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Reapportionment California

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NEWS
December 12, 1990 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's Democratic and Republican congressmen have been at each other's throats for so long, it is all but impossible to get them to sit down together. And now it seems that relations within the state's GOP delegation may not be much better. Only hours after Rep. Jerry Lewis (R-Highland) turned back a concerted challenge to his position as the House's third-ranking Republican leader early this month, he suffered an embarrassing defeat at the hands of his own California GOP colleagues.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A statewide Latino political organization filed suit in federal court Monday, challenging redistricting boundaries in a bid to increase Latino representation in Sacramento and Washington. Lawyers for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund charged that new boundaries for four congressional districts and two state Senate districts were designed to keep white incumbents in power.
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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drawing of new congressional district lines for the 1992 elections could produce as many as 100 hotly contested races for seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, the head of a Democratic task force on reapportionment said Thursday. Rep. Vic Fazio (D-West Sacramento) forecast a major struggle between Democrats and Republicans for control of the House in the wake of population changes that will benefit California and other Sun Belt states while hurting the Northeast and Midwest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County would lose one Democratic congressman and gain a new one under a proposed redistricting plan unveiled Friday. Congressman Elton Gallegly (R-Simi Valley) would hand off Oxnard and Port Hueneme to Congresswoman Lois Capps (D-Santa Barbara) under the new plan, while Congressman Brad Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks) would be edged out of the Conejo Valley portion of his district altogether.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
The California Legislature, which reconvenes today, has such a poor public image that most voters think it is commonplace for lawmakers to take bribes, the Los Angeles Times Poll has found. Voters believe overwhelmingly that most legislators "are for sale" to fat-cat campaign contributors, the survey showed. In fact, voters largely assume that all of state government--the executive as well as legislative branches--"is pretty much run by a few big interests." Gov.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As the campaign turns into its final weekend, Democrats and Republicans remain locked in tight races for the governorships of rapidly growing Florida, Texas and California--the decisive battles in the parties' decade-long struggle to control next year's congressional redistricting. In California, some polls show Republican Sen. Pete Wilson with a narrow lead over Democrat Dianne Feinstein, although on Thursday the Los Angeles Times Poll showed the race too close to call. In Florida, former Sen.
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ramon Acosta Jr. can look at his balance sheet and see how quickly the Latino community is growing in Santa Ana. Business at his furniture store on Broadway has more than quadrupled since he opened five years ago, serving an almost exclusively Latino market. When state Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Garden Grove) visited the store during a recent tour of businesses in his district, Acosta proudly reported that despite the recession, he was forecasting a 50% increase in sales this year.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Given a chance to voice their anti-incumbent sentiment, California voters Tuesday took the first step toward overhauling the state's congressional delegation by nominating dozens of new faces to run in the fall election. A total of at least 30 Republican and Democratic newcomers were chosen to represent the two major parties in November and compete for 15 open seats in California.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a rare move, the California Supreme Court will hear arguments today on the constitutionality of a state voter initiative--this one about redistricting--before it even appears on the ballot.
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a highly unusual move, the California Supreme Court decided Monday to pull from the March 7 primary ballot an initiative that would slash state legislators' pay and transfer reapportionment responsibility from the Legislature to the state high court. In a 5-2 ruling written by Chief Justice Ronald M. George, the court said Proposition 24 violates a state constitutional rule that limits initiatives to a single subject.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County could lose an Assembly district and some cities could be moved into new districts represented by Los Angeles County-based legislators under a preliminary redistricting plan by state Republicans that has upset elected city and county officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The final weeks of the year for the California Legislature are always filled with motion and chaos, but this year's end-of-session blitz, which begins today, could be more frenetic than most. In addition to the usual raft of last-minute legislation, the session's closing weeks will be enlivened by Gov. Gray Davis' proposed bailout of Southern California Edison, a controversial notion with significant opposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Legislature will start work in earnest Monday on what many members admit is their most self-serving, interest-conflicted and partisan ritual: carving new political boundaries for themselves and Californians in Congress. The outcome, virtually a foregone conclusion because Democrats control the Legislature and governor's office, is certain to further cement Democrats as the dominant party in the Senate, Assembly and the state's House delegation for the next decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2001 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Redistricting, the decennial rite of adjusting congressional and legislative boundaries, used to be such an arcane process that California legislators once hired rocket scientists with mainframe computers to help them draw the maps. Today, virtually anyone with an average Pentium-powered desktop and an above-average interest in politics can design voting districts faster and more accurately than anything a mainframe could generate just a decade ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Now that the numbers are out, the jockeying begins. The release of the 2000 census data officially inaugurates redistricting season--a mad scramble by political parties and pressure groups to carve up California to suit their needs. The state's population grew more slowly than it has in decades, meaning that there will be only one additional congressional seat in California--the smallest gain in 80 years--to accommodate an increasingly diverse array of interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Now that the numbers are out, the jockeying begins. The release of the 2000 census data officially inaugurates redistricting season--a mad scramble by political parties and pressure groups to carve up California to suit their needs. The state's population grew more slowly than it has in decades, meaning that there will be only one additional congressional seat in California--the smallest gain in 80 years--to accommodate an increasingly diverse array of interests.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court gave states, including California, a bit more leeway Monday in redrawing electoral districts after the next census. In a unanimous ruling, the justices revived a disputed, squiggly-shaped North Carolina congressional district that contains a large number of black voters and has been represented by a black Democrat.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
California will gain just one congressional seat as a result of the 2000 census, the smallest number in 80 years. Still, with 53 members, California will have the largest House delegation in history. The delegation already is overwhelmingly Democratic, as is the state Legislature.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
California will gain just one congressional seat as a result of the 2000 census, the smallest number in 80 years. Still, with 53 members, California will have the largest House delegation in history. The delegation already is overwhelmingly Democratic, as is the state Legislature.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In addition to tackling the state's energy crisis, California lawmakers this year will carve out new legislative and congressional districts, a key political exercise based on results of the U.S. Census. Republicans realize they are not likely to fare well in the reapportionment, given their minority status in the Legislature. Among Republicans' top priorities is maintaining unity in both houses so they can fight any Democratic gerrymandering.
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