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NEWS
December 10, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, acting in a Louisiana case with far-reaching implications for civil rights and politics, said Friday that it would rule on whether the Constitution allows lawmakers to use the race of voters as a criterion for drawing electoral boundaries.
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NEWS
April 19, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just in time for the season of political redistricting, the Supreme Court on Wednesday gave states more leeway in creating electoral districts that favor blacks, Latinos and other minorities. The 5-4 ruling steps back from a series of recent rulings that condemned "racial gerrymandering" in the South. While the Constitution usually bars the government from making decisions based on race, states can make decisions for partisan political reasons, the justices said Wednesday.
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NEWS
May 11, 1992 | From The Times's Washington staff
THE LATEST LINE: These are glum days for Democrats on Capitol Hill. At the moment, they're expected to lose 20 to 35 House seats in November. Factors at work include redistricting, which favors Republicans in several states, and retirements. That list includes about twice as many Democrats as Republicans. . . .
NEWS
October 7, 1998 | Associated Press
Immigration is significantly affecting which states will come out ahead in the redistribution of House seats, says a study released Tuesday. The Center for Immigration Studies, a think tank that favors lower immigration, said the concentration of new immigrants in just a few states, including California, resulted in six states losing House seats after the 1990 census. It predicted that seven more would lose seats after the 2000 census.
NEWS
July 9, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and RONALD BROWNSTEIN
NEW YORK REDUX: Unless all the insiders are wrong, the Democrats are heading back to New York for their 1992 presidential nominating convention. That's because the Big Apple has come up with more money than its only competitor, New Orleans. The Democratic National Committee, decided that New York's $20-million package was an offer it couldn't refuse. And New Orleans' bid was clouded by the Louisiana Legislature's recent effort to adopt the nation's strictest abortion bill.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
House Democrats announced a fund-raising drive in anticipation of perhaps 18 congressional districts shifting toward the Republicans after the 1990 Census. The campaign, IMPAC 2000, will try to raise $1 million to help Democrats keep or win state offices before congressional districts are redrawn. With six or seven new seats in California at stake, Rep.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drawing of new congressional district lines for the 1992 elections could produce as many as 100 hotly contested races for seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, the head of a Democratic task force on reapportionment said Thursday. Rep. Vic Fazio (D-West Sacramento) forecast a major struggle between Democrats and Republicans for control of the House in the wake of population changes that will benefit California and other Sun Belt states while hurting the Northeast and Midwest.
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
The intensive comings and goings at Washington's staid old University Club earlier this month might well have caused unease among the security detail next door at the Soviet Embassy. In fact, a plot of sorts was being hatched behind the club's brick walls, where nonstop brainstorming went on for the better part of two days. But the scheme was not aimed at the Kremlin.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Urban Affairs Writer
Flanked by some of the city's Latino leaders, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley on Monday all but promised a lawsuit if Congress and the President approve a measure that would lower the status of illegal aliens in the 1990 Census. The measure, passed by the Senate on Friday, would exclude illegal aliens from the census count that will be used to reapportion the House of Representatives. Sponsored by Sen. Richard C. Shelby (D-Ala.
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | From Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court turned Louisiana's election process upside down yet again Thursday, restoring--at least temporarily--a second majority-black congressional district. The high court granted an emergency request by the state and the Justice Department to block new congressional districts imposed by a lower court. U.S. Rep. Cleo Fields (D-La.) called the Supreme Court's action "a great step in the right direction for voting rights across America."
NEWS
December 10, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, acting in a Louisiana case with far-reaching implications for civil rights and politics, said Friday that it would rule on whether the Constitution allows lawmakers to use the race of voters as a criterion for drawing electoral boundaries.
NEWS
October 8, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, 39 blacks were elected to the House of Representatives, a historic high-water mark that civil rights advocates saw as a culmination of the Voting Rights Act. Not only were blacks in the South finally guaranteed the right to vote, but a series of 1982 amendments to the law assured that electoral boundaries were drawn so that they had a real chance "to elect representatives of their choice."
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | From Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court turned Louisiana's election process upside down yet again Thursday, restoring--at least temporarily--a second majority-black congressional district. The high court granted an emergency request by the state and the Justice Department to block new congressional districts imposed by a lower court. U.S. Rep. Cleo Fields (D-La.) called the Supreme Court's action "a great step in the right direction for voting rights across America."
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | From The Times's Washington staff
THE LATEST LINE: These are glum days for Democrats on Capitol Hill. At the moment, they're expected to lose 20 to 35 House seats in November. Factors at work include redistricting, which favors Republicans in several states, and retirements. That list includes about twice as many Democrats as Republicans. . . .
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State legislatures pushing to decide how to reapportion their states' congressional districts may be in for a nasty jolt. Just as the legislators are nearing the end of the process, the courts are threatening to send them back to their computers to start anew. BACKGROUND: The issue involves one of the oldest debates in the nation's history: What is the fairest way to calculate how many congressional seats that each state should have?
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A panel of federal judges issued an injunction Friday blocking reapportionment of the U.S. House of Representatives based on the 1990 Census. In Washington, a spokesman said the Justice Department was considering an appeal of the ruling to the Supreme Court. In the meantime, however, the ruling clouds the entire national redistricting process, the tortuous political tug-of-war in which district lines for congressional seats are redrawn following every national census.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican National Chairman Lee Atwater said Wednesday that next year's California gubernatorial campaign will be the "No. 1 race" in the country because of its potential impact on the nationwide struggle for reapportionment of congressional seats. As things stand in the competition for the seat, Republican Gov. George Deukmejian will vacate after two terms and U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson is all but assured the Republican nomination. Atty. Gen. John K.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just in time for the season of political redistricting, the Supreme Court on Wednesday gave states more leeway in creating electoral districts that favor blacks, Latinos and other minorities. The 5-4 ruling steps back from a series of recent rulings that condemned "racial gerrymandering" in the South. While the Constitution usually bars the government from making decisions based on race, states can make decisions for partisan political reasons, the justices said Wednesday.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In state capitols around the nation, political activists and legislators armed with maps, computers and block-by-block bytes of census data are opening a new front in the furious national debate over affirmative action, quotas and reverse discrimination. At issue is the arcane decennial process of revising district lines for Congress and state legislatures.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the largest gathering of Latino elected officials convenes here today, there will be many political successes to celebrate. From 1989 to 1990, 221 more Latinos were elected to serve in Congress, statehouses, county buildings, city halls and school board rooms across the nation. But during the two-day annual convention of the National Assn.
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