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Rear End Collisions

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1987
What your editorial fails to mention is that the rear-ender type of accident is the result of vehicles following too close and/or too fast. The addition of more taillights will do little to prevent accidents if drivers do not adhere to common-sense driving procedures. Unfortunately, the auto supply stores do not market such a product. ED KYSAR Reseda
ARTICLES BY DATE
AUTOS
September 27, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Subarus, Cadillacs and Volvos earned top marks in a first-of-its-kind crash test of models equipped with systems to help drivers avoid rear-end collisions. The tests, conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, rate so-called active safety systems that warn drivers of impending impact and, in some models, automatically hit the brakes. The systems rely on radar, cameras and lasers to measure the distance from other vehicles or fixed objects, and they're considered an early step toward self-driving vehicles.
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BUSINESS
September 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Head restraints in some minivans inadequately protect people against neck injuries in rear-end crashes, the insurance industry said Sunday. Earning poor overall ratings were seven models subjected to a simulated crash: versions of the 2004-06 model years of the Dodge Grand Caravan and its corporate twin, the Chrysler Town & Country; a version of the 2005-06 Toyota Sienna; and four General Motors Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2011 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Police Commission has voted to kill the city's controversial red-light camera program, rejecting claims that the system makes streets safer while costing the city nothing. Tuesday's vote means that the red-light cameras installed at 32 intersections throughout the city could stop operating within a few weeks unless the City Council takes the unusual step of stripping the Police Commission of its authority over the issue. The move places Los Angeles at the center of a national debate about the cameras.
MAGAZINE
September 13, 1992
I can't help but comment on Kathleen Moloney's "State of Mind" (Palm Latitudes, Aug. 2), about freeway phobias and how some people have resorted to masturbating in gridlock traffic. Gee, I thought all of those rear-end collisions were for the purpose of collecting insurance. Boy, was I wrong. JOHN R. ROBERTS Lone Pine, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1986
If Don Harper Mills (Letters, Nov. 6) finds that eye-level brake lights are blinding, I question his ability to deal with oncoming headlights. I suggest that he make an appointment with an ophthalmologist as soon as possible. Statistics have shown that cars, equipped with third brake lights, have approximately 50% less rear-end collisions than those not so equipped! Not only should they not be banned; they should be required equipment on all passenger cars. ANN HANSON North Hollywood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2011 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Police Commission has voted to kill the city's controversial red-light camera program, rejecting claims that the system makes streets safer while costing the city nothing. Tuesday's vote means that the red-light cameras installed at 32 intersections throughout the city could stop operating within a few weeks unless the City Council takes the unusual step of stripping the Police Commission of its authority over the issue. The move places Los Angeles at the center of a national debate about the cameras.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
A 21-year-old Santa Paula man was seriously injured Wednesday morning when he slammed his motorcycle into the rear bumper of a car that was slowing for a red light, authorities said. The crash occurred shortly before 7 a.m. at Santa Clara and Central avenues in an unincorporated area between Oxnard and Camarillo, said Officer Dave Webb of the California Highway Patrol.
NEWS
June 13, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Question: I have heard that the federal government is going to require auto manufacturers to install an additional brake light on the rear of all cars. After having been rear-ended recently, this sounds like a good idea. Can I install such a light on my car?--J.W. Answer: You are correct that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is going to require a high-mounted, rear brake light on all new cars sold in the United States after Sept. 1.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | MICHELLE MALTAIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day of our first rain this season, I had my first auto accident. The jolt to the car was significant, but even more so was the education I got. The Toyota Corolla I was driving, with my mother as passenger, was rammed by another Corolla. The impact mangled the rear of the car, pushing most of the metal into the trunk. Almost before the cars stopped rocking, people were pushing business cards for auto body shops through the car windows and offering to "help."
BUSINESS
June 26, 2010 | By Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
Toyota Motor Corp. has stopped all sales of its 2010 Lexus HS 250h hybrid after government tests showed it could leak fuel in a rear-end collision. The Japanese automaker said it was also recalling roughly 13,000 HS sedans that have already been sold and 4,000 that are still on dealership lots. A remedy for the problem has not yet been determined, Toyota spokesman Brian Lyons said. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in a recall filing Friday, said that the defect "could result in a fire."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2008 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
Two Anaheim police officers were taken to the hospital early Thursday after an allegedly drunk driver rear-ended their patrol car. The officers, one male and one female, were slowly driving west on Orangethorpe Avenue shortly after 2 a.m. when their vehicle was hit from behind by a pickup truck that appeared to be traveling much faster than the patrol car, said Anaheim Police Sgt. Rick Martinez. The truck rolled onto its side, and the patrol car was forced up into a driveway.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Head restraints in some minivans inadequately protect people against neck injuries in rear-end crashes, the insurance industry said Sunday. Earning poor overall ratings were seven models subjected to a simulated crash: versions of the 2004-06 model years of the Dodge Grand Caravan and its corporate twin, the Chrysler Town & Country; a version of the 2005-06 Toyota Sienna; and four General Motors Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two bus passengers and a motorist were injured Thursday when a car rear-ended an OCTA bus on Beach Boulevard near Stanton Avenue, police said. None of their names were released. The accident occurred about 2:15 p.m. after the bus had made a stop, said Lt. Steve Holliday, a spokesman for the Buena Park Police Department. The driver of the car was admitted to a hospital with serious injuries to her legs, Holliday said, while the bus passengers were treated and released.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Ford Motor Co. went on trial Monday to answer allegations that it made a police cruiser that exploded in high-speed rear-end collisions and misrepresented the vehicle as safe. Illinois police departments, suing as a group, claim that Ford's Crown Victoria Police Interceptor is vulnerable to fuel-fed fires after rear-end collisions because the gas tank is placed behind the rear axle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
A San Juan Capistrano man was killed early Friday when the pickup truck he was riding in rear-ended a crane truck on Interstate 5, officials said. Alfonso Gonzalez, 56, died at the scene. Driver Hector Gonzalez, 36, also of San Juan Capistrano, remains hospitalized. It was unclear if the two men were related. Neither was wearing a seat belt, police said. The pickup was northbound near Junipero Serra Road about 1:10 a.m. when, for an unknown reason, the collision occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two bus passengers and a motorist were injured Thursday when a car rear-ended an OCTA bus on Beach Boulevard near Stanton Avenue, police said. None of their names were released. The accident occurred about 2:15 p.m. after the bus had made a stop, said Lt. Steve Holliday, a spokesman for the Buena Park Police Department. The driver of the car was admitted to a hospital with serious injuries to her legs, Holliday said, while the bus passengers were treated and released.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | MICHELLE MALTAIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day of our first rain this season, I had my first auto accident. The jolt to the car was significant, but even more so was the education I got. The Toyota Corolla I was driving, with my mother as passenger, was rammed by another Corolla. The impact mangled the rear of the car, pushing most of the metal into the trunk. Almost before the cars stopped rocking, people were pushing business cards for auto body shops through the car windows and offering to "help."
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