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NEWS
December 28, 1986 | GARRY ABRAMS
View has revisited some of the people and places it reported on in 1986 to update their stories. Among them: --A shelter for the homeless that was itself homeless. --An author who had new ideas about how to market and promote his book. --The campaign to save Nancy Reagan's 1981 inaugural gown, which is stretching under the weight of its bugle beads.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a new report that excoriates the Metropolitan Transportation Authority for favoring rail projects over buses, a public-policy think tank contends the transit agency's 20-year plan for moving commuters in Los Angeles County is based on flawed assumptions, faulty data and inconsistent scenarios that underestimate the long-term cost of building and running trains. The report, coauthored by USC professor James E.
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NEWS
June 25, 1986 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Reason is coming to Los Angeles. Next week. But before you say, "And about time, too," perhaps you should know more. In this case, Reason is a magazine and part of the Reason Foundation, a think tank that seeks ways to turn the federal government into an anorexic shadow of its current self, among other things. And in what some might consider an act of insanity, the Reason staff is abandoning the quiet, clear-aired charms of Santa Barbara for the Southern California megalopolis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a new report that excoriates the Metropolitan Transportation Authority for favoring rail projects over buses, a think tank contends that the agency's 20-year plan for moving commuters is based on flawed assumptions, faulty data and inconsistent scenarios that underestimate the long-term cost of building and running trains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a new report that excoriates the Metropolitan Transportation Authority for favoring rail projects over buses, a public-policy think tank contends the transit agency's 20-year plan for moving commuters in Los Angeles County is based on flawed assumptions, faulty data and inconsistent scenarios that underestimate the long-term cost of building and running trains. The report, coauthored by USC professor James E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1993
In his Capitol Journal column (Dec. 14) Dan Morain erroneously states that the "(education) choice initiative had its genesis at the Reason Foundation." This statement is false on its face, and is highly misleading in its implications. The Reason Foundation conducted a series of educational seminars on a variety of school-choice issues during 1991, culminating in our annual banquet featuring Wisconsin Rep. Polly Williams, author of a pioneering voucher measure. At that dinner, we presented our annual "Free Minds and Free Markets" award to Joseph Alibrandi, to honor his many years of effort in the cause of educational reform.
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County supervisors don't know it yet, but they have reached a delicate consensus on about $1 billion in financial rescue plans proposed by creditors and consultants, an informal survey conducted by The Times shows. "Since we don't communicate a lot, (that) is very interesting," said Supervisor Jim Silva when told about the common ground he shares with his four colleagues.
OPINION
July 26, 1992
Regarding the Column Right commentary on July 13, I vehemently disagree with the opinion of Joel Fox of the Jarvis Taxpayers Assn. and the report from the right-wing think tank, the Reason Foundation. According to Fox, in order to acquire money to pay for more police officers it's OK to sacrifice public-works jobs. His attitude is that these employees are not deserving of a respectable job that affords a person a decent place to live, food on the table and some medical care. According to his laissez faire economics, to save money the city should exploit its most desperate workers to get cheap labor to replace present employees, with no regard to the consequences for hundreds of middle-class workers losing their income, when many are minorities who have no other opportunity but with the city to obtain a decent-paying job. WAYNE TURNER, Hawthorne
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1989
Once again the critics of privatization present a gratuitous and unbalanced picture of privatization. Their assertion that "public employment has been, and remains, a principal engine of minority economic progress," ignores the scholarship of black economist Thomas Sowell, author of "Ethnic America." Sowell found that those groups (e.g., the Irish in the l9th Century) who tended to rely on government employment for economic advancement entered the American mainstream at a much slower rate than did those groups that tended to seek economic advancement through the private sector (e.g.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1986
Harry Bernstein's Aug. 20 column, " 'Privatizing' Minibuses May Set a Dangerous Precedent," itself sets a dangerous precedent. Bernstein blithely ignores the multitude of scientific studies that almost conclusively demonstrate the superiority of the private sector in providing transit and other public services--both in terms of efficiency and lower costs. Economists have known for years that competition among private providers tends to lower the cost of service delivery so much that contractors can usually provide the services at considerably less cost than government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1995 | RENE LYNCH
A Libertarian think tank says bankrupt Orange County can raise at least $250 million by selling airport-development rights at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station and transferring operations at John Wayne Airport to the buyer. Opponents to such a move contend that federal aviation guidelines and legal challenges make the deal unlikely. But a new report by the Los Angeles-based Reason Foundation downplays those obstacles. "It looks like it's legally do-able," said foundation president Robert W.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, they have bowed to the hated T-word. First the bankers owed billions by bankrupt Orange County hinted that taxes would be an inevitable step toward recovery. Then conservative business leaders said new and increased fees must be considered. Later a handful of state politicians from both sides of the aisle joined the chorus, saying taxes cannot be ruled out.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now even the libertarians say a tax hike is inevitable. The Reason Foundation, a think tank that last month insisted Orange County could slash, sell and privatize its way out of financial disaster, announced Tuesday that it has switched positions and supports a short-term tax increase as a crucial part of a wide-ranging recovery plan. "You don't want to stand on principle to the point where you cut your own throat," said Bryan Snyder, senior vice president of the Los Angeles-based foundation.
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County supervisors don't know it yet, but they have reached a delicate consensus on about $1 billion in financial rescue plans proposed by creditors and consultants, an informal survey conducted by The Times shows. "Since we don't communicate a lot, (that) is very interesting," said Supervisor Jim Silva when told about the common ground he shares with his four colleagues.
NEWS
February 16, 1995 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A libertarian public policy foundation urged Orange County officials Wednesday to sell assets, privatize services and cut the county's work force by 10% to hasten the recovery from bankruptcy. The Los Angeles-based Reason Foundation also recommended slashing pay and benefits to remaining county employees by 10%, which foundation President Robert W. Poole Jr. said would help the county emerge from its financial debacle without a sales tax increase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1994 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Los Angeles could save at least $120 million a year by turning many government services over to private firms, but instead is falling out of step with a privatization trend that is sweeping the country, according to a report to be released today by a conservative think tank. The Reason Foundation study recommends that the city's trash collection, paramedic service, workers' compensation claims administration and golf course operations be turned over to private companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
The only novel idea that came out of the Los Angeles City Council's recent gloomy budget debate was Councilwoman Joy Picus' proposal to sell Los Angeles International Airport. I know selling LAX to some private airport management company may sound like a scheme hatched by Margaret Thatcher or the people who brought us deregulation of the savings and loan industry. But the city administrative office has estimated that the airport would be worth more than $2 billion if it were put up for sale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
I walked around the empty Santa Monica Freeway at La Cienega Boulevard Monday afternoon, taking a quiet look at the reconstruction job before the superhighway returned to its usual jammed, polluted state. Not that my relationship with this ugly concrete road has every been a sentimental one. The last time I'd approached that spot on foot was early in the morning, the day after the earthquake, just as the workers were arriving to begin the repair.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1971, Robert Poole penned a little-noticed article entitled "The Case for Education Vouchers," which appeared in an obscure libertarian magazine he ran out of his Santa Barbara garage. "The imperative is to break the state's educational monopoly," Poole wrote, "and the voucher plan is the only politically feasible way of doing this." Twenty-two years later, his view of public schools is still sour.
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