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HOME & GARDEN
October 20, 2005
RE "Worry About Dog, Not Fence" [Oct. 6]: I suggest a much simpler and less expensive solution to keep a dog from digging his way out under a fence. Instead of installing concrete blocks to a depth of at least a couple of feet, use 1/2 -inch- or 3/4 -inch-diameter rebar along the fence, pounded into the ground vertically at 6-foot spacing. Rebar can be purchased at any home center in 24-inch lengths and is relatively inexpensive. The homeowner or a handyman can do this. It is a tedious process but is very effective and economical.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
January 22, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo
In the smoke and dust along Rue La Saline, at the edge of a rubble-strewn dump, a little man with missing front teeth hammered away at a shattered pillar of concrete. Jean Robert Lemer, 45, had been laboring for hours to extract a piece of the steel rebar that ran through it. But he wasn't making much progress. If he had a hacksaw, he could cut off the exposed metal. But he had only a little household hammer. The sun was taking a toll, searing through a pall of white concrete dust and the black smoke of smoldering trash.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Engineers are investigating whether thin concrete, irregularly spaced steel bars and over-tightened reinforcing cables caused extensive damage to a new $12-million carpool bridge connecting the San Diego and Costa Mesa freeways, newly obtained Caltrans records show.
WORLD
January 21, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo
In the smoke and dust along Rue La Saline, at the edge of a rubble-strewn dump, a little man with missing front teeth hammered away at a shattered pillar of concrete. Jean Robert Lemer, 45, had been laboring for hours to extract a piece of the iron rebar that ran through it. But he wasn't making much progress. If he had a hacksaw, he could cut off the exposed metal. But he only had a little household hammer. The sun was taking a toll, searing through a pall of white cement dust and the black smoke of smoldering trash.
HOME & GARDEN
October 20, 2005
RE "Twisted Sense of Order" [Sept. 22]: Fanciful tuteurs are surely an inspiration for expressive gardeners! Surprisingly, tuteurs resemble the Watts Towers in their materials and method of construction. Italian immigrant Sabato (Simon) Rodia bent thousands of rebars and wired them together to create the amazing geometry of Nuestro Pueblo. Now known as the Watts Towers, they appear to have a welded inner armature but they do not. They are wired, like a tuteur. Rodia, using heavier rebar than the 3/8 -inch kind in the story, bent the steel rods with his body power, assisted by nearby Red Car tracks.
OPINION
November 24, 2002
Re "Few Bumps Found on Caltrans' Path," Nov. 17: It is not surprising that Caltrans gets relatively high marks for recent construction projects. Infrastructure projects, particularly concrete structures, tend to show their defects many years -- or even decades -- after they are built. Once the concrete is stripped, it is most often "spalling" of concrete (flakes or chunks of concrete falling off the surface) that indicates that rebar was placed too close to the inside of the form.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2000
Re "Another Defect in Interchange Bridges Found," Jan. 14: Could it be a coincidence that Caltrans has spent $4 billion over the last four years to retrofit bridges for earthquakes but hired "just one overworked inspector [to] sift over hundreds of thousands of X-rays of critical welded joints"? Given the number of defective rebar welds discovered in California's bridges, it is obvious that the job of Caltrans to supervise the construction companies that profit enormously from freeway seismic retrofit has not been done.
WORLD
January 22, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo
In the smoke and dust along Rue La Saline, at the edge of a rubble-strewn dump, a little man with missing front teeth hammered away at a shattered pillar of concrete. Jean Robert Lemer, 45, had been laboring for hours to extract a piece of the steel rebar that ran through it. But he wasn't making much progress. If he had a hacksaw, he could cut off the exposed metal. But he had only a little household hammer. The sun was taking a toll, searing through a pall of white concrete dust and the black smoke of smoldering trash.
WORLD
January 21, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo
In the smoke and dust along Rue La Saline, at the edge of a rubble-strewn dump, a little man with missing front teeth hammered away at a shattered pillar of concrete. Jean Robert Lemer, 45, had been laboring for hours to extract a piece of the iron rebar that ran through it. But he wasn't making much progress. If he had a hacksaw, he could cut off the exposed metal. But he only had a little household hammer. The sun was taking a toll, searing through a pall of white cement dust and the black smoke of smoldering trash.
