Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReasonable Doubt
IN THE NEWS

Reasonable Doubt

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
In the contrived and predictable yet fairly tense "Reasonable Doubt," Dominic Cooper ("The History Boys," "Mamma Mia") plays scrappy Chicago District Atty. Mitch Brockden, a rising star with a strong conviction record, a pretty wife (Erin Karpluk) and a newborn daughter. So, with much to lose, it's no great surprise (OK, in the real world it might be) when Mitch flees a fatal hit-and-run that occurs while he's driving drunk. Soon after, though, auto mechanic Clinton Davis (Samuel L. Jackson)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
In the contrived and predictable yet fairly tense "Reasonable Doubt," Dominic Cooper ("The History Boys," "Mamma Mia") plays scrappy Chicago District Atty. Mitch Brockden, a rising star with a strong conviction record, a pretty wife (Erin Karpluk) and a newborn daughter. So, with much to lose, it's no great surprise (OK, in the real world it might be) when Mitch flees a fatal hit-and-run that occurs while he's driving drunk. Soon after, though, auto mechanic Clinton Davis (Samuel L. Jackson)
Advertisement
NATIONAL
July 12, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
SANFORD, Fla.--The defense in the George Zimmerman murder trial made its closing arguments Friday morning, reminding the jurors that the state has the burden of proof of showing that the neighborhood watch volunteer committed murder when he shot Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager. Defense attorney Mark O'Mara began his last attempt to convince the jury of six women with an explanation of reasonable doubt and explained that a presumption of Zimmerman's innocence always exists. He also promised to show that Zimmerman acted in self-defense when he shot Martin during a confrontation in this Florida town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | Joseph Serna and Lee Romney
The man jailed in connection with the fatal stabbing of Dodgers fan Jonathan Denver after a confrontation triggered by team rivalry was released from custody late Friday, after the San Francisco district attorney said there was not enough evidence to charge him. Michael Montgomery, 21, of Lodi was booked into jail just before 5 p.m. Thursday, after San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr announced that he had made "implicating statements" during questioning....
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI
Jeffrey Archer's courtroom drama "Beyond a Reasonable Doubt" isn't a great play, with its heavy-handed scripting and obvious motivations, but this production at the Long Beach Playhouse's Studio Theatre sparkles so brightly in the second half, with the winning performances of Jack Messenger and Vickers Wilson, that you don't really care. Noted attorney Sir David Metcalfe (Messenger) has been accused of murdering his terminally ill wife (Wilson).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1998 | JERRY HICKS
It's the kind of story that immediately outrages many of those who think we already coddle the criminals. A trucker sleeping inside the cab of his rig is approached by three men he fears are about to rob him. He chases them across a parking lot with a rifle and opens fire to defend his property. But instead of being the hero, he finds himself arrested for his efforts. In fact, he's facing even more serious charges than the three men he says were after his cargo of frozen seafood.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | Robert Abele; Gary Goldstein; Kevin Thomas
The production notes for this remake of Fritz Lang's 1956 thriller "Beyond a Reasonable Doubt" -- about the pickle a reporter gets in when he frames himself for murder to expose an evidence-tampering DA -- describe writer-director Peter Hyams' movie with the demographic-hopeful label "youthful noir." (Doesn't it sound like a hair color?) That's because middle-aged Dana Andrews and Joan Fontaine are now cocky pretty boy Jesse Metcalfe (updated to be the on-air type of reporter), and teenage-forever Amber Tamblyn as his skeptical-then-supportive love interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1995 | Whatever drama occurs in the courtroom in the coming days, jurors deciding the fate of O.J. Simpson must return to considering whether the prosecution's evidence proves "beyond a reasonable doubt" his guilt or innocence in the slayings of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman last June. Here's how several Southern Californians defined the term to TRIN YARBOROUGH.
RUTH GRABOWSKI Registered nurse, former juror, Long Beach For me to clear up my doubts about a case, I'd depend heavily on concrete, provable evidence. I'd hesitate to believe other people's testimony. Over the years, I've been wrong so often when judging people and situations that I've come to have a lot less faith in my perceptions and to realize that my reactions are often tainted.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1990 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Beyond Reasonable Doubt," which marked the playwrighting debut of British novelist Jeffrey Archer, had its U.S. premiere over the weekend in a Laguna Playhouse production at the Moulton Theatre. And it's a potboiler. Should there have been any doubt? Probably not. Archer's huge output of best-selling sagas--"Kane and Abel," "The Prodigal Daughter" and the rest--has never been prized for literary quality.
