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Rear Admiral

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Retired Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer, who was known as the "Father of Aegis," the Navy's primary air-defense weapon system that revolutionized how the Navy performed air defense, has died. He was 83. Meyer, who managed the development and early building of the Aegis system and later had an Aegis-equipped destroyer named after him, died of heart failure Tuesday at a hospital in Washington, D.C., said his son James. Meyer had been director of engineering at the Naval Ship Missile Systems Engineering Station in Port Hueneme before he was recalled to Washington and reported to the Naval Ordnance Systems Command as Aegis Weapon System manager in 1970.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2009 | Dan Weikel
Retired Rear Adm. David M. Stone, who once headed the Transportation Security Administration and was the first federal security director at Los Angeles International Airport in the critical months after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, has died. He was 57. Stone's untimely death occurred over the weekend, several days after attending an awards ceremony for TSA employees in Arlington, Va., agency officials said. He had traveled to the event from his home in Bangalore, India, where he worked for Cisco Systems Inc. as a senior executive in charge of safety and security.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1996 | KENNETH R. WEISS
John V. Chenevey, commanding officer of the Point Mugu and China Lake Navy bases, was promoted to rear admiral Monday in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., a Navy spokesman said. Chenevey took command of the Naval Air Warfare Center, Weapons Division, in July, overseeing the Navy's missile-testing operations at Point Mugu and its sister base at China Lake, in the upper Mojave Desert.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2009 | By Joshua Drobnyk
Rep. Joe Sestak needs a comb. His wavy, graying hair has been through a hectic morning, and the Pennsylvania Democrat is racing toward his third interview of the day, this time with ABC News. "Nobody under 40 carries a comb," he says. "See, watch this." Sestak, 57, looks at one of the young aides rushing ahead of him up an escalator in the Capitol Visitor Center: "Do you have a comb?" The staffer answers nervously: "No, sir." Primped or not, Sestak's life as a Senate candidate is a constant scramble to get his face on the air or his words in print, a frantic push to paint a portrait of himself for state voters -- and anyone else with the time to listen -- as he fights to get noticed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2008 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
George Morrison, 89, a retired Navy rear admiral and the father of the late rock icon Jim Morrison, died in a Coronado, Calif., hospital Nov. 17 after a fall. Once the youngest admiral in the Navy, Morrison had a long career that included serving as operations officer aboard the aircraft carrier Midway and commanding the fleet during the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin incident, which led to an escalation of American involvement in Vietnam. The father of three children, Morrison had a falling out with Jim after his son launched his music career with the Doors in the mid-'60s.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | Associated Press
Rear Adm. John M. Poindexter, President Reagan's former national security adviser and a key figure in the Iran-Contra scandal, retired from the Navy last week after 29 years of military service, officials said Wednesday. Poindexter's retirement had originally been scheduled for Oct. 1 but was delayed for two months for unspecified personal reasons. Cmdr. Kendall Pease, a Navy spokesman, said the admiral had left a job at the Pentagon "and retired effective Dec. 1."
NEWS
September 29, 1989
Earl E. Stone, 93, a retired Navy rear admiral who as a Naval Academy midshipman was on board the battleship Ohio in 1915 when it and two other dreadnoughts became the first to sail through the recently opened Panama Canal. During World War II he became the first skipper of the battleship Wisconsin. In 1955 he came to California as commandant of the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey and stayed in that area after retiring in 1957.
NEWS
April 26, 1992
David Rubel, 74, a retired Navy rear admiral who as a young gunnery officer was awarded the Navy's top medal for shooting down 19 kamikazes targeting a naval destroyer during World War II. Rubel, who in 1941 was assigned to the destroyer Gridley at Pearl Harbor, served on several destroyers during the war. While a gunnery officer on the Arron Ward off Okinawa in 1945, then-Lt. Rubel was credited with shooting down 19 kamikazes out of an attack force of 24.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1993
Joseph W. Fowler, a retired Navy rear admiral whose nautical expertise ranged from World War II ships and submarines to the replica fleet at Disneyland, has died in Florida, it was learned over the weekend. A spokesman for Woodlawn Memorial Park and Funeral Home in Orlando said Fowler had died in that city on Dec. 3 at age 99.
