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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
ABC's decision to yank two prime-time specials from its schedule stemmed from the particular subject matter of the two programs, not from a loss of faith in the so-called "reality-based" genre, John B. Sias, ABC Television Network Group president, said Thursday. ABC had said Wednesday that, in the wake of shelving "Crimes of Passion 2" and "Scandals II," it was re-examining "the appropriate role for reality-based programs on our schedule," with pending shows in that category to be studied on a "case-by-case" basis.
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NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Randee Dawn
In "Hyde Park on Hudson," the retelling of the visit of the king and queen of England to President Franklin D. Roosevelt in upstate New York in 1939, there's a particularly remarkable scene: Roosevelt's mother - who owned the house where everyone stayed - had purchased a brand-new toilet seat for the royals. But after they left she returned it to the store where she bought it. The shop owner was delighted, hanging the seat in his front window. That's in the movie - and it happened in real life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2001
There appeared to be a glaring omission in Mimi Avins' discussion of hourlong network "dramedies": CBS's "Judging Amy" ("Back to the Future of TV," Jan. 14). I know the women on the production team will chalk it up to "old white guy" bias, but as a guy on the team, I am at a loss for why The Times failed to include this highly successful (we just kicked "NYPD Blue's" butt in the ratings) hourlong prime-time dramedy. Certainly the playing field has changed; no one survives in the arena without a blend of drama, comedy and intellectual content.
OPINION
January 10, 2011
Gov. Jerry Brown did a good job of preparing Californians for a budget proposal that inflicts sharp pain. Even before he took office, he led two forums intended to drive home the depth of the state's fiscal crisis. His aides dropped hints, but not details, about proposals to slash Medi-Cal, return responsibility for welfare to counties, eliminate redevelopment agencies and end some tax breaks for corporations. Far more than his predecessor, who rode into office promising to cut taxes, Brown's message has been stark: We're in trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2009 | Richard Winton
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department received permission this week to develop its sixth reality-based police show in the last five years despite concerns from some law enforcement experts that such projects give a false and sensational portrayal of police work. On Tuesday, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors gave Sheriff Lee Baca approval to work with a Northern Ireland-based production company to create a series titled "Tech Force USA." The series will focus on the technology unit's efforts to use high-tech equipment to catch criminals and keep the public safe.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
"The Equalizer" and "Kate & Allie" were canceled and "Beauty and the Beast" was relegated to backup status as CBS made room Friday for 7 1/2 hours of new prime-time programming for the 1989-90 TV season. Replacing them and such first-season fare as "Jesse Hawks," "Hard Time on Planet Earth," "Live-In" and "Heartland" will be three comedies, one reality-based series and five dramas, including one in which Richard Chamberlain, who achieved stardom on "Dr. Kildare" in the early 1960s, returns to series TV as a doctor.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
After being contacted by an angry CBS network whose legal counsel had vowed to take "all action necessary" to protect the title of its reality-based fall series "Rescue 911," the producer of a similar, locally produced show said Wednesday that he will change the name of his "911" series to "On Scene." CBS would not comment, however, on whether it would consider the name change an acceptable solution. Both shows deal with actual 911 emergency calls and the life-saving efforts of paramedics, firefighters and other rescue teams.
