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OPINION
July 13, 2013
Re "Obama wings it in Egypt," Opinion, July 9 Jonah Goldberg decries President Obama's foreign policy as "winging it" and says it is characterized by constantly switching positions. If so, then by his own measure, Goldberg is guilty of the same, for his own positions always manage to be in lock-step opposition to Obama's. To paraphrase Goldberg, Obama's realist policies are just ideological ones that yield to the demands of the moment. Well, I'll take policies that are tempered by what is attainable over the neoconservatives' wishful thinking of "we create our own reality" any day. Tom Poulin Irvine ALSO: Postscript: Miracle or coincidence?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | Chris Kraul and Thomas Curwen
When Colonel Aureliano Buendia faced the firing squad, time slipped away, and his life became a dream. Before him rose the mythical town of Macondo and its retinue of gypsies and their pipes and kettle drums and magical inventions. Of course Buendia's dream belonged to the teller of the tale, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, whose novel "One Hundred Years of Solitude" casts a spell upon readers that can never be broken. A Spanish galleon lies in the jungle, its hull "an armor of petrified barnacles and soft moss," its sails dirty rags, the rigging adorned with orchids.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By John Horn
As the Oscar-winning filmmaker behind "Argo," Ben Affleck certainly knows the difference between a good spy story and a bad one. Part of his education came from novelist Tom Clancy, who died Tuesday in a Baltimore hospital. The bestselling author of espionage tales was 66. As a young actor, Affleck was cast in the 2002 film adaptation of "The Sum of All Fears," in which Affleck played Clancy's famous CIA operative Jack Ryan.  PHOTOS: Tom Clancy: 1947-2013 “I think Tom was really the first major writer in the genre to make realism the top priority," Affleck said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Every year, publishers, editors, agents and authors gather in Italy for the Bologna Children's Book Fair . This week, the buzz in Bologna is about the growing market for middle-grade fiction.  If you have a child in the 9-to-12-year-old range -- as I do -- you're grateful for the authors who write the first, prose-driven (as opposed to picture driven) books your child will read. My daughter's own reading list over the past year has included several middle-grade books, such as R.J. Palacio's 2010 “Wonder,” about a 10-year-old boy with a severe facial deformity who just wants to fit in at a mainstream school.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Realism is often ridiculed for going to great lengths to depict what we can see withour bare eyes. Its detractors, who usually prefer the abstract perambulations of Conceptual art or the mesmerizing effects of abstract painting, treat Realism as if it were a unified style. The thought is that it's the work of uninspired artists whose sworn duty it is to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. At Koplin Gallery, "Drawings V" dispels such prejudice.
OPINION
January 25, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
All last week, commentators recounted the dramatic swing in the national mood between this January and last. In 2009, President Obama was talking about bending the arc of history. In 2010, it doesn't look like he can bend enough arms to get healthcare reform through Congress. Americans are not happy. We're on the downside of a familiar cycle: the bitter disillusionment that follows outsized hope. What could be accomplished in Washington isn't matching our expectations. And although Obama's fall has been steep and hard, he's not alone.
NEWS
January 30, 1992
The commentary by Max Bena-videz ("Time to Expose Dark Side of Columbus Myth," Dec. 19) was a long-overdue call to realism in American history. It is time to recognize that the Americas were full of advanced and diverse pre-Columbian cultures--not just the usual Aztec-Maya-Inca triad. C. L. DAVIDSON Santa Fe Springs
OPINION
December 21, 2006
Re "Tyranny, realism and Jeane Kirkpatrick," Current, Dec. 17 David Rieff asserts that "liberalism and realism are too uncomfortable a fit to be enduring." That is, we have an either/or choice to take out repressive dictators (liberalism) or to ignore their repressions for the sake of stability and eventual political evolution (realism). Such a position is bad logic and worse foreign policy. "Realistic liberalism," to use Rieff's terms, was doing all right with Iraq during the 1990s, containing Saddam Hussein, greatly diminishing his civil rights abuses and wrecking his weapons of mass destruction aspirations.
NEWS
March 26, 1995
Having seen "Cracker" ("Men Should Weep," March 7, A&E) it's obvious why there was widespread protest from black and anti-rape groups in Britain when it was broadcast. It promoted the classic racist stereotype of black rapist and white victim. Black Women's Rape Action Project (BWRAP) and Women Against Rape (WAR) led the protest. "Cracker's" reputation for gritty realism is about the writer playing with his prejudices in front of viewers. The result is a throwback to myths about race and rape which black communities and women have spent many years campaigning against.
