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Reapportionment Montana

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NEWS
April 1, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld Congress' 50-year-old method of allocating seats in the House of Representatives, a ruling that will cost Montana one of its two seats in the chamber. The unanimous decision is good news for the state of Washington, which could have lost the ninth seat it gained after the 1990 census.
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NEWS
April 1, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld Congress' 50-year-old method of allocating seats in the House of Representatives, a ruling that will cost Montana one of its two seats in the chamber. The unanimous decision is good news for the state of Washington, which could have lost the ninth seat it gained after the 1990 census.
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NEWS
December 17, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of suspected illegal immigrants who are picked up by federal immigration agents each year may be barred from working while they contest their deportations, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. Ending an eight-year legal battle, the high court ruled unanimously that the immigration laws were intended to preserve jobs for U.S. citizens. Moreover, the U.S. attorney general has broad authority to set rules governing deportable people, the justices said.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This year, Montana chooses a future. The turbulent winds of wide-open Western politics will prevail either to the left or to the right just as sure and strong as the spring Chinooks blow warm out the Rockies. Here in the Beaverhead Valley, the streets are empty, and it's high noon at a local meeting hall. The audience is sprinkled with cowboys--real cowboys--small-town merchants, mothers, children, a hunting guide, a few local politicians and some retirees.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This year, Montana chooses a future. The turbulent winds of wide-open Western politics will prevail either to the left or to the right just as sure and strong as the spring Chinooks blow warm out the Rockies. Here in the Beaverhead Valley, the streets are empty, and it's high noon at a local meeting hall. The audience is sprinkled with cowboys--real cowboys--small-town merchants, mothers, children, a hunting guide, a few local politicians and some retirees.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State legislatures pushing to decide how to reapportion their states' congressional districts may be in for a nasty jolt. Just as the legislators are nearing the end of the process, the courts are threatening to send them back to their computers to start anew. BACKGROUND: The issue involves one of the oldest debates in the nation's history: What is the fairest way to calculate how many congressional seats that each state should have?
NEWS
December 17, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of suspected illegal immigrants who are picked up by federal immigration agents each year may be barred from working while they contest their deportations, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. Ending an eight-year legal battle, the high court ruled unanimously that the immigration laws were intended to preserve jobs for U.S. citizens. Moreover, the U.S. attorney general has broad authority to set rules governing deportable people, the justices said.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State legislatures pushing to decide how to reapportion their states' congressional districts may be in for a nasty jolt. Just as the legislators are nearing the end of the process, the courts are threatening to send them back to their computers to start anew. BACKGROUND: The issue involves one of the oldest debates in the nation's history: What is the fairest way to calculate how many congressional seats that each state should have?
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