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NEWS
October 9, 1990 | LEE DEMBART
Science, after all, is limited. In the areas where it holds sway--physical reality--it has no equal in its ability to understand the world and its power to affect it. But it cannot know everything. Values and morals, for example, elude scientific proof. Where are the limits? How much can science know? Questions along this frontier turn out to be devilishly difficult and so far unresolvable. Is there a complete physical explanation for the experience we call mind?
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NEWS
November 28, 1991 | PETER CATALANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems like ages since anyone sat down to write a bare knuckles manifesto challenging our national intelligentsia. Last spring, however, New York literary agent John Brockman fired a fusillade over the bow with a short monograph he calls "The Emerging Third Culture." Brockman's essay says that scientists, not the literary Establishment, are the cream of America's brainpower, the thinkers who make the United States "the intellectual seedbed for Europe and Asia."
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NEWS
November 28, 1991 | PETER CATALANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems like ages since anyone sat down to write a bare knuckles manifesto challenging our national intelligentsia. Last spring, however, New York literary agent John Brockman fired a fusillade over the bow with a short monograph he calls "The Emerging Third Culture." Brockman's essay says that scientists, not the literary Establishment, are the cream of America's brainpower, the thinkers who make the United States "the intellectual seedbed for Europe and Asia."
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | LEE DEMBART
Science, after all, is limited. In the areas where it holds sway--physical reality--it has no equal in its ability to understand the world and its power to affect it. But it cannot know everything. Values and morals, for example, elude scientific proof. Where are the limits? How much can science know? Questions along this frontier turn out to be devilishly difficult and so far unresolvable. Is there a complete physical explanation for the experience we call mind?
BUSINESS
March 30, 1998 | LEE DYE
Scientists and technologists--often deplored, sometimes feared, frequently on the fringes of society--have become hip. They grace the covers of newsmagazines, their frequently arcane research is the stuff of bestsellers, and one of the members of their clan has become the richest man in America. Even the motion picture industry has caught on. Historically, movies have tended to portray scientists as a tad mad.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1994 | HEIDI SIEGMUND
Jacks Sugar Shack is anything but a shack. The spacious West L.A. nightclub resembles the recreation deck of the Love Boat, with ample aloha kitsch adorning the 300-capacity venue. Although one bartender says Jacks' proprietors "try to keep the place as tacky as possible"--which explains the plastic waterfall adjacent to the bar area--in reality, the club is an airy and comfortable venue for live music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2000 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Happy hour is usually decompression time from the 9-to-5 grind, but under director Michael Arabian, the Century City Club dance floor becomes a mock shrine to the rat race in John O'Keefe's one-man show "The Promotion." Todd Mandel turns in a funny, delicious performance as a pathetic, blue Beemer-owning, brown-nosing suit, Ted.
SPORTS
December 19, 1987
Am I the only person who feels that the Dodgers' decision to part with Bob Welch in favor of Griffin-Orosco-Howell represents an astonishingly stupid trade? I know the consensus seems to favor giving the club credit for at least trying something, and that the acquisition of two proven relievers and an everyday shortstop appears, on the surface, anyway, to be a fair exchange for a pitcher of Welch's talent. But in reality, the club has dealt away one of the most consistent performers in the history of the franchise for nothing of substantive value.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | CAROLYN SEE
The three novellas collected in "I Cannot Get You Close Enough" address the common problems of parents: How can I love my child enough? How can I fake the kid out if I don't love him or her? And, finally, how can I keep from passing on my own neuroses, my neural tics, my sadness, my weirdness, my greed, my self-loathing, on to the next generation? Forget it, author Ellen Gilchrist says. You cannot ever love your child enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1991 | T. H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I don't believe in Freud," says one of the characters in David Wiltse's "Doubles," at the Tamarind Theatre in Hollywood. "Whadda ya mean, ya don't believe in Freud?," says his friend, "We got pictures of the guy." That's the sort of humor Wiltse layers over his light treatment of male loneliness and male bonding within the framework of a weekly tennis game that's little more than a moment of therapy for a quartet of forlorn guys.
SPORTS
July 13, 1990 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bobby Bruch, the 23-year-old in charge of community affairs for the Los Angeles Heat, was undaunted when only 19 youngsters showed up recently for a youth soccer camp in Torrance. The turnout was disappointing, but those connected with the Heat are used to disappointment. Still, Bruch was optimistic. "We've got to start slow and build," said Bruch, who is also a forward for the struggling professional soccer franchise.
SPORTS
July 22, 1990 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bobby Bruch, the 23-year-old in charge of community affairs for the Los Angeles Heat, was undaunted when only 19 youngsters showed up recently for a youth soccer camp in Torrance. The turnout was disappointing, but those connected with the Heat are used to disappointment. Still, Bruch was optimistic. "We've got to start slow and build," said Bruch, who is also a forward for the struggling professional soccer franchise.
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