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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2001
The Los Angeles City Council unanimously agreed Tuesday to appoint Rebecca Avila to fill a vacancy on the Los Angeles Police Commission. Avila, the former executive director of the city's Ethics Commission, will carry out the remaining three months of Gerald Chaleff's term. Chaleff, who had headed the commission since 1999, was fired by Mayor Richard Riordan last month after the mayor said he wanted a change in leadership.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2001
The Los Angeles City Council unanimously agreed Tuesday to appoint Rebecca Avila to fill a vacancy on the Los Angeles Police Commission. Avila, the former executive director of the city's Ethics Commission, will carry out the remaining three months of Gerald Chaleff's term. Chaleff, who had headed the commission since 1999, was fired by Mayor Richard Riordan last month after the mayor said he wanted a change in leadership.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2001 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Avila, a former executive director of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission, is a leading candidate to fill a vacancy on the city's Police Commission, Mayor Richard Riordan acknowledged Saturday. Riordan has been looking for a new police commissioner since his controversial firing of commission President Gerald Chaleff on Feb. 5. The mayor has scheduled a news conference Monday morning to announce his choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2001 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan confirmed at a news conference Monday his appointment of Rebecca Avila to the Los Angeles Police Commission. Avila, a former director of the city Ethics Commission, will fill the opening created when Riordan fired commission President Gerald Chaleff. Avila's term is likely to be a short one: Although the next mayor, who will take office July 1, could keep any or all of the commissioners, he or she is expected to replace them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2001 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan confirmed at a news conference Monday his appointment of Rebecca Avila to the Los Angeles Police Commission. Avila, a former director of the city Ethics Commission, will fill the opening created when Riordan fired commission President Gerald Chaleff. Avila's term is likely to be a short one: Although the next mayor, who will take office July 1, could keep any or all of the commissioners, he or she is expected to replace them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly six months after the Los Angeles City Ethics Commission ousted its founding director, commissioners on Thursday tapped the watchdog agency's longtime second-in-command as its new chief, choosing a path of continuity rather than change. In selecting Rebecca Avila as executive director, commission President Raquelle de la Rocha said, the agency found a leader with "practical wisdom, solid judgment and a commitment to maintaining integrity in the city's political process."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Friday picked its highest-ranking deputy to lead the city's anti-corruption agency while seeking a permanent replacement for Benjamin Bycel, the founding executive director fired last month. Deputy Director Rebecca Avila, 34, was the unanimous choice of commissioners during a closed-door session that also included discussion of "anticipated litigation" over Bycel's abrupt and controversial dismissal on Oct. 20.
OPINION
April 14, 1996
When Ben Bycel was unceremoniously dismissed as executive director of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission last year, reform-minded Angelenos had every reason to wonder whether the agency they created to keep city government clean would lose its reputation for independence--a quality that Bycel had abundantly displayed. Well, with the permanent assignment of interim executive director Rebecca Avila, the skeptics among us can breathe easier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1996
The Los Angeles Ethics Commission decided Thursday that an ordinance for monitoring gifts to the city is unnecessary, despite Councilwoman Ruth Galanter's beliefs to the contrary. Rebecca Avila, acting head of the five-member commission, said she and her colleagues believed that such an ordinance might stifle giving, including donated time. "We need more volunteers," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2000
The executive director of the City Ethics Commission has announced she will leave her post to take a job with the Annenberg School of Communications at USC. Rebecca Avila, who championed the commission's effort to disclose campaign finance reportson the Internet, is set to take her new post in October. Meanwhile, Deputy Director LeeAnn Pelham will serve as the agency's interim executive director while a nationwide search is conducted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2001 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Avila, a former executive director of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission, is a leading candidate to fill a vacancy on the city's Police Commission, Mayor Richard Riordan acknowledged Saturday. Riordan has been looking for a new police commissioner since his controversial firing of commission President Gerald Chaleff on Feb. 5. The mayor has scheduled a news conference Monday morning to announce his choice.
OPINION
April 14, 1996
When Ben Bycel was unceremoniously dismissed as executive director of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission last year, reform-minded Angelenos had every reason to wonder whether the agency they created to keep city government clean would lose its reputation for independence--a quality that Bycel had abundantly displayed. Well, with the permanent assignment of interim executive director Rebecca Avila, the skeptics among us can breathe easier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly six months after the Los Angeles City Ethics Commission ousted its founding director, commissioners on Thursday tapped the watchdog agency's longtime second-in-command as its new chief, choosing a path of continuity rather than change. In selecting Rebecca Avila as executive director, commission President Raquelle de la Rocha said, the agency found a leader with "practical wisdom, solid judgment and a commitment to maintaining integrity in the city's political process."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Friday picked its highest-ranking deputy to lead the city's anti-corruption agency while seeking a permanent replacement for Benjamin Bycel, the founding executive director fired last month. Deputy Director Rebecca Avila, 34, was the unanimous choice of commissioners during a closed-door session that also included discussion of "anticipated litigation" over Bycel's abrupt and controversial dismissal on Oct. 20.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1996
State Sen. Tom Hayden, a probable challenger to Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan's reelection bid next spring, on Wednesday asked the city Ethics Commission to look into Riordan's relationship with a prominent architectural firm hired for City Hall earthquake reinforcement work. Late last week, Riordan acknowledged that he may have erred in acting on amendments to a contract with A. C. Martin and Associates, a tenant in a downtown building partly owned by the mayor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1996
Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn has approved a pay increase for a deputy who hosted a fund-raiser last month for Hahn's reelection bid. Deputy City Atty. Ted Smith was among 181 lawyers who were promoted or had their salaries raised. He received a double merit-pay increase worth $5,000 to make his total annual salary nearly $83,000.
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