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Rebecca Schull

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NEWS
November 28, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Schull has become an idol to flight attendants, thanks to her role as the relentlessly perky ex-airline attendant Fay Evelyn Cochran on NBC's hit comedy "Wings." "Whenever I fly, a stewardess will come up to me and recognize me as if I were their long-lost buddy," Schull says. "One woman said to me one day: 'Oh, we love you. We feel like you are our spokeswoman.' They have a real affection for the show."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas
Writer-director Jeff Lipsky's "Twelve Thirty" is an ambitious ensemble piece in which every actor is able to shine and every character is a master of the well-turned phrase. It is a film that gradually draws the viewer into its thrall and builds to an unpredictable but effective climax. Two former high school classmates, Jeff (Jonathan Groff) and Mel (Portia Reiners), find themselves working at the same restaurant. Jeff is a shy, awkward rich kid with a crush on the sensuous, confident Mel; he gradually becomes entangled with her family, falling into a nest of expert manipulators.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas
Writer-director Jeff Lipsky's "Twelve Thirty" is an ambitious ensemble piece in which every actor is able to shine and every character is a master of the well-turned phrase. It is a film that gradually draws the viewer into its thrall and builds to an unpredictable but effective climax. Two former high school classmates, Jeff (Jonathan Groff) and Mel (Portia Reiners), find themselves working at the same restaurant. Jeff is a shy, awkward rich kid with a crush on the sensuous, confident Mel; he gradually becomes entangled with her family, falling into a nest of expert manipulators.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Schull has become an idol to flight attendants, thanks to her role as the relentlessly perky ex-airline attendant Fay Evelyn Cochran on NBC's hit comedy "Wings." "Whenever I fly, a stewardess will come up to me and recognize me as if I were their long-lost buddy," Schull says. "One woman said to me one day: 'Oh, we love you. We feel like you are our spokeswoman.' They have a real affection for the show."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Welcome to the Gulag. During her 1937-55 imprisonment, Soviet journalist/historian Eugenia Ginsberg spent almost a dozen years in a Siberian slave labor camp, working as a nurse, a farmhand, a kindergarten teacher, a chicken tender, and a tree feller. Inmates were excused from their jobs only when the temperature hit 50 below. Food rations were based on how many lengths of timber had been cut. Many died of disease, starvation and the cold.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1994 | RAY LOYND
As a medical thriller, "Mortal Fear" is about as entertaining as a clogged artery. The movie, adapted from Robin Cook's novel about the perils of gene-tampering, expires in the first half hour from a lack of narrative oxygen. The rest of the production, starring Joanna Kearns as a tireless physician tracking down mysterious deaths in a Boston hospital, is claustrophobic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Stuart (Justin Kirk) and Nicole (Julianne Nicholson) meet on a blind date that oddly also briefly includes his brother Jordan (Jamie Harrold), her best friend Tess (Chelsea Altman) and their therapist. It gets stranger from there in Jeff Lipsky's offbeat second feature, "Flannel Pajamas," which follows the couple's life from giddy setup to marital strife. They fall for each other immediately, despite the fact that they have nothing in common.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
When "Hello, Dolly!" came out, one of the people who didn't complain about its being a rip-off of Thornton Wilder's "The Matchmaker" was Thornton Wilder. To Wilder, literature was "a relay race"--a process of passing it on. He had borrowed his materials from Moliere and Nestroy, and he had no problem deeding them over to Broadway to see what could be done with them as a musical. Time would decide who had told the fable best.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | DEBORAH HASTINGS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Despite several changes in NBC flight plans, "Wings" has distinguished itself as the little plane that could. Since its April 19, 1990, premiere as a spring replacement series, "Wings" has endured more turbulence than a jetliner battling wind shear. The 30-minute comedy has shuttled back and forth between Thursday and Friday nights, endured short hauls on the prime-time schedule and still managed to fly over a crowded hangar of network comedies. The season-ender was a cliffhanger.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Any resemblance between "My Life" (citywide) and real life is strictly coincidental. Blind to complexities, this is a touchy-feely film that wouldn't recognize an honest emotion if one hit it like a truck. Those, however, whom "Love Story" struck as realistic and who think Oscars ought to be handed out for "Reach Out and Touch Someone" commercials will find "My Life's" brand of synthetic bathos uncannily familiar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Welcome to the Gulag. During her 1937-55 imprisonment, Soviet journalist/historian Eugenia Ginsberg spent almost a dozen years in a Siberian slave labor camp, working as a nurse, a farmhand, a kindergarten teacher, a chicken tender, and a tree feller. Inmates were excused from their jobs only when the temperature hit 50 below. Food rations were based on how many lengths of timber had been cut. Many died of disease, starvation and the cold.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Macbeth," the bad-luck play, is likely to bring good luck to the La Jolla Playhouse. Director Des McAnuff doesn't take the abstract, conceptual route with Shakespeare's tragedy. His staging is bloody, bold and resolute, and he brings the beast down. It's evident that McAnuff has staged the play before outside (at the Stratford, Ontario, Festival.) He knows its traps and its electrical circuits, and he is not afraid to overload them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Imagine being a committed party-liner, married to an important Communist Party official, and being arrested on trumped-up charges for having been in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong person. And imagine spending the next 18 years imprisoned--the first two in a Moscow jail in solitary confinement and at least 12 of the last 16 in the gulag. Even Kafka could not have come up with a more cruel scenario.
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