NEWS
March 4, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
Vice Adm. John M. Poindexter, who resigned as President Reagan's national security adviser soon after the Iran- contra scandal began unfolding, will receive an automatic demotion today under a law requiring White House action for him to retain his three-star rank. As a two-star rear admiral, Poindexter will be assigned to the long-range planning staff of the chief of naval operations, a desk job in the Pentagon complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Retired Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer, who was known as the "Father of Aegis," the Navy's primary air-defense weapon system that revolutionized how the Navy performed air defense, has died. He was 83. Meyer, who managed the development and early building of the Aegis system and later had an Aegis-equipped destroyer named after him, died of heart failure Tuesday at a hospital in Washington, D.C., said his son James. Meyer had been director of engineering at the Naval Ship Missile Systems Engineering Station in Port Hueneme before he was recalled to Washington and reported to the Naval Ordnance Systems Command as Aegis Weapon System manager in 1970.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2008 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
George Morrison, 89, a retired Navy rear admiral and the father of the late rock icon Jim Morrison, died in a Coronado, Calif., hospital Nov. 17 after a fall. Once the youngest admiral in the Navy, Morrison had a long career that included serving as operations officer aboard the aircraft carrier Midway and commanding the fleet during the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin incident, which led to an escalation of American involvement in Vietnam. The father of three children, Morrison had a falling out with Jim after his son launched his music career with the Doors in the mid-'60s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2005 | Adam Bernstein, The Washington Post
Retired Navy Rear Adm. Norvell G. Ward, who served as chief of naval forces in the Vietnam War during a period of escalating U.S. involvement, died July 19 in a retirement community in Atlantic Beach, Fla. He was 92 and had congestive heart failure. Ward graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1935 and became a much-honored submariner during World War II.
NEWS
September 13, 2001
American Airlines Flight 77 was en route to Los Angeles from Washington's Dulles Airport when it crashed into the Pentagon. Ruben Ornedo Ruben Ornedo, 39, of Eagle Rock, was originally scheduled to leave next week. He was a satellite communications engineer for Boeing, and during a lull in an extended Washington business trip he seized the chance to rush home for a day or two and see his wife of three months, Sheila, who is pregnant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2000 | TONY LYSTRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At 12, Charles "Bert" Johnston Jr. wanted to fly. So in the summer of 1973, he joined the Navy and took to the seas, then eventually the air. Last week, Johnston, who heads the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, was officially promoted from captain to rear admiral, putting him in the echelon of the Navy's highest-ranking officials. Johnston, 51, stepped in line for the promotion when he became commander of the weapons division in January 1999.
NEWS
February 4, 2000
Frederick Burdett Warder, 95, a highly decorated Navy rear admiral credited with sinking at least six Japanese ships while commanding the submarine Seawolf during World War II. At a time when the crude submarines were not noted for torpedoes that fired with precision, Warder took charge of the Seawolf in 1939 and quickly became known as an "artist of submarining," Theodore Roscoe wrote in his book, "United States Submarine Operations in World War II."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2005 | Adam Bernstein, The Washington Post
Retired Navy Rear Adm. Norvell G. Ward, who served as chief of naval forces in the Vietnam War during a period of escalating U.S. involvement, died July 19 in a retirement community in Atlantic Beach, Fla. He was 92 and had congestive heart failure. Ward graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1935 and became a much-honored submariner during World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2000 | TONY LYSTRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At 12, Charles "Bert" Johnston Jr. wanted to fly. So in the summer of 1973, he joined the Navy and took to the seas, then eventually the air. Last week, Johnston, who heads the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, was officially promoted from captain to rear admiral, putting him in the echelon of the Navy's highest-ranking officials. Johnston, 51, stepped in line for the promotion when he became commander of the weapons division in January 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1996 | KENNETH R. WEISS
John V. Chenevey, commanding officer of the Point Mugu and China Lake Navy bases, was promoted to rear admiral Monday in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., a Navy spokesman said. Chenevey took command of the Naval Air Warfare Center, Weapons Division, in July, overseeing the Navy's missile-testing operations at Point Mugu and its sister base at China Lake, in the upper Mojave Desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1994
The current furor (Aug. 11) concerning a very expensive new headquarters for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) calls to mind the wise counsel of C. Northcote Parkinson in "Parkinson's Law." He notes that organizations flourish in shabby, far-flung, inefficient facilities when their function is important. By contrast, the creation of a single, perfectly planned, plush central facility is a certain signal that the organization is no longer needed, and at the point of collapse.
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