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Rebecca Solnit

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January 23, 2011 | By Lynell George, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Infinite City A San Francisco Atlas Rebecca Solnit University of California Press: 157 pp. $49.95 (cloth), $24.95 (paper) (oversized format) We often speak of inhabiting a place ? a country, a city or our own small plot of land ? but seldom do we pause to deeply consider how that place inhabits us: not just how we define it but also how it defines who we are. Places exist in our minds, perhaps more vividly than they might in the moments we physically pass through them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Rebecca Solnit's latest book, "The Faraway Nearby" (Viking: 260 pp., $25.95), began with a delivery of 100 pounds of apricots. "It was like a trumpet blew and said, 'You're entering the world of narrative," the 52-year-old author recalls by phone from her home in San Francisco's Mission District, her voice soft as falling petals, her laugh a whisper on the wire. The apricots came from her brother, who had collected them from a tree in their mother's yard. At the time, the older woman was in the throes of Alzheimer's; she had been moved into an assisted care facility, making the fruit a metaphor, an allegory, for everything that she, that the family, had lost.
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BOOKS
June 17, 2007 | Bill McKibben, Bill McKibben is the author of "Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future" and an organizer of this spring's Stepitup07.org demonstrations against global warming.
IN one of the best essays in this sterling collection, activist Rebecca Solnit describes Silicon Valley as "a decentralized, diffused region: postindustrial, postcommunal, postrural, and posturban -- postplace." Nothing so new in that observation, but in the pages that follow she explains the reasons that placelessness matters. When there's no there there -- no Bastille to storm -- then confronting power becomes so frustrating that it's easy to just give up and play another round of Doom.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Summer is my favorite season - always has been. Partly, it's the light: slow and thick, like a glaze of honey spread across the world. Partly, it's the heat, which I feel in my joints, making me imagine I was loose-limbed again. But more than anything, it's the feeling of space, of the moment expanding, the faith that, during these three months, I might do anything. That's an adolescent's faith, to be sure, but it has lingered, as if there might be (to borrow a phrase from a favorite episode of "The Twilight Zone")
BOOKS
January 15, 1995 | Carole Gallagher, Carole Gallagher is the author, most recently, of "American Ground Zero: The Secret Nuclear War" (Random House) and is currently working on a memoir
Most people who have experienced the detonation of a nuclear bomb report that they could never think about life in the same way again. Indeed, there should be something memorable about an atomic bomb, yet over the past 50 years we have rid ourselves of its presence in much the same way that good Germans refused to see the floating ash and smell the acrid odor of bodies burning in the death camps of the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | William Deverell, Deverell is director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West and currently the Frederick W. Beinecke Senior Fellow in Western Americana at Yale.
A Paradise Built in Hell The Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster Rebecca Solnit Viking: 354 pp., $27.95 The bad news is that more disasters are coming, arising from any number of sources: climate change, widespread infrastructural vulnerabilities, toxic threats brewed at cellular or weapons-grade levels, seismic or oceanic volatility, and so on and so on. Whatever their cause, disasters will be born of some mixture of...
OPINION
November 5, 2009
Re "The California Fix: A deficit of rationality," and "The California Fix: The Golden State isn't worth it," Opinion, Nov. 1 Rebecca Solnit is a classic left-wing redistributionist. According to her, California would have plenty of everything if only it weren't for those small-minded farmers, selfish millionaires and greedy corporations. Solnit has no idea how to create wealth, only how to spread it around. If California ever gets into the hands of Solnit and her ilk, it will be a place where everyone is equal -- equally poor, equally hungry, equally devastated.
OPINION
April 19, 2008
Re "Men who explain things," Opinion, April 13 I found Rebecca Solnit's description of the ongoing state of gender inequality in the world far too one-sided. As she relates by anecdote, there indeed are people who think they know everything. I believe it is accurate to characterize such individuals as narcissists, many but not all of whom are male. I could offer testimonials just as passionate as Solnit's about my life experience in which gender is consistently trumped by merit. As important as it may be to crusade for change where it still is needed, I think it is equally important to acknowledge that, on some fronts, the war for gender equality is pretty much over.