NEWS
February 11, 1997 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
O.J. Simpson must have been left reeling by the $33.5-million verdict levied against him by a Santa Monica jury, but if he listened closely to some of the six men and six women who sat in judgment, he might have breathed a sigh of relief. If this group had been judging him the first time around, when he was on trial for murder, Simpson might be facing life behind bars.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2013 | By John M. Glionna and Carolyn Cole
SANFORD, Fla. - Not guilty. The jury verdict ended a case that has gripped America for weeks, sending a clamor of outrage through those who were convinced that George Zimmerman committed murder when he shot unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin in a confrontation at a gated community in Florida. For others, there were proclamations that justice had been done. The prosecution, they said, never proved that the 29-year-old neighborhood watch volunteer set out to kill Martin that night in February 2012.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2013 | By Devin Kelly and Robert Faturechi
As expected, social media erupted Saturday night when  George Zimmerman was found not guilty on Saturday of all charges in the shooting of Trayvon Martin.  The reactions that poured in from around the country ranged from agreement with the verdict to outrage. A number of Twitter users also expressed sympathy for Martin's family.  The entire trial was widely discussed and tracked on social media. Thousands tweeted and posted on Facebook with hashtags such as #Zimmerman and #StandWithTrayvon.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
SANFORD, Fla.--The defense in the George Zimmerman murder trial made its closing arguments Friday morning, reminding the jurors that the state has the burden of proof of showing that the neighborhood watch volunteer committed murder when he shot Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager. Defense attorney Mark O'Mara began his last attempt to convince the jury of six women with an explanation of reasonable doubt and explained that a presumption of Zimmerman's innocence always exists. He also promised to show that Zimmerman acted in self-defense when he shot Martin during a confrontation in this Florida town.
OPINION
July 25, 2012
As Americans speculate about why a young man in Colorado allegedly engaged in a nightmarish shooting rampage in a movie theater, lawyers for a convicted killer in Idaho are asking the Supreme Court to rule that states must allow defendants to plead not guilty by reason of insanity. The court should do so. James Holmes, the 24-year-old former graduate student accused of killing 12 people and injuring 58 during a midnight showing of "The Dark Knight Rises," could face the death penalty if convicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2012 | By Adolfo Flores and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Prosecutors on Friday declined to file murder charges against former Tournament of Roses official Richard Allen Munnecke, finding that DNA evidence presented by sheriff's detectives was insufficient to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. The decision came two days after Munnecke, 71, was arrested at his Alhambra home in connection with the 2004 death of Donna Lee Kelly, a Buick saleswoman and a longtime Tournament of Roses volunteer. The abrupt change in course left Pasadena's tournament community trying to process the news after an already surprising couple of days.
SPORTS
February 7, 2012 | By Mike Bresnahan
Reporting from Boston — The Lakers' margin for error is credit-card slim, their lack of depth and talent costing them if they don't play a nearly perfect game. In fact, you can hear all about it if you listen closely. "It just seems like our margin for error is really, really small right now," Derek Fisher said after the Lakers lost a seven-point lead Monday in the last 41/2 minutes of a 95-90 loss to Philadelphia. Said Kobe Bryant : "Our margin for error is just not as big as some of the other teams.
BOOKS
July 7, 1996 | Erwin Chemerinsky, Erwin Chemerinsky is a law professor at USC
Opinion polls continue to show that most Americans disagree with the jury that acquitted O.J. Simpson. But not Alan Dershowitz. A Harvard law professor and a member of the Simpson defense team, he argues that there was indeed enough reasonable doubt to warrant a verdict of not guilty. Why, then, do so many people question the verdict? Dershowitz offers several explanations. First, he says, many Americans don't understand the rigorous demands of the "proof beyond a reasonable doubt" standard.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2011 | By Geraldine Baum and Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
New York prosecutors filed a motion to drop all charges against Dominique Strauss-Kahn, abruptly ending the sensational criminal case in which a housekeeper accused the powerful Frenchman of trying to rape her in a hotel suite, only to see her credibility damaged after she lied repeatedly to investigators. But clear-cut vindication eluded all the parties involved in the tawdry, he-said-she-said case, which made headlines around the globe. To their embarrassment, prosecutors were forced to acknowledge that a case they initially said was "very strong" dissolved after they lost confidence in the accuser, Nafissatou Diallo, a 32-year-old native of Guinea, in West Africa.
SPORTS
April 20, 2010 | Helene Elliott
The Kings did more Monday than ride a ferocious power play to their first home playoff victory in eight years and seize a 2-1 series lead over the Canucks entering Game 4 on Wednesday night at Staples Center. When they overpowered Vancouver, they also graduated as a team from "hope" to "think" and put "know" firmly in their sights. And if you're not familiar with General Manager Dean Lombardi's team-building philosophy, here's the translation. Lombardi's theory says athletes and teams start out by hoping they can win. As they enjoy small successes they begin to think they can win. When those small successes become significant and sustained, they approach each game knowing they can win. The Kings have progressed to the stage of thinking they can win. Based on their performance against the third-seeded Canucks, there is no reason to doubt them.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|