NEWS
November 1, 1987
Frightening as it may have been, "After the Promise" was very real indeed. Thank you, CBS, for telling it like it was. It paralleled my own story. Having been a young child at that time, my family and I also were placed in many of the same situations. Thank you again, CBS, for bringing to light the many truths of those dark days. Mark Harmon and the children are to be praised for their fine acting in portraying their plight with such realism. Leonora Staggs, Ventura
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
On the heels of her remarkable documentary "The Arbor," writer-director Clio Barnard returns to the Bradford area in northern England for a contemporary fable inspired by an Oscar Wilde fairy tale. In this version, "The Selfish Giant" is Kitten (Sean Gilder), the proprietor of a scrap yard, but the story centers on a character named Arbor (Conner Chapman) and his best friend, Swifty (Shaun Thomas), two misfit teenagers who skip school to scavenge metal for Kitten. Arbor's on meds for what's probably ADHD, his prescription routinely nicked by his older brother to sell on the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By John Horn
As the Oscar-winning filmmaker behind "Argo," Ben Affleck certainly knows the difference between a good spy story and a bad one. Part of his education came from novelist Tom Clancy, who died Tuesday in a Baltimore hospital. The bestselling author of espionage tales was 66. As a young actor, Affleck was cast in the 2002 film adaptation of "The Sum of All Fears," in which Affleck played Clancy's famous CIA operative Jack Ryan.  PHOTOS: Tom Clancy: 1947-2013 “I think Tom was really the first major writer in the genre to make realism the top priority," Affleck said Tuesday.
OPINION
July 13, 2013
Re "Obama wings it in Egypt," Opinion, July 9 Jonah Goldberg decries President Obama's foreign policy as "winging it" and says it is characterized by constantly switching positions. If so, then by his own measure, Goldberg is guilty of the same, for his own positions always manage to be in lock-step opposition to Obama's. To paraphrase Goldberg, Obama's realist policies are just ideological ones that yield to the demands of the moment. Well, I'll take policies that are tempered by what is attainable over the neoconservatives' wishful thinking of "we create our own reality" any day. Tom Poulin Irvine ALSO: Postscript: Miracle or coincidence?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
British filmmaker Andrea Arnold's "Wuthering Heights," the newest chapter in the novel's long, on-screen history, is so earthy and intent on authenticity that like Heathcliff and Cathy you can never escape the wind that howls across the moors, or the mud, clinging so thick on boots and body that it's tempting to check your own. Even the actors, many plucked from the Yorkshire countryside where the Emily Bronte classic is set and the movie was shot,...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
NEW ORLEANS - Compared to Schwab's Pharmacy - the old Sunset Boulevard drugstore where legend has it that a teenage Lana Turner was discovered at the soda counter - the Buttermilk Drop Bakery and Cafe doesn't display a ton of show-business shine. Occupying a former seafood eatery in the city's hardscrabble Seventh Ward, the restaurant has but a few tables. Its tile floors are chipped, the windows a bit dingy. But the food - the signature dish a deep-fried, oversized doughnut hole called a buttermilk drop - is so superior that it draws a steady stream of Garden District foodies and other hungry locals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - New Yorker drama critic John Lahr set off a social media firestorm in December with a blog comment that called for a moratorium on those "infernal all-black productions of Tennessee Williams plays unless we can have their equal in folly: all-white productions of August Wilson. " The theater community, as viewed from my portal on Facebook, found the comparison not just inept but inflammatory. Emily Mann, who happens to be directing the multiracial Broadway production of "A Streetcar Named Desire" starring Blair Underwood and Nicole Ari Parker that opens later this month at the Broadhurst Theatre, however, refused to take the bait when we spoke during a rehearsal break in March.
BOOKS
June 15, 1986 | Merle Rubin
ZOLA by Philip Walker (Routledge & Kegan Paul: $16.75; 257 pp.). Ambitious yet altruistic, publicity-seeking yet public-spirited, Emile Zola (1840-1902) was passionately determined to become what he in fact became: one of the central prophetic figures of his century. The brutal realism of such novels as "Therese Raquin," "L'Assommoir," "Nana," "Germinal," "La Terre" and "La Debacle" shocked the French reading public, outraged critics and assured his place in literary history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997
Imagine my shock to read Sean Mitchell's article on actress Julianne Moore ("Not Strictly Naked Ambition," Sept. 28) and her performance in the upcoming R-rated "Boogie Nights," where he states that Moore's role as a porn star in the film ". . . involves hard-core scenes in which she has sex on camera with Mark Wahlberg." Really! So Moore and Wahlberg, possibly in an effort to add unheard-of realism to their parts, didn't simply simulate the act but actually engaged in it, right there in front of the crew?
OPINION
March 11, 2012 | By Noah Charney
It's none too easy to get a close-up view of one of history's greatest paintings. The Ghent Altarpiece, painted in the 15th century by Jan Van Eyck and his brother Hubert, is usually encased in a glass-and-steel, humidity-controlled box in a chapel at St. Bavo's Cathedral in Ghent, Belgium. Most pilgrims can get within only about three feet of the 12-paneled masterpiece. Since 2008, conservators working for the Flemish government, the Getty Foundation and a score of other sponsors have been cleaning and analyzing the artwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Agnieszka Holland set three conditions for herself when she agreed to make "In Darkness," her harrowing new film based on the true story of a Polish petty thief and sewer worker who helped a handful of Jews escape the Nazis by hiding in sewers. First, it couldn't be shot in English, said Holland, whose credits include the feature films "Europa Europa" and "The Secret Garden" and episodes of HBO's "The Wire" and "Treme. " It had to be made in the authentic languages of Polish, German, Yiddish and Ukrainian.
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