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September 25, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flouting a retreat that takes in much of Hollywood, PolyGram--the British record company whose artists include Bon Jovi and Bryan Adams--said Tuesday that it would significantly expand its filmmaking activities, earmarking $200 million for film projects during the next three years. "When things go bad, it's the right time to go in," said Alain Levy, chief executive of PolyGram. "From a strategic point of view . . .
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BUSINESS
August 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
PolyGram Buys 30% of Really Useful Entertainment: Dutch record company PolyGram NV said it bought a 30% stake in Really Useful Holdings, the entertainment firm founded by theatrical producer Andrew Lloyd Webber, composer of the stage hit "Phantom of the Opera." The deal, worth up to $157 million, includes an option for PolyGram to take a majority stake in Really Useful in 2003, the record firm said. London-based PolyGram said it had invested $115.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
PolyGram Buys 30% of Really Useful Entertainment: Dutch record company PolyGram NV said it bought a 30% stake in Really Useful Holdings, the entertainment firm founded by theatrical producer Andrew Lloyd Webber, composer of the stage hit "Phantom of the Opera." The deal, worth up to $157 million, includes an option for PolyGram to take a majority stake in Really Useful in 2003, the record firm said. London-based PolyGram said it had invested $115.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1990
Re Jan. 31's "DGA Nominations Further Muddle Oscar Race": Directors Guild, Directors Guild, The votes are in, the beans are spilled, Fine worthy guys you chose to name, But . . . no Spike on the Wall of Fame? BARRY SPACKS, Visiting Professor, English, UC Santa Barbara
BUSINESS
September 25, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flouting a retreat that takes in much of Hollywood, PolyGram--the British record company whose artists include Bon Jovi and Bryan Adams--said Tuesday that it would significantly expand its filmmaking activities, earmarking $200 million for film projects during the next three years. "When things go bad, it's the right time to go in," said Alain Levy, chief executive of PolyGram. "From a strategic point of view . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew Lloyd Webber, whose four productions of "Phantom of the Opera" in North America are grossing more than $3 million a week, has decided to postpone the making of the film version of the musical until next summer. The announcement on Friday caused further speculation that the July breakup of Lloyd Webber's six-year marriage to singer Sarah Brightman, the original star of the stage version, would cause her to be dropped from the film's lead.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1986 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Times Staff Writer
A one-week public offering of 5 million shares in "Cats" composer Andrew Lloyd Webber's Really Useful Group theatrical company received "a lukewarm reception," according to the Financial Times of London. Michael Campbell Bowling, a London securities dealer, told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday that "from Webber's point of view (the offering) was obviously a great success because it worked and they got what they wanted."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1987 | BARBARA ISENBERG
The first-act curtain came down, and the audience rushed out of the auditorium. They pushed and they shoved. They packed the lobby so tight you could only move if the person in front of you moved. Forget the bar and the bathrooms. This crowd knew its priorities. These people had only 15 minutes to shop. I was at "The Phantom of the Opera," the new Andrew Lloyd Webber musical. Assuming I was in line for the ladies' room, or maybe the bar, I held my ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew Lloyd Webber, whose four productions of "Phantom of the Opera" in North America are grossing more than $3 million a week, has decided to postpone the making of the film version of the musical until next summer. The announcement on Friday caused further speculation that the July breakup of Lloyd Webber's six-year marriage to singer Sarah Brightman, the original star of the stage version, would cause her to be dropped from the film's lead.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1990
Re Jan. 31's "DGA Nominations Further Muddle Oscar Race": Directors Guild, Directors Guild, The votes are in, the beans are spilled, Fine worthy guys you chose to name, But . . . no Spike on the Wall of Fame? BARRY SPACKS, Visiting Professor, English, UC Santa Barbara
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1986 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Times Staff Writer
First-day response was strong here Tuesday to a public offering of 5 million shares in "Cats" composer Andrew Lloyd Webber's Really Useful Group theatrical company. While one British journalist called Really Useful Group essentially a "one-man band," demand for the company's prospectus, which includes an application for shares, was "tremendous," according to Barry Dargan, an executive at Phillips & Drew stockbrokers. The final price of shares should be "reasonably higher" than the 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1998 | SUSAN KARLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The press conference schedule simply said Edward Windsor. No title. No mention of a royal lineage. Just a name, as he wants to be known in the television business. But this wasn't your average executive. Around banquet tables of English tea and finger sandwiches, surrounded by draping velvet banners and classical music, nearly 200 American media reporters anxiously awaited a close encounter with a real live member of British royalty at a Pasadena hotel.
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