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March 14, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rebecca Parris has a problem a lot like that of John McCain. She's a New England favorite who hasn't quite been able to develop a national constituency. And that's unfortunate, since the veteran (she is 48) singer has quietly evolved into a highly skilled jazz artist. Working at Steamers Cafe in Fullerton on Sunday night, Parris sang a set of familiar standards with the confident musicality of a performer with both the talent and the imagination to fully express her ideas.
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March 16, 2008 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
Marian McPartland, 89, has just finished playing the standard "These Foolish Things," so jazz singer Rebecca Parris serves her a compliment. "Marian, you made me cry," she says. "From your second eight, I had tears in my eyes. " "As long as it wasn't holding your nose," McPartland says back from the wheelchair behind her piano. "No, I was not," Parris says. "It was beautiful, darling. " They do the same verbal dance minutes later, when McPartland asks the Boston-based singer if they might do a number together, "if you think you have enough faith.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Listen to just a few songs from Rebecca Parris' album "Spring," and its underlying themes of physical and emotional intimacy are immediately apparent. You might even say the recording oozes with sexuality. "There's an undeniable physical aspect to our lives, an intimate side," Parris said in a phone conversation from Phoenix, where she's visiting friends and family during a break from a mini-tour of the West Coast. "And of course that comes out in my music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rebecca Parris has a problem a lot like that of John McCain. She's a New England favorite who hasn't quite been able to develop a national constituency. And that's unfortunate, since the veteran (she is 48) singer has quietly evolved into a highly skilled jazz artist. Working at Steamers Cafe in Fullerton on Sunday night, Parris sang a set of familiar standards with the confident musicality of a performer with both the talent and the imagination to fully express her ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Rebecca Parris, the Boston-based singer, is in town for a while. Heard during a one-night stand Thursday at Nucleus Nuance, she was set for two evenings at Alfonse's, closing tonight and will open Tuesday for a five-day run at the Director's Lounge of the Registry Hotel in Universal City. A tall, imposing woman, Parris can claim several of the virtues to which many singers aspire: a personal, confident sound, flawless intonation and an often dominant jazz feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE
***, Rebecca Parris, "Spring" MusicMasters There's a strong romantic feel and a bit of pop-music appeal to singer Rebecca Parris' "Spring." Accessible melodies and the familiar sway of Brazilian rhythms combine to draw the listener in; Parris' extremely inviting tones--warm and just a bit husky--complete the seduction.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2008 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
Marian McPartland, 89, has just finished playing the standard "These Foolish Things," so jazz singer Rebecca Parris serves her a compliment. "Marian, you made me cry," she says. "From your second eight, I had tears in my eyes. " "As long as it wasn't holding your nose," McPartland says back from the wheelchair behind her piano. "No, I was not," Parris says. "It was beautiful, darling. " They do the same verbal dance minutes later, when McPartland asks the Boston-based singer if they might do a number together, "if you think you have enough faith.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Being a jazz singer these days isn't easy, even for one as celebrated in her craft as is Rebecca Parris. Her infrequent recordings, notably the 1993 "Spring" from MusicMasters Jazz and her 1994 collaboration with vibraphonist Gary Burton for GRP, "It's Another Day," have received rave reviews. She has been championed by such established jazz stars as Burton and singing great Shirley Horn.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999
Pop/Rock * Mystery Train and Dick Smiley play at the Galaxy Concert Theatre, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana. 8 tonight. $8-$10. (714) 957-0600. * Chris Isaak plays at the Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano. 8 tonight. $65-$67. Also Saturday. (949) 496-8930. * The Derek Bordeaux Group plays at the Salt Creek Grille, 32802 Pacific Coast Highway, Dana Point. 8:30 tonight. Free. (949) 661-2447.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2000
Movies Richard Gere plays a Dallas gynecologist in Robert Altman's "Dr. T. and the Women." The women of the title include Helen Hunt, Laura Dern, Farrah Fawcett, Kate Hudson, Tara Reid, Liv Tyler, Shelley Long, Janine Tayler and Lee Grant. Among the men is Andy Richter. Opens Friday. * Also: Tim Meadows stars as "The Ladies Man"--a slick woman-chaser who dispenses advice to the lovelorn on his late-night radio show.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Being a jazz singer these days isn't easy, even for one as celebrated in her craft as is Rebecca Parris. Her infrequent recordings, notably the 1993 "Spring" from MusicMasters Jazz and her 1994 collaboration with vibraphonist Gary Burton for GRP, "It's Another Day," have received rave reviews. She has been championed by such established jazz stars as Burton and singing great Shirley Horn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Listen to just a few songs from Rebecca Parris' album "Spring," and its underlying themes of physical and emotional intimacy are immediately apparent. You might even say the recording oozes with sexuality. "There's an undeniable physical aspect to our lives, an intimate side," Parris said in a phone conversation from Phoenix, where she's visiting friends and family during a break from a mini-tour of the West Coast. "And of course that comes out in my music.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE
***, Rebecca Parris, "Spring" MusicMasters There's a strong romantic feel and a bit of pop-music appeal to singer Rebecca Parris' "Spring." Accessible melodies and the familiar sway of Brazilian rhythms combine to draw the listener in; Parris' extremely inviting tones--warm and just a bit husky--complete the seduction.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Rebecca Parris, the Boston-based singer, is in town for a while. Heard during a one-night stand Thursday at Nucleus Nuance, she was set for two evenings at Alfonse's, closing tonight and will open Tuesday for a five-day run at the Director's Lounge of the Registry Hotel in Universal City. A tall, imposing woman, Parris can claim several of the virtues to which many singers aspire: a personal, confident sound, flawless intonation and an often dominant jazz feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yusef Lateef, that grand master of the tenor saxophone, flute, oboe and other interesting woodwind instruments, makes his first Los Angeles appearance in three years on June 16 and 17 at the Jazz Bakery in Culver City when he joins drummer-composer Adam Rudolph for a premiere of "The World at Peace." The work, co-written by Lateef and Rudolph, will be performed by a band of 12 musicians, among them saxophonist Ralph Jones, bassist Eric Von Essen and violinist Jeff Gauthier.
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