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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2009
Defend the Realm The Authorized History of MI5 Christopher Andrew Alfred A. Knopf: 1,056 pp., $40
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
November 2, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt
We've watched workout wear go from baggy, ratty sweats and tees to clothes that can go all the way to dinner. Given the sport influences in high fashion and on the streets, where one of the latest looks is stylish gym shoes paired with skirts, it's no surprise that more fitness wear companies are getting into fashion. Here are some brands that have caught our eyes recently, in part because they are offering everything from in-house classes, recipes and wellness lectures to online workout videos, playlists and a magazine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | Robert Abele
If you've seen Patton Oswalt do stand-up, it's clear that he understands obsession. Easily cranked up about a wide variety of personal passions -- comic books, film noir, molecular gastronomy -- his act riffs on the hilarities of fanboy excitement and its emotional corollary: mercury-spiking indignation. Only an avowed foodie could fume so brilliantly (and famously) on KFC's everything-lumped-together menu option, which he memorably termed a "failure pile in a sadness bowl." That the 40-year-old comedian can currently be seen playing a lonely, easily peeved, rabid New York Giants buff in the independent film "Big Fan" isn't lost on a supergeek like himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy and Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday vetoed legislation that would have made California the first state in the nation to allow legal immigrants who are not citizens to serve on juries. The governor's action runs counter to his recent approval of bills expanding the rights of immigrants, including legislation allowing those in the country illegally to apply for driver's licenses and practice law. Brown said serving on a jury, however, was a high civic duty that should be exclusive to citizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Madonna's new film on the impoverished nation of Malawi has wowed another maker of documentaries: Michael Moore. Moore says that Madonna, like himself a Michigan native, will appear for a screening of "I Am Because We Are" during the state's Traverse City Film Festival on Aug. 2. Moore helped establish the festival in 2005. "She's sort of entered my realm," Moore said. "When I saw it, I thought, 'Wow, it's like she's been making these films for years.' "
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2012 | By Jevon Phillips
The zombie craze has even hit "Once Upon a Time" -- and this "Into the Deep" episode provided the opportunity for the undead to be reanimated. It was Cora, who seems to be on the minds of everyone in one way or another now, who was the reanimator and the cog that is pushing everyone along. The first thing she does is shed Capt. Hook, her supposed ally who is really out for himself. With Emma having given him the slip and taken the magic compass, she'd rather go back to her heart room, animate some corpses, and go after Snow White, Emma Swan, Mulan and Princess Aurora to get the compass herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
There's hardly any electricity to match the unfolding of a clockwork-smooth British thriller, and "Defense of the Realm" is one of the most electrifying. Terrifying in its political "what ifs," keenly intelligent, played by one of those dream British casts and full of scenes that leave us limp from controlled tension, it's a beautiful job all around. (It opens today at the Beverly Cineplex, Goldwyn Pavilion, Esquire, and Town & Country.
OPINION
December 3, 2008
Re "Panel takes up rail safety," Nov. 28 Regarding the question of the proposed Expo Line endangering students at Dorsey High and the Foshay Learning Center, I am open to arguments. Apparently, Councilman Bernard C. Parks is not. Parks' comment in The Times' story -- "They're saying we're going to build something that kills kids. ... It's not something in the realm of possibility" -- is pretty mind-boggling. The Blue Line has killed 65 pedestrians since it was built in 1990, yet Parks says that anyone being killed on the Expo Line is "not in the realm of possibility"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1988
The keynote address at the Democratic Convention was the first indication that we would elect a Republican President in November. The one-liners continued during the campaign. Sen. Lloyd Bentsen was particularly adept with its use. Outside the realm of slapstick entertainment, the voting population is repulsed by this method of communication. This decided the election. JAMES W. ROACH JR. Long Beach
SPORTS
July 25, 1987
The nerve of those Kansas City Royal fans is beyond me. Screaming and yelling at Bo Jackson for wanting a little extracurricular activity. I would just love to see their reactions if Bo's NFL rights were held by the Chiefs and not the Raiders. Would it then still be out of the realm of possibility for Bo to play two sports? DOV REICHMAN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2013 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Nagisa Oshima, an iconoclastic Japanese director and screenwriter best known in the West for the sexually explicit films "In the Realm of the Senses" and "Empire of Passion," died Tuesday at a hospital near Tokyo, his production company announced. He was 80. Widely considered one of his country's greatest filmmakers, Oshima died of pneumonia at a hospital near Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, according to the announcement from Oshima Productions. He had been in and out of hospitals since suffering a stroke more than a decade ago. Oshima's first film, "A Town of Love and Hope," a searing depiction of the connections between poverty and crime, debuted in 1959.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2012 | By Jevon Phillips
