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Rebecca Pidgeon

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
"I always had an acting bug," Clara Mamet declared recently during a rehearsal break at the Ruskin Group Theatre in Santa Monica. The confession wasn't exactly startling, coming from the newest member of a growing family dynasty of writer-performers. Clara Mamet, the daughter of actress Rebecca Pidgeon and author David Mamet, grew up reading a play a day and watching her parents shuttle between stages and film sets. One of her half-siblings, Zosia Mamet, also is an actress, portraying Joyce Ramsay on "Mad Men"and the nerdy Shoshanna on "Girls,"HBO's new outer-borough retort to "Sex and the City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
"I always had an acting bug," Clara Mamet declared recently during a rehearsal break at the Ruskin Group Theatre in Santa Monica. The confession wasn't exactly startling, coming from the newest member of a growing family dynasty of writer-performers. Clara Mamet, the daughter of actress Rebecca Pidgeon and author David Mamet, grew up reading a play a day and watching her parents shuttle between stages and film sets. One of her half-siblings, Zosia Mamet, also is an actress, portraying Joyce Ramsay on "Mad Men"and the nerdy Shoshanna on "Girls,"HBO's new outer-borough retort to "Sex and the City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1999 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He calls her Becks and she calls him Dave. He rises politely when she comes to the table and, during a lull in the conversation, looks over and remarks, "You look lovely this morning, dear." She smiles at him demurely. "Thank you," she replies. Their conversation is often in that kind of code married people develop. At one point he comments on one of her observations by saying, "Golly gumdrops."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1999 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He calls her Becks and she calls him Dave. He rises politely when she comes to the table and, during a lull in the conversation, looks over and remarks, "You look lovely this morning, dear." She smiles at him demurely. "Thank you," she replies. Their conversation is often in that kind of code married people develop. At one point he comments on one of her observations by saying, "Golly gumdrops."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
David Mamet's hit Broadway play "Speed-the-Plow" has opened in London to mixed reviews for the play itself and for the actress in the role created by Madonna. The London production stars Colin Stinton and Alfred Molina as fellow movie producers and longtime friends, and Rebecca Pidgeon as the temporary secretary who momentarily throws their friendship into question. On Broadway, Joe Mantegna and Ron Silver starred with Madonna. The acerbic comedy ended its Broadway run on New Year's Eve.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Mamet's "Heist" is the thinking person's caper flick, with its endlessly clever plotting revealing character under the utmost pressure. Mamet explores the limits of trust and loyalty and also the limits of strength and ability in the face of advancing age, and he does so with dark wit and humor while moving like lightning. Full of action and suspense, "Heist" is above all a gratifyingly adult entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2000 | Kevin Crust
RUN FRANKA RUN Following in the long tradition of European stars such as Greta Garbo, Sophia Loren and Juliette Binoche, German actress Franka Potente, who sprinted to art-house fame last year in "Run Lola Run," has crossed over and will star opposite Matt Damon in Universal's "The Bourne Identity." "Lola," with a North American gross of more than $7 million, was one of the top-grossing foreign-language films last year and earned Potente a shot at Hollywood stardom.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
David Mamet has raised profanity to an art form in many of his plays, but don't think his tastes are profane. Mamet did the adaptation of Chekov's "Uncle Vanya" that ended up as "Vanya on 42nd Street," and, says his wife, actress Rebecca Pidgeon, he's fond of playing Victorian songs on the piano. So there.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1998
MOVIES Directed by "Map of the Human Heart's" Vincent Ward, "What Dreams May Come" stars Robin Williams (right), Cuba Gooding Jr., Annabella Sciorra and Max Von Sydow in a tale of a love so powerful that it defies the bounds of heaven and earth. The film opens Friday in general release. MOVIES "Antz," DreamWorks' first animated film, is the tale of a revolution in an ant colony that becomes a celebration of individuality in the face of overwhelming conformity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
It has long been evident that American actors can be as good or better at doing the classics than British ones. But it has just as long been evident that there is little joy or profit in that contest. With tonight's "Great Performances" presentation of an Anglo-American "Uncle Vanya" (9-11 p.m. on Channels 15 and 24, 9:30-midnight on Channel 28), we can take solace in the seamless use made of good acting that hails from both sides of the Atlantic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Gielgud stands like a mannequin throughout most of his final screen appearance, in Samuel Beckett's "Catastrophe." He's playing an actor who's putty in the hands of a dictatorial stage director, portrayed by Harold Pinter. With David Mamet as the director of the six-minute "Catastrophe," it's hard to recall a film of this length that had more star names affiliated with it. The six other films in "Stage on Screen: Beckett on Film," Sunday on KCET and KVCR, are also shorts.
NEWS
October 3, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most enjoyable part of the DVD of the Rock's sword-and-sandal epic "The Scorpion King" (Universal, $20) is its animal outtakes. Although the Rock and his white camel seem to have a strong bond on screen, off screen the dromedary was a bit persnickety. There are several funny scenes in which the camel throws off the Rock and co-star Kelly Hu and stubbornly refuses to obey his trainer.
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