to jails instead of state prisons, and felons released from prison after serving sentences for lower-level crimes came under the supervision of county probation officers instead of state parole agents.
SPORTS
September 29, 2013 | HELENE ELLIOTT
A year ago, the NHL was a few weeks into the third labor stoppage of Commissioner Gary Bettman's reign and fans vowed they would never come back. Now, it's all sunshine and blue skies for the league and a firmly entrenched Bettman. A settlement in January that guaranteed labor peace for at least eight years -- and possibly 10 -- kick-started an intense, 48-game schedule. The 30 teams played to a cumulative 97% of capacity, with 16 teams selling out all 24 home games and 10 more playing to 90% or more of their arena capacity.
SPORTS
September 28, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
Hello, Columbus - and Detroit too. The Blue Jackets and Red Wings were the big winners in realignment because they moved from the Western Conference to the East, which should mean less travel. Both teams had pushed for the move for years and both paid their dues. But switching the up-and-coming Blue Jackets and always-competitive Red Wings muddles the East playoff picture. Remember, too, the Atlantic and Metropolitan divisions are each made up of eight teams, not the seven in the Central and the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2013 | By Abby Sewell and Seema Mehta
Los Angeles County supervisors have agreed to shift more than 500 inmates to mountain-area firefighting camps across the region in a bid to ease jail crowding and increase the amount of time serious criminal offenders remain behind bars. The move marks the latest attempt by county officials to deal with the effects of a federal court order that forced California to reduce its prison population. Under so-called realignment, California officials are redirecting lower-level felons to local lockups, which has swelled the county's jail population and caused some local inmates to be released long before they finish their sentences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
The state's controversial push to relieve severe prison overcrowding has resulted in the Los Angeles Police Department taking dozens of officers away from regular patrol duties in order to monitor ex-convicts, according to a department report. Since state officials implemented the prison measures in late 2011, the LAPD has had between 160 to 170 officers assigned full time to units responsible for keeping tabs on thousands of felons who are living in Los Angeles after their release from prison.
SPORTS
February 26, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
The NHL revised its proposed realignment for next season to form two conferences with two divisions each and restructure the playoffs to begin with divisional matchups instead of matchups within the conference. The league sent its plan to clubs this week for their review, but it must also be approved by the NHL Players' Assn. If the union approves, the NHL's Board of Governors could vote on the proposal next week. If it passes, the new format will go into effect next season. As with its previous plan, Detroit and Columbus would move to the East.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County probation officers are at loggerheads with their chief over the way he wants them to monitor lower-level felons who have become the county's responsibility as a result of state prison realignment. The officers' union is complaining that Chief Jerry Powers wants members to make unannounced visits to the homes of probationers, but without carrying weapons. Union leaders say that's too dangerous and are threatening to sue. The issue is the latest in a series of snags in implementing AB 109, the realignment law that took effect in October 2011 to comply with a court order to relieve state prison overcrowding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | Joel Rubin
The state's controversial push to relieve severe prison overcrowding has resulted in the Los Angeles Police Department taking dozens of officers away from regular patrol duties to monitor ex-convicts, according to a department report. Since state officials implemented the prison measures in late 2011, the LAPD has had 160 to 170 officers assigned full time to units responsible for keeping tabs on thousands of felons who are living in Los Angeles after their release from prison. Prior to the new rules going into effect, the felons would have been supervised by state parole officers.
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