Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReapportionment
IN THE NEWS

Reapportionment

NEWS
August 16, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Democrats at last month's National Governors' Conference grumbled that their party was letting President Bush off the hook too often, New Jersey's James J. Florio had a ready rejoinder: "Republicans have been playing pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey," Florio said. "Now, it's time to pin the tail on the elephant."
Advertisement
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON
The two dozen Republicans who represent California in Congress usually give far closer scrutiny to Democratic plots on Capitol Hill than those in the state Capitol. With good reason: Republicans here have their hands full managing a precarious majority in the House of Representatives and a somewhat firmer majority in the Senate against the maneuvers of a wily Democratic president.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a potentially far-reaching political setback for blacks and Latinos, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that the Constitution does not permit "racial gerrymandering" for the purpose of electing minority candidates. State officials violate the guarantee of equal treatment for all when they draw electoral boundaries so as "to segregate voters into separate voting districts because of their race," said Justice Sandra Day O'Connor for the court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1989 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
Three of Los Angeles County's leading black organizations entered the legal battle Monday over redrawing supervisorial district lines, saying that unless their interests are represented, black voters could suffer a loss of political influence. The local chapters of the NAACP, the Urban League and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference filed suit to intervene in the court cases filed against the county last year by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glendale, Burbank and Pasadena have become California's most fiercely contested political battleground this year, strategists say, with candidates for Congress and the Legislature raising more than $10 million. Feeding the flood of cash are the districts' pivotal roles in power struggles in Sacramento and Washington. State and national party leaders have said they will spend whatever it takes to capture the swing districts where the San Gabriel and San Fernando valleys meet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1993 | CAROL WATSON and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles City Council candidate Laura Newman Chick on Monday became the latest in a long line of political hopefuls to advocate breaking up the Los Angeles Unified School District--an issue of increasing importance in the mayoral and council races. Chick, a Tarzana businesswoman running for the 3rd Council District seat representing the southwestern San Fernando Valley, said that breaking up the district would give control of the schools back to local communities.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | Associated Press
President Reagan said in an interview broadcast Thursday night that some homeless people sleep on grates or on the grass from "their own choice" instead of going to shelters. In the television interview with ABC News, Reagan was asked by David Brinkley for his views on the homeless, noting that some of them sleep in a park about 200 yards from the Oval Office, where the interview was taped Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1992 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reacting to a promise by a top state lawmaker to fight for creation of a separate San Fernando Valley school district, activists representing political, educational and parent interests throughout the city charged Thursday that secession would harm minority students without producing the radical restructuring Los Angeles schools need. State Sen. David A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2006 | George Skelton
We still can't be sure whether a promise made by Democratic legislative leaders last year was sincere or merely sweet talk in the heat of passion. Was it a real commitment? Or just that all's fair in politics? This was the promise, you may recall: If voters would reject Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's political redistricting reform -- stripping lawmakers of the power to draw their own district lines -- the Legislature would place a better measure on the 2006 ballot.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
By striking down a Georgia congressional redistricting plan that paved the way for a black Democrat to win a House seat, the Supreme Court virtually guaranteed Thursday that additional court cases will be necessary to clarify how districts may be drawn to account for changing political realities in several Southern states.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|