The zombie craze has even hit "Once Upon a Time" -- and this "Into the Deep" episode provided the opportunity for the undead to be reanimated. It was Cora, who seems to be on the minds of everyone in one way or another now, who was the reanimator and the cog that is pushing everyone along. The first thing she does is shed Capt. Hook, her supposed ally who is really out for himself. With Emma having given him the slip and taken the magic compass, she'd rather go back to her heart room, animate some corpses, and go after Snow White, Emma Swan, Mulan and Princess Aurora to get the compass herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Rick Schultz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of the realities of a musician's life is that sometimes he or she must work on a birthday. After performing a demanding program of Mozart, Berg, Liszt and Bartók and then three encores, French pianist Hélène Grimaud was called back to the Walt Disney Concert Hall stage on Wednesday to the strains of "Happy Birthday" sung by the audience. Grimaud, who turned 43, last appeared at Disney Hall in 2007, but an episode of heart arrhythmia forced her to end that recital at intermission.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Attempts at musical crossover pairings aren't always successful, sometimes resulting in more clash than chemistry. In the case of Broadway star Kelli O'Hara and operatic baritone Nathan Gunn, their recent onstage collaborations apparently have proved to contain the latter, in abundance. On Monday, O'Hara and Gunn will appear in a concert of classic Broadway show tunes at the Valley Performing Arts Center in Northridge. The program includes extended scenes from "Carousel" and "Show Boat," as well as songs by Cole Porter, Kurt Weill and Leonard Bernstein.
HEALTH
October 3, 2012 | Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It's been a rough week. A few days ago, at UCLA's Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital, 6-year-old Jani toppled a food cart and was confined to her room. She slammed her head against the floor, opening a bloody cut that sent her into hysterics. Later, she kicked the hospital therapy dog. Jani normally likes animals. But most of her animal friends -- cats, rats, dogs and birds -- are phantoms that only she can see. January Schofield has schizophrenia. Potent psychiatric drugs -- in doses that would stagger most adults -- seem to skip off her. She is among the rarest of the rare: a child seemingly born mentally ill. She suffers from delusions, hallucinations and paroxysms of rage so severe that not even her parents feel safe.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
The 5600 block of Atlantic Avenue doesn't look like much at first glance, especially if you're zipping through at 45 mph. A dry cleaner, a pupuseria , a T-shirt shop and a medical marijuana dispensary line the low-rise street in the North Village Annex section of Long Beach. About a third of the storefronts are vacant. But if you climb out of the car, you'll notice that this classic commercial strip - convenient for drivers, charmless and alienating for everybody else - is in the midst of a remarkable evolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000
Robots have moved out of the realm of science fiction. Today, these human-like machines can retrieve books for library patrons, assemble products for manufacturing companies, assess damage in radioactive accidents and investigate the wonders under the sea and in outer space. Explore the world of robots and learn about their history, uses and construction through the direct links on The Times' Launch Point Web site. Go to: http//www.latimes.com/launchpoint/
OPINION
March 28, 2005
Margaret Wertheim's article, "Why Science Can't Show Us God" (Commentary, March 22), makes the argument that material science can say nothing about sin, grace or heaven and therefore cannot show us God. I would look at this issue on the more basic level of the definitions of "science" and "God." The American Heritage Dictionary defines God as "a being of supernatural powers or attributes" and science as "the observation, identification, description, experimental investigation and theoretical explanation of natural phenomena."
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times Food editor
Kona on the Big Island is known for its coffee. But almost as impressive is its landscape, which rises from the ocean to more than 6,000 feet high in just a few short miles. The best way to get your arms around both of these attributes at the same time is by taking the Kona Coffee & Craters tour offered by Hawaii Forests and Trails. Start by piling into the back of an open-sided Pinzgauer all-wheel-drive touring vehicle and bouncing through what seems like every one of the island's climate zones from rain forest to alpine peak in the short 45-minute drive up the side of the mountain Hualalai volcano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Coiled around a wind-swept hill near this city's lively Mission District, Bernal Heights takes an almost cult-like pride in being insular. With a butcher, grocer, bookstore and bakery, the neighborhood provides the basics. When you add to that some unique establishments - like an organic baby food outlet and a knife-sharpening venture offering classes in Japanese whetstone techniques - many residents say they rarely feel the urge to leave. "It's this weird little borderline utopia," said Ken Shelf, 42, who runs a combination movie-rental and succulent store here.
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