NEWS
October 9, 2003 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
For those with even a cursory knowledge of art history, the name Eadweard Muybridge rings familiar, primarily because his widely published 1872 motion studies of trotting horses begat the development of cinema. For well over a century, Muybridge remained a crucial but marginalized figure, an important footnote in photography's historical lineage.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Rebecca Solnit's latest book, "The Faraway Nearby" (Viking: 260 pp., $25.95), began with a delivery of 100 pounds of apricots. "It was like a trumpet blew and said, 'You're entering the world of narrative," the 52-year-old author recalls by phone from her home in San Francisco's Mission District, her voice soft as falling petals, her laugh a whisper on the wire. The apricots came from her brother, who had collected them from a tree in their mother's yard. At the time, the older woman was in the throes of Alzheimer's; she had been moved into an assisted care facility, making the fruit a metaphor, an allegory, for everything that she, that the family, had lost.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2011 | By Lynell George, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Infinite City A San Francisco Atlas Rebecca Solnit University of California Press: 157 pp. $49.95 (cloth), $24.95 (paper) (oversized format) We often speak of inhabiting a place ? a country, a city or our own small plot of land ? but seldom do we pause to deeply consider how that place inhabits us: not just how we define it but also how it defines who we are. Places exist in our minds, perhaps more vividly than they might in the moments we physically pass through them.
OPINION
November 5, 2009
Re "The California Fix: A deficit of rationality," and "The California Fix: The Golden State isn't worth it," Opinion, Nov. 1 Rebecca Solnit is a classic left-wing redistributionist. According to her, California would have plenty of everything if only it weren't for those small-minded farmers, selfish millionaires and greedy corporations. Solnit has no idea how to create wealth, only how to spread it around. If California ever gets into the hands of Solnit and her ilk, it will be a place where everyone is equal -- equally poor, equally hungry, equally devastated.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | William Deverell, Deverell is director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West and currently the Frederick W. Beinecke Senior Fellow in Western Americana at Yale.
A Paradise Built in Hell The Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster Rebecca Solnit Viking: 354 pp., $27.95 The bad news is that more disasters are coming, arising from any number of sources: climate change, widespread infrastructural vulnerabilities, toxic threats brewed at cellular or weapons-grade levels, seismic or oceanic volatility, and so on and so on. Whatever their cause, disasters will be born of some mixture of...
OPINION
April 19, 2008
Re "Men who explain things," Opinion, April 13 I found Rebecca Solnit's description of the ongoing state of gender inequality in the world far too one-sided. As she relates by anecdote, there indeed are people who think they know everything. I believe it is accurate to characterize such individuals as narcissists, many but not all of whom are male. I could offer testimonials just as passionate as Solnit's about my life experience in which gender is consistently trumped by merit. As important as it may be to crusade for change where it still is needed, I think it is equally important to acknowledge that, on some fronts, the war for gender equality is pretty much over.
BOOKS
June 17, 2007 | Bill McKibben, Bill McKibben is the author of "Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future" and an organizer of this spring's Stepitup07.org demonstrations against global warming.
IN one of the best essays in this sterling collection, activist Rebecca Solnit describes Silicon Valley as "a decentralized, diffused region: postindustrial, postcommunal, postrural, and posturban -- postplace." Nothing so new in that observation, but in the pages that follow she explains the reasons that placelessness matters. When there's no there there -- no Bastille to storm -- then confronting power becomes so frustrating that it's easy to just give up and play another round of Doom.
BOOKS
February 12, 2006 | Thomas Curwen, Thomas Curwen is an editor at large for The Times.
IN the summer of 2001, writer Rebecca Solnit and photographers Mark Klett and Byron Wolfe did what nearly 4 million people do every year: They visited Yosemite. It was the first of five extended expeditions into the national park taken over three years -- "a fishing trip," Solnit called their initial outing, "an expedition to find out what was there and what we could make of it." The agenda was actually more purposeful.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2005 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Toward the end of her latest book, an intriguing amalgam of personal memoir, philosophical speculation, natural lore, cultural history and art criticism, San Francisco-based writer Rebecca Solnit remarks: "A man once told me that much of my writing was about loss ... and I thought about that comment for a long time." As a historian, Solnit reflects, she feels strongly committed to retrieving lost material from the past, to prevent it from slipping away.
BOOKS
February 12, 2006 | Thomas Curwen, Thomas Curwen is an editor at large for The Times.
IN the summer of 2001, writer Rebecca Solnit and photographers Mark Klett and Byron Wolfe did what nearly 4 million people do every year: They visited Yosemite. It was the first of five extended expeditions into the national park taken over three years -- "a fishing trip," Solnit called their initial outing, "an expedition to find out what was there and what we could make of it." The agenda was actually more purposeful.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2005 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Toward the end of her latest book, an intriguing amalgam of personal memoir, philosophical speculation, natural lore, cultural history and art criticism, San Francisco-based writer Rebecca Solnit remarks: "A man once told me that much of my writing was about loss ... and I thought about that comment for a long time." As a historian, Solnit reflects, she feels strongly committed to retrieving lost material from the past, to prevent it from slipping away.
NEWS
October 9, 2003 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
For those with even a cursory knowledge of art history, the name Eadweard Muybridge rings familiar, primarily because his widely published 1872 motion studies of trotting horses begat the development of cinema. For well over a century, Muybridge remained a crucial but marginalized figure, an important footnote in photography's historical lineage.
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