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Wednesdays are KROQ nights at Rebar, a Woodland Hills dance club that attracts a large crowd with nothing but fun on the agenda. By 10:30 p.m., there's a half-hour wait to get in the door--so get there early. The club, open from 9 p.m. to 1:45 a.m., has a $5 cover. THE SCENE: The club packs a lot into a little, so dancers should expect to bump shoulders once in a while on the tiny dance floor. Bottles of domestic beer are sold in a corner at a slightly lower price than at the one large bar.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2007 | Lynn Marshall, Times Staff Writer
Leif Erikson stood his ground in Seattle's Shilshole Bay Marina, just as he had since 1962 -- despite his appointment with makeover artists in Kent, 15 miles to the south, and the efforts of a crew working full time to dislodge the 17-foot bronze Viking. Workers tried concrete drills and jackhammers, and even tried to lever him out with a crane wielding 20,000 pounds of force. About 20 people attended his departure ceremony Tuesday -- but Leif remained in place.
HOME & GARDEN
October 20, 2005
RE "Worry About Dog, Not Fence" [Oct. 6]: I suggest a much simpler and less expensive solution to keep a dog from digging his way out under a fence. Instead of installing concrete blocks to a depth of at least a couple of feet, use 1/2 -inch- or 3/4 -inch-diameter rebar along the fence, pounded into the ground vertically at 6-foot spacing. Rebar can be purchased at any home center in 24-inch lengths and is relatively inexpensive. The homeowner or a handyman can do this. It is a tedious process but is very effective and economical.
HOME & GARDEN
October 20, 2005
RE "Twisted Sense of Order" [Sept. 22]: Fanciful tuteurs are surely an inspiration for expressive gardeners! Surprisingly, tuteurs resemble the Watts Towers in their materials and method of construction. Italian immigrant Sabato (Simon) Rodia bent thousands of rebars and wired them together to create the amazing geometry of Nuestro Pueblo. Now known as the Watts Towers, they appear to have a welded inner armature but they do not. They are wired, like a tuteur. Rodia, using heavier rebar than the 3/8 -inch kind in the story, bent the steel rods with his body power, assisted by nearby Red Car tracks.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2003 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Rebar is just a lowly scrap metal, but it's starting to look like gold on some construction sites. The steel reinforcing rods used in building everything from skyscrapers to freeway sound walls are in short supply on the West Coast. That has led to sporadic delays at building projects around California, including renovation work at the Hollywood Bowl and construction of a new engineering hall at USC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Engineers are investigating whether thin concrete, irregularly spaced steel bars and over-tightened reinforcing cables caused extensive damage to a new $12-million carpool bridge connecting the San Diego and Costa Mesa freeways, newly obtained Caltrans records show.
OPINION
November 24, 2002
Re "Few Bumps Found on Caltrans' Path," Nov. 17: It is not surprising that Caltrans gets relatively high marks for recent construction projects. Infrastructure projects, particularly concrete structures, tend to show their defects many years -- or even decades -- after they are built. Once the concrete is stripped, it is most often "spalling" of concrete (flakes or chunks of concrete falling off the surface) that indicates that rebar was placed too close to the inside of the form.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2003 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Rebar is just a lowly scrap metal, but it's starting to look like gold on some construction sites. The steel reinforcing rods used in building everything from skyscrapers to freeway sound walls are in short supply on the West Coast. That has led to sporadic delays at building projects around California, including renovation work at the Hollywood Bowl and construction of a new engineering hall at USC.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2007 | Lynn Marshall, Times Staff Writer
Leif Erikson stood his ground in Seattle's Shilshole Bay Marina, just as he had since 1962 -- despite his appointment with makeover artists in Kent, 15 miles to the south, and the efforts of a crew working full time to dislodge the 17-foot bronze Viking. Workers tried concrete drills and jackhammers, and even tried to lever him out with a crane wielding 20,000 pounds of force. About 20 people attended his departure ceremony Tuesday -- but Leif remained in place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2001 | DAREN BRISCOE and JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The roof of a giant sewage tank under construction in Carson collapsed Thursday, plunging 11 workers 50 feet into a jumble of wet concrete, buckled scaffolding and steel rods that impaled two of them. After a delicate rescue effort that lasted more than two hours, the men were taken to hospitals. One of the two pierced by metal rebar remained in critical condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2000
Re "Another Defect in Interchange Bridges Found," Jan. 14: Could it be a coincidence that Caltrans has spent $4 billion over the last four years to retrofit bridges for earthquakes but hired "just one overworked inspector [to] sift over hundreds of thousands of X-rays of critical welded joints"? Given the number of defective rebar welds discovered in California's bridges, it is obvious that the job of Caltrans to supervise the construction companies that profit enormously from freeway seismic retrofit has not been done.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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