OPINION
January 10, 2011
Gov. Jerry Brown did a good job of preparing Californians for a budget proposal that inflicts sharp pain. Even before he took office, he led two forums intended to drive home the depth of the state's fiscal crisis. His aides dropped hints, but not details, about proposals to slash Medi-Cal, return responsibility for welfare to counties, eliminate redevelopment agencies and end some tax breaks for corporations. Far more than his predecessor, who rode into office promising to cut taxes, Brown's message has been stark: We're in trouble.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
As medical conferences go, it wasn't exactly traditional. Women physicians greatly outnumbered the men at the weekend gathering in Huntington Beach. The gender imbalance (about 120 to 5) was somewhat understandable since the meeting--"Current Issues in Women's Health Care"--was sponsored by the American Medical Women's Assn., a Virginia-based organization of 11,000 women physicians and medical students.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1986 | JAY SHARBUTT
Next week, says new ABC President John B. Sias, ABC programming chief Brandon Stoddard will start deciding which of 26 comedy and drama pilots now before him will wind up as new series on the network's fall prime-time schedule. But Sias says there probably also will be a second prime-time ABC News series on the roster--although not one with a hard-news look or a traditional news-magazine format. ABC's other news series is "20/20," begun in June, 1978.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2009 | Richard Winton
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department received permission this week to develop its sixth reality-based police show in the last five years despite concerns from some law enforcement experts that such projects give a false and sensational portrayal of police work. On Tuesday, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors gave Sheriff Lee Baca approval to work with a Northern Ireland-based production company to create a series titled "Tech Force USA." The series will focus on the technology unit's efforts to use high-tech equipment to catch criminals and keep the public safe.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2005 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
Something funny is happening on television, but it has more to do with persistence and putting your money where your mouth is than the black-rimmed hidden-camera glasses on Howie Mandel's nose or the comedian's penchant for annoying strangers -- however amusing you may find that. After years of failed pilots and being disappointed by the network development mill, Mandel finally -- and literally -- has his own show. "Hidden Howie: The Private Life of a Public Nuisance" premieres at 11 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2001
There appeared to be a glaring omission in Mimi Avins' discussion of hourlong network "dramedies": CBS's "Judging Amy" ("Back to the Future of TV," Jan. 14). I know the women on the production team will chalk it up to "old white guy" bias, but as a guy on the team, I am at a loss for why The Times failed to include this highly successful (we just kicked "NYPD Blue's" butt in the ratings) hourlong prime-time dramedy. Certainly the playing field has changed; no one survives in the arena without a blend of drama, comedy and intellectual content.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD and BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President-elect George W. Bush received some bad news Monday: Not only can he expect to be skewered more often on "Saturday Night Live," but the show is moving to prime time as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2000 | JOSH MEYER and CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden on Thursday called on Court TV and its corporate parent Time Warner to stop production of a new reality television program featuring convicts recounting their crimes in grisly detail. "Time Warner Cable and Liberty Media Group have clearly stepped over the line of decency with the intent to prey on society's weaknesses by appealing to their curiosity for gore," Holden wrote in a letter to Time Warner Cable President Barry Rosenblum.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2000 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If truth is stranger than fiction, why is reality-based television so boring? Strange as it may seem, an answer to this question emerges from "Beyond Boundaries: Contemporary Photography in California," a 64-artist, 100-work survey on view at the University Art Museum at Cal State Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1993 | LEE MARGULIES
Summer is here but TV viewers aren't looking only for escape, judging by the A.C. Nielsen ratings released Tuesday for last week. "PrimeTime Live," "Dateline NBC" and "20/20" all finished in the Top 10, as did a rerun of a CBS movie about spousal abuse, "When No One Would Listen," and a first-run ABC movie about a U.S. soldier held prisoner in Vietnam, "The Last P.O.W.? The Bobby Garwood Story," starring Ralph Macchio. In addition, CBS' documentary last Wednesday about retired Gen.
OPINION
March 9, 1997 | Neal Gabler, Neal Gabler is author of "An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood." His most recent book is "Winchell: Gossip, Power and the Cult of Celebrity" (Knopf)
What struck most of us watching the bloody aftermath of the botched bank robbery in North Hollywood two Fridays ago was the feeling we had seen it all before. For more than an hour, two masked gunmen held off a phalanx of policemen by spraying the air with bullets. At one point, a gunman commandeered a pickup. At another point, the second gunman eluded officers by scurrying from one cover to another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2000 | JACK SOLOMON, Jack Solomon is professor of English at Cal State Northridge
OK, so who wants to be a millionaire? Well, let's be honest: a lot of us. I certainly would. Like Tevya, the poor milkman of "Fiddler on the Roof," I too wonder what it would be like "to be a wealthy man." It's hard not to in a society that keeps telling us that it's money that matters. Just listen to a Fortune.com radio advertisement some time. So, next question: Who would be willing to risk humiliation on national television to become a millionaire? This one's trickier.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allen Funt, who made a lifelong career out of secretly filming ordinary people reacting to the bizarre and unexpected on his television show "Candid Camera," has died at his ranch in Big Sur. He was 84. Funt suffered a stroke in 1993 from which he never fully recovered. He died Sunday afternoon of complications from the stroke, CBS spokesman Michael Naidus said Monday. "He was a tough guy," Funt's son Peter said in a statement released Monday. "When he suffered [the] stroke . . .
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